ARRL: Amateur Radio Digital Communications Grants Continue

ARRL: Amateur Radio Digital Communications Grants Continue. “Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) has continued its largesse, funding a variety of projects through individual grants. Among the latest is a nearly $900,000 award that will permit the Internet Archive to build the Digital Library of Amateur Radio and Communications (DLARC), ‘an online, open-access resource that preserves the vital resources — past, present, and future — that document the history of amateur radio and communications,’ as the project proposal explained.”

Hackaday: Web Pages (And More) Via Shortwave

Hackaday: Web Pages (And More) Via Shortwave. “If you are a ham radio operator, the idea of sending pictures and data over voice channels is nothing new. Hams have lots of techniques for doing that and — not so long ago — even most data transmissions were over phone lines. However, now everyone can get in on the game thanks to the cheap availability of software-defined radio. Several commercial shortwave broadcasters are sending encoded data including images and even entire web pages.”

ARRL: Yahoo Groups Shutdown has Ham Radio Interest Groups Seeking to Save Content

ARRL: Yahoo Groups Shutdown has Ham Radio Interest Groups Seeking to Save Content. “Web application developer Andy Majot, K5QO, of Sellersburg, Indiana, took the initiative to download archives of Yahoo Groups devoted to individual ham radio gear and uploaded them to his personal website. ‘I hope to have them hosted in perpetuity for future hams to use,’ Majot told ARRL. ‘It should be noted that I backed up groups regardless of whether they are living on in other platforms; I wanted to snapshot the groups as they were on Yahoo prior to their deletion.’”

Hackaday: Google Assistant, Now Available On Ham Radio

File this under “Oh, why not,” from Hackaday: Google Assistant, Now Available On Ham Radio. “Depending on who you talk to, Google Assistant is either a tool capable of quickly and clearly answering audio queries in natural langauge, or a noisier and less useful version of Wolfram Alpha. [William Franzin] decided it would be particularly cool to make the service available over ham radio – and that’s exactly what he did.” Lots of comments.