University of Alabama at Birmingham: Emergency department staff have high COVID-19 vaccination rates

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Emergency department staff have high COVID-19 vaccination rates. “An overwhelming majority of health care personnel in hospital emergency departments have received a vaccine against COVID-19, according to findings published in Academic Emergency Medicine, the official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. The study showed that 95 percent of health care personnel were offered vaccination against COVID-19 within the first month of prioritized distribution to this high-risk group and 86 percent accepted vaccination.”

USA Today: The number of hospitals reporting full ICUs has fallen by nearly 50% since early January

USA Today: The number of hospitals reporting full ICUs has fallen by nearly 50% since early January. “From Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles, Washington, to Sibley Memorial Center in Washington, D.C., USA TODAY found 175 hospitals reporting full intensive care units as of Feb. 25. A total of 302 hospitals reported more COVID-19 patients in the ICU compared with the previous week, and 493 had more COVID-19 patients overall. Though still dire, these numbers have fallen drastically since the beginning of the year.”

NBC News: Ripe for extortion? Navajo Nation hospital targeted by large-scale ransomware hack

NBC News: Ripe for extortion? Navajo Nation hospital targeted by large-scale ransomware hack. “Last year, at least 560 health care facilities were infected with ransomware, according to a survey from the cybersecurity company Emsisoft. In October, amid a particularly brutal wave of attacks, several federal agencies issued warnings of ‘an increased and imminent cybercrime threat’ to hospitals. An advisory from the American Hospital Association laid out how the Covid-19 pandemic had encouraged cybercriminals ‘to exploit, victimize and profit’ from ransomware attacks.”

#YearofCOVID: The Evolution of Care (Cedars-Sinai)

Cedars-Sinai: #YearofCOVID: The Evolution of Care. “Peter Chen, MD, remembers those early days of March 2020 as one of swirling hyperactivity in the intensive care unit he leads at Cedars-Sinai. Chen and his team were struggling to respond to an emerging health crisis that was quickly growing into a global pandemic. In California, the rapidly spreading novel coronavirus prompted state officials to shutter all but essential businesses and services, close schools and order everyone to shelter in place. People fashioned bandanas into face masks to protect themselves. As the weeks went by, frightened patients streamed into hospital emergency rooms, and deaths began mounting in intensive care units and nursing homes.”

The Journal (Ireland): Misleading videos of ’empty’ hospitals being shared on social media are putting extra strain on health service, say hospitals

The Journal (Ireland): Misleading videos of ’empty’ hospitals being shared on social media are putting extra strain on health service, say hospitals. “STAFF AT A number of hospitals around the country have criticised videos on anti-Covid 19 social media pages which suggest that hospitals are secretly ‘empty’, describing them as wrong and misleading.”

WSB-TV: Forgotten blueprints of segregated hospitals in Georgia brought to light

WSB-TV: Forgotten blueprints of segregated hospitals in Georgia brought to light. “On the campus of Kennesaw State University, a disturbing era of Georgia history is now in plain view. ‘There were separate waiting rooms. Separate pharmacies. Entrances. Everything,’ Helen Thomas said. Thomas oversees the university archives. Along with the Digital Library of Georgia at the University of Georgia, she has gone online with the blueprints of hospitals built in the state during the 1940′s and 50′s.”

New York Times: How Full Are Hospital I.C.U.s Near You?

New York Times: How Full Are Hospital I.C.U.s Near You?. “Almost one-fifth of U.S. hospitals with intensive care units reported that at least 95 percent of their I.C.U. beds were full in the week ending Dec. 24. Nationwide, 78 percent of intensive care hospital beds were occupied. See how the pandemic has affected recent hospital capacity in the map below, which shows data reported by individual hospitals. Health officials said that the data should not discourage sick people from seeking care.”

‘Small Town, No Hospital’: Covid-19 Is Overwhelming Rural West Texas (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘Small Town, No Hospital’: Covid-19 Is Overwhelming Rural West Texas. “Out past the seesawing oil pumpjacks of Midland and Odessa, where roadrunners flit across two-lane roads and desert shrubs freckle the long, beige horizon, the Big Bend region of Texas is one of the most remote parts of the mainland United States and one of the least equipped to handle an infectious disease outbreak. There is just one hospital for 12,000 square miles and no heart or lung specialists to treat serious cases of Covid-19. But in a sign that the virus is surging nearly everywhere, the counties that include Big Bend ranked among the top 20 in the nation last week for the most new cases per capita.”

Covid-19: Explosion kills nine coronavirus patients in Turkey (BBC)

BBC: Covid-19: Explosion kills nine coronavirus patients in Turkey. “Nine people have been killed after an oxygen ventilator exploded at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in southern Turkey, officials say. The blast caused a fire in the intensive care unit of the private Sanko University Hospital in Gaziantep, the local governor’s office said. At least one of the patients died while being transferred to another hospital.”

The Atlantic: The U.S. Has Passed the Hospital Breaking Point

The Atlantic: The U.S. Has Passed the Hospital Breaking Point. “The pandemic nightmare scenario—the buckling of hospital and health-care systems nationwide—has arrived. Several lines of evidence are now sending us the same message: Hospitals are becoming overwhelmed, causing them to restrict whom they admit and leading more Americans to die needlessly.”

DCist: How A Network Of Homes For Adults With Disabilities Has Managed To Keep COVID At Bay

DCist: How A Network Of Homes For Adults With Disabilities Has Managed To Keep COVID At Bay. “[Hazel] Pulliam is part of L’Arche, a community of people with and without intellectual disabilities who live together in group homes within an interdenominational Christian community. L’Arche operates four of these homes, with two each in D.C. and Arlington. Each house supports two to four residents — or ‘core members,’ as the organization calls them — along with their caretakers, some of whom live in the homes as well. Since the pandemic began, L’Arche has kept all four of its homes, including its 14 residents and their assistants, COVID-19 infection-free — no small feat, considering that shared housing and congregate settings face greater challenges when preventing the spread of the virus. ”

KGW 8: Here’s how to check hospital capacity during the COVID-19 pandemic

KGW 8: Here’s how to check hospital capacity during the COVID-19 pandemic. “The federal government released a nationwide database that allows anyone interested in hospital capacity to take a look. You can find the database here. Those who are comfortable working with Excel and other spreadsheet software will have no problems finding what they need. For the rest of us, the database appears a bit confusing.”

Washington Post: Inside a hospital as the coronavirus surges: Where will all the patients go?

Washington Post: Inside a hospital as the coronavirus surges: Where will all the patients go?. “As the coronavirus pandemic swelled around the 160-bed Mayo Clinic hospital, the day was dawning auspiciously. Two precious beds for new patients had opened overnight. At the morning ‘bed meeting,’ prospects for a third looked promising. Better yet, by midmorning, there were no patients in the Emergency Department. None. Even in normal times, a medium-size hospital like this can go many months without ever reaching zero. Everyone knew better than to trust this good fortune. They were right.”

“We Don’t Even Know Who Is Dead or Alive”: Trapped Inside an Assisted Living Facility During the Pandemic (ProPublica)

ProPublica: “We Don’t Even Know Who Is Dead or Alive”: Trapped Inside an Assisted Living Facility During the Pandemic. “In the last four decades, demand for assisted living has soared. The paradigm promises residents the freedom to live autonomously — and operators freedom from regulation. Unlike nursing homes, assisted living facilities are not subject to federal oversight. The standards for care — along with the definition of ‘assisted living’ — vary greatly from state to state (and from facility to facility). During the pandemic, these freedoms have become liabilities.”