WIRED: Open Source Intelligence May Be Changing Old-School War

WIRED: Open Source Intelligence May Be Changing Old-School War. “Open source intelligence is information that can be readily and legally accessed by the general public. It was used in war and diplomacy long before the internet—alongside information stolen or otherwise secretly obtained and closely held. But its prevalence today means what was once cost-prohibitive to many is now affordable to myriad actors, whether North Korea, the CIA, journalists, terrorists, or cybercriminals.”

The Quint World: Anonymous Attempts To Help Sri Lankans but Instead Leaks Data of Thousands

The Quint World: Anonymous Attempts To Help Sri Lankans but Instead Leaks Data of Thousands. “Accounts connected with the group have since claimed to have targeted the websites of the Sri Lanka Police, the Ceylon Electricity Board, and the Health Ministry, primarily using distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. While their campaign against the government has largely been ineffective, they have released data of thousands of ordinary Sri Lankan citizens that could leave them vulnerable to cybercrimes.”

Interview: The Role of Hacktivism in the Russia-Ukraine Conflict (InfoSecurity Magazine)

InfoSecurity Magazine: Interview: The Role of Hacktivism in the Russia-Ukraine Conflict. “Hacktivism has played a significant role in cyberspace for several years, with a range of high-profile entities targeted by hackers for political reasons. These range from governments and various other political groups for policies they disagree with to exposing privacy issues relating to manufacturers’ products. Recently, a range of individual hackers and hacktivist groups have been attracted to the current Russia-Ukraine conflict, effectively taking sides and targeting government agencies and other important organizations.”

Washington Post: Hacktivists are back

Washington Post: Hacktivists are back. “Hacktivists are back in the public spotlight, nearly a decade after groups like Anonymous and LulzSec tore through the Internet and wreaked havoc on everyone from Sony to the U.S. Senate. In places including the United States, Iran and Belarus, hackers aiming to further political goals have gone after companies and organizations perceived as right-wing, the surveillance industry and even authoritarian governments.”

Slate: Practice Hacktivism at Your Own Risk

Slate: Practice Hacktivism at Your Own Risk. “People launch cyberattacks for all sorts of different reasons—to steal money, to steal secrets, to show off their skills, to wreak havoc, but also for (what they consider to be) altruistic reasons. Martin Gottesfeld did it to draw attention to the case of Justina Pelletier, a Connecticut teenager who was admitted to Boston Children’s Hospital in 2013 and kept in a psychiatric ward there, against her parents’ wishes, for more than a year. Pelletier was ultimately returned to her family, but before that, Gottesfeld launched distributed denial-of-service attacks on two Massachusetts medical facilities involved in Pelletier’s care.”

Digital Trends: These activists are hacking housing problems in NYC using apps and data

Digital Trends: These activists are hacking housing problems in NYC using apps and data . “These do-gooders informally identify as the Housing Data Coalition and consist of a variety of principled hacktivists who are building easy-to-use, intuitive tools that employ data as a weapon to combat illicit and unethical housing practices in a city that houses nearly 9 million people. They call their tools ‘civic technology’ and employ their skills in service of the people, not the landlords who prey on vulnerable populations.”