New York Times: How Much Would Trump’s Coronavirus Treatment Cost Most Americans?

New York Times: How Much Would Trump’s Coronavirus Treatment Cost Most Americans?. “President Trump spent three days in the hospital. He arrived and left by helicopter. And he received multiple coronavirus tests, oxygen, steroids and an experimental antibody treatment. For someone who isn’t president, that would cost more than $100,000 in the American health system. Patients could face significant surprise bills and medical debt even after health insurance paid its share.”

NPR: Artists Turn GoFundMe Comments Into A ‘Get Well Soon!’ Card For A Sick System

Sometimes you read an article that just punches you in the pit of your stomach. NPR: Artists Turn GoFundMe Comments Into A ‘Get Well Soon!’ Card For A Sick System. “The popular crowdsourcing site GoFundMe is a go-to place to appeal for help with rent, medicine, child care and favorite causes. Along with donations, supporters leave comments ranging from ‘Can’t wait for you to have the glasses you need!’ to ‘Best of everything big guy,’ to simply ‘Get well soon!’ Artists Sam Lavigne and Tega Brain have turned those well wishes into an artwork called Get Well Soon! It consists of more than 200,000 comments scraped from GoFundMe and arranged alphabetically in relentless rows of hope, cheer and sympathy.”

ProPublica: A Doctor Went to His Own Employer for a COVID-19 Antibody Test. It Cost $10,984.

ProPublica: A Doctor Went to His Own Employer for a COVID-19 Antibody Test. It Cost $10,984.. “When Dr. Zachary Sussman went to Physicians Premier ER in Austin for a COVID-19 antibody test, he assumed he would get a freebie because he was a doctor for the chain. Instead, the free-standing emergency room charged his insurance company an astonishing $10,984 for the visit — and got paid every penny, with no pushback. The bill left him so dismayed he quit his job. And now, after ProPublica’s questions, the parent company of his insurer said the case is being investigated and could lead to repayment or a referral to law enforcement.”

New York Times: A Hospital Forgot to Bill Her Coronavirus Test. It Cost Her $1,980.

New York Times: A Hospital Forgot to Bill Her Coronavirus Test. It Cost Her $1,980.. “Ms. [Debbie] Krebs had a clear memory of the experience, particularly the doctor saying the coronavirus test would make her feel as if she had to sneeze. She wondered whether the doctor could have lied about performing the test, or if her swab could have gone missing. (But if so, why had the laboratory called her with results?) The absence of the coronavirus test made a big price difference. Insurers, Ms. Krebs had heard, were not charging patients for visits meant to diagnose coronavirus. Without the test, Ms. Krebs didn’t qualify for that protection and owed $1,980. She called the hospital to explain the situation but immediately ran into roadblocks.”

Newsweek: Family of Man Who Died of Coronavirus Hit With $1 Million Hospital Bill

Newsweek: Family of Man Who Died of Coronavirus Hit With $1 Million Hospital Bill. “Florida family received a claims summary from a hospital totaling more than $1 million over a relative who died from the novel coronavirus. A picture of the claims summary was posted to an Instagram account June 28. The account holder, workshoppgh, wrote a lengthy post about the $1,123,600 bill and said: ‘No one should have to face this virus alone and make it out to get bills like this.'”

Reuters: U.S. group raises pricing recommendation for Gilead’s remdesivir in COVID-19

Reuters: U.S. group raises pricing recommendation for Gilead’s remdesivir in COVID-19. “Gilead Sciences Inc’s (GILD.O) antiviral remdesivir could be priced up to $5,080 per course based on benefits shown in COVID-19 patients, a U.S. drug pricing research group suggested on Wednesday, above its prior recommendation of around $4,500.”

Fox 17: New website could help you save money on medical bills

Fox 17: New website could help you save money on medical bills. “It’s pretty straight forward and completely free to use, all you have to do is answer a few questions including your income, insurance status, and how much you owe at which hospital. In a couple minutes it will tell you if you qualify.” Applying for financial assistance is an additional step. You can do it on your own, or the site can help you for a fee of $29.

Politico: White House still scrambling to cover virus treatment for the uninsured

Politico: White House still scrambling to cover virus treatment for the uninsured. “The White House pledged over two weeks ago to cover coronavirus treatment for uninsured Americans — but the administration still doesn’t have a plan for how to do it. Trump officials are still grappling with key questions about how exactly to implement the treatment fund, including how to determine if a patient qualifies for the new federal dollars, an administration source said. Adding to the challenge, they’re still figuring out how to divvy up funding that hospitals and physicians say is desperately needed.”

Mashable: Relying on crowdfunding to pay health bills? It’s more common than you might think.

Mashable: Relying on crowdfunding to pay health bills? It’s more common than you might think.. “Researchers from NORC at the University of Chicago recently conducted a survey to learn about the prevalence of crowdfunding health campaigns. It turns out that a large swath of the American public — approximately 50 million, or 20 percent of Americans — have contributed to these sorts of campaigns. What’s more, eight million Americans have started a campaign to help pay for medical expenses for themselves or someone in their household, while 12 million had started a campaign for someone else. According to the researchers’ survey, that’s three percent and five percent, respectively.”

OneZero: A Black Market for Life-Saving Insulin Thrives on Social Media

OneZero: A Black Market for Life-Saving Insulin Thrives on Social Media. “Insulin is an essential and life-saving drug used by 7.4 million people in the United States. Over the last few years, it’s become increasingly expensive. Between 2012 and 2016, the price of insulin effectively doubled for people with type one diabetes, with costs jumping from $239 to $475 per month, on average. These controversial and dramatic price hikes, singled out by presidential candidates like Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, have become symbols of a failing American healthcare system. They have also created a thriving online black market for insulin.”

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: State launches more consumer-friendly website with inspection reports on healthcare facilities

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: State launches more consumer-friendly website with inspection reports on healthcare facilities. “A month after a glitch took the state’s healthcare facility website offline, the Georgia Department of Community Health on Thursday restored online access while launching a new version of the website with crucial licensing and inspection information for thousands of facilities.”

SF Gate: Wyoming lawmakers approve database showing high health costs

SF Gate: Wyoming lawmakers approve database showing high health costs. “Wyoming lawmakers have voted to approve the continued use of a database tracking insurance claims to provide insight into the cost of health care in the state. The Star-Tribune reported Wednesday that the Labor, Health and Social Services Committee approved a bill to continue the multi-payer claims database, despite not having a funding source.”

Bay News 9: Florida Launches New Tool to Make Health Care Prices Transparent

Bay News 9: Florida Launches New Tool to Make Health Care Prices Transparent. “Governor Ron DeSantis announced a new initiative Monday morning to make health care prices in Florida more transparent. The state has launched a new website called Florida Health Price Finder which shows you the price of medical procedures in the state.”

Hartford Courant: New tool aims to remove the mystery of health care costs at Connecticut hospitals

Hartford Courant: New tool aims to remove the mystery of health care costs at Connecticut hospitals. “A new cost estimator tool launched by the Office of Health Strategy reveals how much medical treatment costs vary across Connecticut’s health care facilities. Standard procedures, like knee replacements, can cost nearly three times as much at certain hospitals than they do at others.”