The Next Web: Google listed the wrong number for its product hotline, nobody noticed

The Next Web: Google listed the wrong number for its product hotline, nobody noticed. “Not so long ago, Google set up a consultation hotline in case you needed to be convinced why your home needs a smart speaker – or any other smart device. But if you were wondering why nobody was picking up the phone, don’t worry, it wasn’t personal: the Big G had listed the wrong number on product pages for months.”

Neowin: Snap Inc launches third iteration of its Spectacles sunglasses

Neowin: Snap Inc launches third iteration of its Spectacles sunglasses. “Snap Inc, the firm behind Snapchat, has announced Spectacles 3, it’s latest attempt at camera-equipped sunglasses. The new model comes in two colours, Carbon and Mineral and includes HD cameras near each eye to capture depth and dimensions similarly to eyes. The glasses also let users record videos in 3D at 60 fps, all with high-fidelity audio.” I really wonder why Snap keeps coming back to this.

The Verge: You may be owed up to $500 if you owned a Pixel or Pixel XL

The Verge: You may be owed up to $500 if you owned a Pixel or Pixel XL. “Earlier this year, Google agreed to settle a class action lawsuit that claims the company knowingly sold first-generation Pixel phones with defective microphones. Now, the final approval has gone through, meaning if you bought an original Pixel or Pixel XL before January 7th, 2017, you’re probably eligible for some money.”

Mashable: Hackers can ransomware your fancy digital camera

Mashable: Hackers can ransomware your fancy digital camera. “Not even your precious memories are safe from hackers. That much was made clear at the annual DEF CON hacking conference in Las Vegas, where a security researcher demonstrated just how easy it is to remotely encrypt a digital camera with ransomware. And once that happens, you can say goodbye to all your photos — unless you pay up.”

Popular Science: How to do two-factor authentication like a pro

Popular Science: How to do two-factor authentication like a pro . “…deciding to activate 2FA is like deciding you want to start running—do you just want to jog a bit, train for a 5k, or get yourself in shape for an entire marathon? There are a number of options, including apps and security keys, that provide different levels of protection for all your security and privacy needs. You can use a single method that works best for you, or employ several for one account, depending on the platform. The choice is yours.”

Techdirt: Consumer Reports Finds Numerous Home Routers Lack Even Basic Security Protections

Techdirt: Consumer Reports Finds Numerous Home Routers Lack Even Basic Security Protections. “11 of the 26 major router brands examined by the organization came with flimsy password protection. 20 of the routers let users only change the password, but not the username of web-based router management clients. 20 of the routers also failed to protect users from repeated failed password login attempts, now commonplace on most apps, phones, and other services.”