“Just An Ass-Backward Tech Company”: How Twitter Lost The Internet War (Vanity Fair)

Vanity Fair: “Just An Ass-Backward Tech Company”: How Twitter Lost The Internet War. “Del Harvey, Twitter’s resident troll hunter, has a fitting, if unusual, backstory for somebody in charge of policing one of the Internet’s most ungovernable platforms. As a teenager, she spent a summer as a lifeguard at a state mental institution; at 21, she began volunteering for Perverted Justice, a vigilante group that lures pedophiles into online chat rooms and exposes their identities. When the group partnered with NBC in 2004 to launch To Catch a Predator, Harvey posed as a child to help put pedophiles in jail. In 2008, she joined Twitter, then a small status-updating service whose 140-character quirk was based on the amount of alphanumerics that could be contained on a flip-phone screen. She was employee No. 25, and her job was to combat spam accounts.”

BuzzFeed: Twitter Says Impersonating A Journalist During A Mass Shooting Doesn’t Violate Its Rules

BuzzFeed: Twitter Says Impersonating A Journalist During A Mass Shooting Doesn’t Violate Its Rules. “In the wake of the Florida high school shooting Wednesday, Twitter users began spreading doctored tweets targeting Miami Herald reporter Alex Harris. The shooting Wednesday left at least 17 dead. After the shooter entered the school and began the attack, some students posted on Snapchat and Twitter about what was happening. Harris was one of the first reporters to reach out to the students to help explain the situation. As the tweet went viral, Harris began getting harassment.”

CNET: Gunman shot dead by police after targeting YouTube stars

CNET: Gunman shot dead by police after targeting YouTube stars. “The Albuquerque Journal reports that local man Christopher Giles travelled to Austin, Texas, on 26 January and broke into the home of gamer and cosplayer Megan Turney and Gavin Free of YouTube channel Slo-Mo Guys. Hearing glass breaking, the couple hid and called 911. Austin Police officers confronted Giles as he drove away, hearing a gunshot from the car and returning fire.”

BBC News: Twitch to ban users for ‘hate’ on other platforms

BBC News: Twitch to ban users for ‘hate’ on other platforms. “Twitch has updated its guidelines so that abuse taking place on other platforms can contribute to a suspension on the streaming site. Directing ‘hate or harassment’ towards someone on Twitch using other services will be considered a policy violation.”

Slate: Twitter Is Giving Trolls a Cheat Sheet

Slate: Twitter Is Giving Trolls a Cheat Sheet. “Popularity is the implied goal of every tweet. Each 280-character set is measured numerically thrice: by tallies of replies, retweets, and likes. But many longtime Twitter users have learned that it’s preferable not to be too relevant or too influential. That’s because being made part of a Twitter Moment—the Twitter equivalent of a story on A1, the site’s attempt to distill the organic conversations that happen on the social network into digestible nuggets—can put a target on one’s back.”

Crossing the Line: What Counts as Online Harassment? (Pew)

Pew (pew pew pew pew!): Crossing the Line: What Counts as Online Harassment?. “Pew Research Center surveys have found that online harassment is a common phenomenon in the digital lives of many Americans, and that a majority of Americans feel harassment online is a major problem. Even so, there is considerable debate over what online harassment actually means in practice.”

Salon: Social media anti-harassment strategies won’t stop trolls

Salon: Social media anti-harassment strategies won’t stop trolls. “There’s a good chance that if you regularly spend time on the internet (and who doesn’t these days?), you may have been harassed. The Pew Research Center says 41% of Americans have been harassed online in some way, and about one in five people have been seriously harassed, like receiving ‘physical threats, harassment over a sustained period, sexual harassment or stalking.’ And women are nearly twice as likely to say they’ve reported severe harassment online — frequently on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. Entire internal task forces have been created to monitor and police the platforms, and they’ve repeatedly insisted that tackling this issue is a major priority. But a recent study shows that as they attempt to quell hateful behavior on their platforms, Twitter and Facebook may actually be making thing worse.”