AZ Central: Yuma doctor says Arizona has shortage of ICU beds, staff as COVID-19 cases surge

AZ Central: Yuma doctor says Arizona has shortage of ICU beds, staff as COVID-19 cases surge. “Dr. Cleavon Gilman was shocked when he came into work at Yuma Regional Medical Center this week and was told that although the hospital’s intensive care was full, patients in intensive care could not be transferred to other hospitals. ‘There was supposed to be 174 ICU beds in Arizona,’ Gilman said. ‘When I came on the shift there were none. And that’s unacceptable.'”

‘We are capacity now’: Task force says St. Louis hospitals will start sending patients to out-of-area facilities (KSDK)

KSDK: ‘We are capacity now’: Task force says St. Louis hospitals will start sending patients to out-of-area facilities. “St. Louis Metropolitan Task Force head Dr. Alex Garza had a grim message after touring area hospitals on the busiest travel day of 2020 so far: ‘We are at capacity now.’ Garza said that in one hospital, there was one bed for three waiting patients. He expects the Thanksgiving holiday — which traditionally comes with extended-family gatherings, travel, and shopping sprees — will increase local coronavirus cases.”

‘We’re drowning’: COVID cases flood hospitals in America’s heartland (Reuters)

Reuters: ‘We’re drowning’: COVID cases flood hospitals in America’s heartland. “The vital signs of the 30-year-old COVID-19 victim were crashing, and Kearny County Hospital in rural Lakin, Kansas, just wasn’t equipped to handle the case. Miller, Kearny’s chief medical officer – who doubles as the county health officer – called around to larger hospitals in search of an ICU bed. With coronavirus cases soaring throughout Kansas, he said, he couldn’t find a single one.”

New York Times: Emergency Hospital Reopening on Staten Island to Handle 2nd Wave

New York Times: Emergency Hospital Reopening on Staten Island to Handle 2nd Wave. “The announcement is another sign that New York City is in the grip of a second coronavirus wave that has already led to the closing of public schools, the reversal of some reopenings and warnings to families to scale back their Thanksgiving plans. It also raises the specter of a return to the pandemic’s darkest days in March and April.”

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah hospitals have begun informal rationing of care, doctors say, as they cope with surge of COVID-19 patients

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah hospitals have begun informal rationing of care, doctors say, as they cope with surge of COVID-19 patients. “With a combination of luck, new hires and creative reorganizing of staff and patients, Utah’s hospitals haven’t had to eject anyone from intensive care units due to the coronavirus. But several doctors say the solutions still amount to rationing, with the quality of care deteriorating as hospitals are stretched thinner and thinner.”

The Atlantic: Hospitals Can’t Go On Like This

The Atlantic: Hospitals Can’t Go On Like This. “At The Atlantic’s request, HHS provided data on the number of hospitals experiencing staffing shortages. From November 4 to November 11, 958 hospitals—19 percent of American hospitals—faced a staffing shortage. This week, 1,109 hospitals reported that they expect to face a staffing shortage. That’s 22 percent of all American hospitals. In eight states, the situation is even more dire.”

Washington Post: Some places were short on nurses before the virus. The pandemic is making it much worse.

Washington Post: Some places were short on nurses before the virus. The pandemic is making it much worse.. “As the virus stampedes across the country, setting previously unimaginable infection records nearly every day of its third major surge, some hospitals are desperately searching for staffers and paying dearly for it. There is record demand for travel nurses, who take out-of-town assignments on short-term contracts of 13 weeks or less at elevated wages. Per-diem nurses, who are willing to take a shift or two in their local hospitals, have been pressed into service. The military is chipping in. And still, in some places, it is not nearly enough.”

The Atlantic: It’s Time to Hunker Down

The Atlantic: It’s Time to Hunker Down. “Utah, Illinois, Minnesota, Colorado, and other states are already reporting that hospitals and intensive-care units are at or near capacity. The bottleneck for medical care isn’t just lack of space, or even equipment, which we may be able to increase, but staff—trained nurses and doctors who can attend to patients, and who cannot be manufactured out of thin air. During the spring crisis in the New York tristate area, health-care workers from around the country rushed to the region, buttressing the exhausted medical workforce. With a nationwide surge, doctors and nurses are needed in their hometown hospitals.”

Yahoo: Hospital ICUs running out of space due to COVID-19 surges across the country

Yahoo: Hospital ICUs running out of space due to COVID-19 surges across the country. “Wednesday marked the eighth consecutive day with over 100,000 coronavirus cases, and in the first eleven days of November, the country has recorded a staggering 1.2 million new coronavirus cases — more than the entire month of September. In 46 states, along with Washington, D.C., and Guam, cases are high and rising. Thirty-seven states, plus Washington, D.C., have had an increased rate of positivity, and 43 states, along with Puerto Rico, have had an increase in hospitalizations.”

Running out of room: St. Louis hospitals forced to turn away patients from rural areas as COVID cases soar (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Running out of room: St. Louis hospitals forced to turn away patients from rural areas as COVID cases soar. “Hospitalizations for COVID-19 are at a dizzying record-breaking climb with no downturn in sight in Missouri and across the Midwest. Emergency rooms are busy with patients waiting for hospital beds to open, hospital administrators say. Large metropolitan hospitals are having to turn away patients from small rural hospitals who depend on them for expert care. The number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in Missouri topped 2,000 for the first time on Nov. 6 — a 247% increase since the state’s lowest totals during the middle of June, according to the Missouri Hospital Association.”

The Atlantic: The Worst Day of the Pandemic Since May

The Atlantic: The Worst Day of the Pandemic Since May. “The United States is experiencing an unprecedented surge of hospitalizations across the country. Today, states reported that 61,964 people were hospitalized with COVID-19, more than at any other time in the pandemic. For context, there are now 40 percent more people hospitalized with COVID-19 than there were two weeks ago.”

Tulsa World: No ICU beds available in Tulsa amid COVID-19 case spike

Tulsa World: No ICU beds available in Tulsa amid COVID-19 case spike. “No intensive care unit beds were available in Tulsa hospitals Monday night amid record-breaking numbers of COVID-19 cases, a spokesman for the Oklahoma Regional Medical Response System confirmed. Adam Paluka, a spokesman for the system’s District 7 in Tulsa, told the Tulsa World on Monday night that the capacity limit applies to hospitals in the city but not the entirety of Tulsa County.”

Grand Forks Herald: With North Dakota hospitals at 100% capacity, Burgum announces COVID-positive nurses can stay at work

Grand Forks Herald: With North Dakota hospitals at 100% capacity, Burgum announces COVID-positive nurses can stay at work. “North Dakota’s hospitals have reached their limit, and the coming weeks could push them past their capabilities, Gov. Doug Burgum said at a news conference on Monday, Nov. 9. Due to a major shortage of health care staffing, the state’s hospitals have a severe lack of available beds. Rising COVID-19 hospitalizations and high noncoronavirus admissions, some resulting from residents who deferred health care earlier in the pandemic, have caused the crunch on medical centers.”

New York Times: Europe’s Hospital Crunch Grows More Dire, Surpassing Spring Peak

New York Times: Europe’s Hospital Crunch Grows More Dire, Surpassing Spring Peak. “More Europeans are seriously ill with the coronavirus than ever before, new hospital data for 21 countries shows, surpassing the worst days in the spring and threatening to overwhelm stretched hospitals and exhausted medical workers. New lockdowns have not yet stemmed the current influx of patients, which has only accelerated since it began growing in September, according to official counts of current patients collected by The New York Times.”

NPR: Internal Documents Reveal COVID-19 Hospitalization Data The Government Keeps Hidden

NPR: Internal Documents Reveal COVID-19 Hospitalization Data The Government Keeps Hidden. “NPR has obtained documents that give a snapshot of data the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services collects and analyzes daily. The documents — reports sent to agency staffers — highlight trends in hospitalizations and pinpoint cities nearing full hospital capacity and facilities under stress. They paint a granular picture of the strain on hospitals across the country that could help local citizens decide when to take extra precautions against COVID-19.”