Washington Post: ‘We’re going to take care of you, okay?’

Washington Post: ‘We’re going to take care of you, okay?’. “Across the country, the vaccination campaign against the novel coronavirus was picking up speed. The Biden administration was on the verge of securing 100 million more doses, and a few states were even starting to offer shots to the general population. But on a Thursday morning in March, Alabama lagged with one of the worst vaccination rates in the country, as well as one of the worst racial disparities nationally among those receiving the shots, and now a group of community clinics called Cahaba Medical Care was trying to turn those numbers around.”

Gothamist: Why COVID-19 Is Surging In New Jersey But Flat In New York

Gothamist: Why COVID-19 Is Surging In New Jersey But Flat In New York. “The difference may be due to vaccine disparities. About 14% of the state’s 8.8 million residents have been fully vaccinated in New Jersey, and more than 3.6 million doses have been administered. But Black and Latino residents in the state are getting inoculated at much lower rates—5% and 7%, respectively—compared to white residents. Latinos make up about 21% of the population and Black residents about 15%.”

Politico: Major donors to South Florida hospital foundation got early vaccine access

Politico: Major donors to South Florida hospital foundation got early vaccine access. “The fundraising foundation for the Baptist Health of South Florida hospital system told donors who could afford at least six-figure financial contributions on New Year’s Day that they were eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine, at a time when vaccine doses were in short supply in the rest of the state.”

The Grio: Everything they ‘forgot’ to tell Black people about contracting COVID-19

The Grio: Everything they ‘forgot’ to tell Black people about contracting COVID-19. “Our nation is suffering, but only a portion of the population (read: Black and brown people) is simultaneously bearing the weight of this pandemic with a healthcare system that values profit over people and a rightful distrust of government-funded vaccinations. This is a recipe for disaster at the macro-level, but when you zoom in to the very personal view, it is even scarier to experience.”

CBS News: Kamala Harris announces $250 million in funding to help address COVID response inequities

CBS News: Kamala Harris announces $250 million in funding to help address COVID response inequities. “Vice President Kamala Harris is announcing Monday that the Biden administration will invest $250 million in federal grants to community organizations that work to address gaps in the response to COVID-19, according to an official at the Health and Human Services Department (HHS). In remarks to the National League of Cities, Harris will announce the funding, which is targeted at organizations that are encouraging underserved and minority populations to get COVID-19 vaccinations and adopt safety practices to help them avoid contracting the virus.”

Route Fifty: Covid-19 Revealed How Sick the U.S. Health Care Delivery System Really is

Route Fifty: Covid-19 Revealed How Sick the U.S. Health Care Delivery System Really is. “If you got the COVID-19 shot, you likely received a little paper card that shows you’ve been vaccinated. Make sure you keep that card in a safe place. There is no coordinated way to share information about who has been vaccinated and who has not. That is just one of the glaring flaws that COVID-19 has revealed about the U.S. health care system: It does not share health information well.”

ABC News: ‘Pharmacy deserts’ are new front in the race to vaccinate for COVID-19

ABC News: ‘Pharmacy deserts’ are new front in the race to vaccinate for COVID-19. “Even though 90% of Americans live within 3 miles of chain pharmacies, there are many others who live in so-called food and health care deserts, without a single grocery store or pharmacy in close range, said Dr. James Hildreth, president and CEO of Meharry Medical College and a member of Biden’s COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force.”

A Better Measuring Stick: Algorithmic Approach To Pain Diagnosis Could Eliminate Racial Bias (ScienceBlog)

ScienceBlog: A Better Measuring Stick: Algorithmic Approach To Pain Diagnosis Could Eliminate Racial Bias. “Among the many mysteries in medical science, it is known that minority and low-income patients experience greater pain than other parts of the population. This is true regardless of the root cause of the pain and even when comparing patients with similar levels of disease severity. Now, a team of researchers, including Stanford computer scientist Jure Leskovec, has used AI to more accurately and more fairly measure severe knee pain.”

SHAPE: This Woman Created a “For Us, By Us” Platform to Connect BIPOC with Culturally Competent Physicians

SHAPE: This Woman Created a “For Us, By Us” Platform to Connect BIPOC with Culturally Competent Physicians. “African Americans are more likely to die of natural causes at any age and younger Black people are experiencing diseases and disorders that are most commonly diagnosed amongst the elderly, including diabetes, high blood pressure, and strokes, according to the CDC. In an effort to address these health disparities, Kimberly Wilson created HUED, an online database that connects Black and Latinx patients with doctors of color.”

Mashable: The CDC website has a trove of vaccine data, revealing progress — and inequity

Mashable: The CDC website has a trove of vaccine data, revealing progress — and inequity. “It has been heartening to see vaccine numbers go up and up since the new year. Even with much more progress needed to reach herd immunity, those data points and percentages represent real people protecting themselves and their family members from COVID. As of this writing, over 80 million vaccine doses had been distributed to Americans. Unfortunately, the outlook is not as sunny if you dive deeper into some of the data.”

New York Times: Where Do Vaccine Doses Go, and Who Gets Them? The Algorithms Decide

New York Times: Where Do Vaccine Doses Go, and Who Gets Them? The Algorithms Decide. “The algorithms are intended to speed Covid-19 shots from pharmaceutical plants to people’s arms. The formulas generally follow guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending that frontline health care workers, nursing home residents, senior citizens and those with major health risks be given priority for the vaccines. Yet federal agencies, states, local health departments and medical centers have each developed different allocation formulas, based on a variety of ethical and political considerations. The result: Americans are experiencing wide disparities in vaccine access.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines

University of Wisconsin-Madison: UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines. “The demand for COVID-19 vaccines continues to outpace supply, forcing public health officials to decide who should be first in line for a shot, even among those in the same pool of eligible vaccine recipients. To assist these efforts, researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health have developed a tool that incorporates a person’s age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs. The tool helps identify those who are at greater risk of severe complications or death from COVID-19.”

Los Angeles Times: They know the sick. On Navajo Nation, contact tracers work to control coronavirus on vast lands

Los Angeles Times: They know the sick. On Navajo Nation, contact tracers work to control coronavirus on vast lands. “More than a third of COVID-19 deaths in New Mexico are among Native Americans, who make up 11% of the state’s population. To date, 17,700 Navajo, out of nearly 175,000 who live on the reservation, have contracted the virus and nearly 700 on the reservation have died from complications. Navajo Nation government officials have said in recent days that intensive care unit beds are at 100% capacity.”