SC Times: St. John’s Hill Museum & Manuscript Library receives $1.4 million grant

SC Times: St. John’s Hill Museum & Manuscript Library receives $1.4 million grant. “The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library at St. John’s University received more than $1.4 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support its mission to preserve and share the world’s handwritten heritage. The grant will fund a three-year project to catalog 53,000 digitized manuscripts and create an online database of authors and titles originating from underrepresented or little-known literary traditions, according to a news release issued by the university Tuesday.”

Route Fifty: The Legislative Push to Bring Back Cursive

Route Fifty: The Legislative Push to Bring Back Cursive. “Loop the T, hold the pen just so, practice writing, ‘The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog’: if legislators in Wisconsin have their way, elementary school students will soon become versed in the lost art of cursive handwriting instruction.”

Museums+Heritage: National Trust digitises Churchill’s visitors book to offer new interactive experience

Museums+Heritage: National Trust digitises Churchill’s visitors book to offer new interactive experience. “The National Trust has digitised the entries of the visitors book at Chartwell, Churchill’s former home in Kent. Signatures from over 700 guests who visited the estate between 1924 and 1964 are now available to the public via a new interactive resource.”

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton

Science Blog: Shakespeare’s Mystery Annotator Identified As John Milton. “It is well known that Shakespeare was a huge influence on Milton. From learning how to write nature poetry to creating charismatic villains, Milton’s debt to his forebear continues to fascinate experts. The younger poet once praised the ‘wonder and astonishment’ that this ‘great heir of fame’ conjured up in his readers. But now, Jason Scott-Warren from Cambridge’s English Faculty believes he has identified even more tangible evidence of this connection.”

The Washington Post: The National Archives has billions of handwritten documents. With cursive skills declining, how will we read them?

The Washington Post: The National Archives has billions of handwritten documents. With cursive skills declining, how will we read them?. “We all know that cursive has gone out of style. To modern young people, deciphering the wavy old-fashioned script can seem as relevant as dialing a rotary phone or milking a cow. For institutions like the National Archives, this poses a very specific problem.”

University of Rochester: Seward Family Digital Archive project tops $1 million in grant money

University of Rochester: Seward Family Digital Archive project tops $1 million in grant money. “The project, a collaboration between the University’s Department of History, the River Campus Libraries’ department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, and the Digital Scholarship Lab, brings together students in the humanities and computer science, residents of retirement communities, and retired volunteers from the greater Rochester area to help transcribe the thousands of Seward family letters, all written in Victorian-era cursive handwriting.”

Student project report: Scribal Handwriting: An automated manuscript analysis tool (British Library)

British Library: Student project report: Scribal Handwriting: An automated manuscript analysis tool. “The team was challenged to create a tool for palaeographers (researchers who analyse handwriting) that can determine the date of a manuscript and sometimes even its scribe and place of production. To help with this task, we designed a tool to quickly find occurrences of similar handwritten characters across a collection of documents. This would be a lengthy and repetitive task if done manually by researchers. Typically, researchers compare characters’ features such as script, size and ink of different manuscripts to establish possible similarities between manuscripts and scribes. Our mission was to create a faster and reliable tool that could be used by palaeographers. Our aim was to speed up their research process by automating the comparisons between characters.”