Inside Indiana Business: IU Awarded $500K Grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Inside Indiana Business: IU Awarded $500K Grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. “The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in New York is awarding a $500,000 grant to Indiana University to support the HathiTrust Research Center. IU says the grant will allow the center to develop reusable worksets and research models from the 17-million-volume HathiTrust Digital Library.”

Ars Technica: University libraries offer online “lending” of scanned in-copyright books

Ars Technica: University libraries offer online “lending” of scanned in-copyright books. “The coronavirus crisis has forced the closure of libraries around the world, depriving the public of access to millions of printed books. Books old enough to be in the public domain may be available for free download online. Many recent books are available to borrow in e-book form. But there are many other books—especially those published in the mid-to-late 20th century—that are hard to access without going to a physical library. A consortium of university libraries called HathiTrust recently announced a solution to this problem, called the Emergency Temporary Access Service. It allows participating HathiTrust member libraries to offer their patrons digital scans of books that they can ‘check out’ and read online.”

EdTech Magazine: Digital Library Opens Avenues for Data Analysis in Academic Research

EdTech Magazine: Digital Library Opens Avenues for Data Analysis in Academic Research. “At the HathiTrust Digital Library, there are no carrels, no tables, no card catalog and no reference desk. There’s almost nothing physical at all. This collection of nearly 17 million digitized volumes from dozens of campus libraries exists entirely online. An estimated 95 percent of those volumes were originally scanned by Google when it partnered with universities to create its Google Books project starting in 2002, says Mike Furlough, executive director of HathiTrust at the University of Michigan.”

University of Kentucky: UK Libraries Expands Resources With HathiTrust

University of Kentucky: UK Libraries Expands Resources With HathiTrust. “University of Kentucky Libraries has joined HathiTrust, a growing, global partnership with more than 145 major research institutions and libraries. This new partnership will bolster the accessibility of resources currently available to UK faculty, staff and students. UK is the first institution in Kentucky to join HathiTrust.”

California Digital Library: HathtiTrust Turns 10!

California Digital Library: HathtiTrust Turns 10!. “October 13 marks the 10th anniversary of the HathiTrust Digital Library. Ten years ago, HathiTrust was launched jointly by the 12-university consortium known as the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) and the 10 university libraries of University of California system. The University of Michigan served as the primary host organization for HathiTrust, and CDL served to coordinate UC participation. HathiTrust was established to create a digital preservation repository and access platform to share digitized collections.”

HathiTrust Research Center Extends Non-Consumptive Research Tools to Copyrighted Materials: Expanding Research through Fair Use (HathiTrust)

HathiTrust: HathiTrust Research Center Extends Non-Consumptive Research Tools to Copyrighted Materials: Expanding Research through Fair Use. “Since 2011, HTRC has been developing services and tools to allow researchers to employ text and data mining methodologies using the HathiTrust collection. To date, this service has been available only on the portion of the collection that is out of copyright. With the development of a landmark HathiTrust policy and an updated release of HTRC Analytics, HTRC now provides access to the text of the complete 16.7-million-item HathiTrust corpus for non-consumptive research, such as data mining and computational analysis, including items protected by copyright.” I am probably parading my ignorance here but I didn’t know what “non-consumptive” means. It sounds like research that doesn’t have tuberculosis. HathiTrust has a page to lay it all out.

EdSurge: What Happened to Google’s Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books?

EdSurge: What Happened to Google’s Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books?. “It was a crazy idea: Take the bulk of the world’s books, scan them, and create a monumental digital library for all to access. That’s what Google dreamed of doing when it embarked on its ambitious book-digitizing project in 2002. It got part of the way there, digitizing at least 25 million books from major university libraries. But the promised library of everything hasn’t come into being.”

HathiTrust: HathiTrust Libraries Propose to Retain More Than 16 Million Volumes in Shared Print Program

HathiTrust: HathiTrust Libraries Propose to Retain More Than 16 Million Volumes in Shared Print Program. “Fifty HathiTrust member libraries have proposed to retain more than 16 million volumes for 25 years under the HathiTrust Shared Print Program. These volumes correspond to more than 4.8 million individual book titles held in the HathiTrust Digital Library (about 65% of all HathiTrust digital monographs). This is a significant step toward the primary goal of the program: to ensure that print copies of all HathiTrust digital holdings remain available to scholars for many years to come.”

Cornell University: A century of agriculture research goes online

Cornell University: A century of agriculture research goes online. “Cornell University Library collaborated with Kathryn J. Boor ’80, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ (CALS), to release copyright restrictions on more than 1,700 documents published between 1880 and 1996. This material – produced by scholars at CALS, including the Cornell University and New York State Agricultural Experiment Stations, as well as Cornell Cooperative Extension – can now be searched, downloaded and read on HathiTrust, a digital library of more than 15 million volumes, of which Cornell University Library is a partner.”

Over 500,000 Volumes From Latin America Collection Added to HathiTrust

The University of Texas at Austin has put a huge collection of Latin American books online. “More than 500,000 books from the stacks of the Benson Latin American Collection, a trove of treasures related to Latin America, have been digitized and are now accessible online. The project is an extension of the University of Texas Libraries partnership with Google to digitize books and other literature to create a massive digital repository.” The blurb mentions Google books but the volumes are available at HathiTrust.

ALA Puts Webinar “Finding the Public Domain” Online

The ALA has put its latest Webinar “Finding the Public Domain” online. “Melissa Levine, Lead Copyright Officer and PI, University of Michigan Library and Kristina Eden, Copyright Review Project Manager, HathiTrust, describe the Copyright Review Management System (CRMS). The CRMS was this year’s awardee of the L. Ray Patterson copyright award.” The Webinar is free and just under 55 minutes.

HathiTrust and the NFB Are Teaming Up

HathiTrust and the National Federation of the Blind are teaming up, and it’s good news for visually-impaired readers. “More than 14 million digital books will soon be made available to blind and print-disabled users, thanks to a new collaboration involving the National Federation of the Blind and the HathiTrust Digital Library, a digital repository hosted at the University of Michigan. When launched, the program will dramatically increase the availability of books for users who are blind or print-disabled. According to the NFB, currently less than 5 percent of all published works are estimated to be available to the blind, most of which are popular titles.”

HathiTrust Opens Entire Collection for Data Analysis

Data analysts, you’ve now got a huge dataset to swim around in: The entire HathiTrust collection. “The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), a cooperative service of Indiana University, University of Illinois, and HathiTrust, has expanded its services to support computational research on the entire collection of one of the world’s largest digital libraries, held by HathiTrust. HathiTrust’s collections include over 14 million digitized volumes, including more than 7 million books, more than 725,000 US federal government documents, and more than 350,000 serial publications. HathiTrust’s collections are drawn from some of the largest research libraries in North America, including Indiana University and the University of Illinois.”

GDELT Swallows and Digests 3.5 Million Books

GDELT has swallowed and digested 3.5 million books from the Internet Archive and HathiTrust. What’s bigger than big data?

“Today we are enormously excited to announce that more than 3.5 million digitized books stretching back two centuries, encompassing the complete English-language public domain collections of the Internet Archive (1.3M volumes) and HathiTrust (2.2 million volumes), have been processed using the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph and are now available in Google BigQuery. More than a billion pages stretching back 215 years have been examined to compile a list of all people, organizations, and other names, fulltext geocoded to render them fully mappable, and more than 4,500 emotions and themes compiled. All of this computed metadata is combined with all available book-level metadata, including title, author, publisher, and subject tags as provided by the contributing libraries. Even more excitingly, the complete fulltext of all Internet Archive books published 1800-1922 are included to allow you to perform your own near-realtime analyses. All of this is housed in Google BigQuery, making it possible to perform sophisticated analyses across 122 years of history in just seconds. A single line of SQL can execute even the most complex regular expression or complete JavaScript algorithm over nearly half a terabyte of fulltext in just 11 seconds and combine it with all of the extracted data above. Track emotions or themes over time or map the geography of the world as seen through books – the sky is the limit!”