BuzzFeed News: Medical Experts Are Becoming Influencers Amid All The Anxiety Over Monkeypox

BuzzFeed News: Medical Experts Are Becoming Influencers Amid All The Anxiety Over Monkeypox. “COVID introduced us to the virus influencer: doctors and science writers on Twitter and Instagram who built huge social profiles — many of which translated into media appearances — by sharing news, information, and takes on an unknown virus during a history-defining pandemic. And now, with monkeypox having been declared a public health emergency, we’re seeing a similar shift, and many sensationalist medical experts have dominated the conversation as people search for answers.”

News @ Northwestern: Twitter health amplifiers combat COVID-19 misinformation

News @ Northwestern: Twitter health amplifiers combat COVID-19 misinformation. “At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, when false information about the virus began to spread on Twitter, physicians and scientists from Northwestern Medicine and other institutions banded together to combat the deadly misinformation and disinformation and support one another when they ultimately were attacked online for doing so.”

US Department of Defense: Veterans in Medical, Emergency Fields Sought for Oral History Collection

US Department of Defense: Veterans in Medical, Emergency Fields Sought for Oral History Collection. “It has often focused on the experiences of veterans in war, including Medal of Honor recipients and many who made the ultimate sacrifice. But in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s now looking to highlight stories from the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service — officers defined as veterans when they’ve completed their service — as well as Armed Forces service members who were deployed to natural disasters, national emergencies and public health crises.”

The Guardian (UK): Doctors could soon face action over ‘misleading’ social media posts

The Guardian (UK): Doctors could soon face action over ‘misleading’ social media posts. “Doctors who share ‘misleading’ information on social media could face regulatory action, according to planned new guidelines. Posts made on Twitter, Instagram and TikTok are among those that could be scrutinised by the General Medical Council (GMC) if a doctor is reported. The council is to update its Good Medical Practice guide, seen by some as a modern-day Hippocratic Oath, for the first time in almost a decade.”

The Olive Press: Madrid hospital worker masterminded database fraud to register ‘anti-vaxxers’ in Spain for Covid-19 certificates

The Olive Press: Madrid hospital worker masterminded database fraud to register ‘anti-vaxxers’ in Spain for Covid-19 certificates. “The Prensa Iberica newspaper group has discovered that the man worked as a nursing assistant at the La Paz General Hospital in Madrid. He’s accused of making over €200,000 for accessing the National Vaccination database to get hundreds of people registered for receiving Covid-19 vaccines despite not getting them because of their ‘anti-vax’ stance.”

ProPublica: Vaccine Medical Exemptions Are Rare. Thousands of Nursing Home Workers Have Them.

ProPublica: Vaccine Medical Exemptions Are Rare. Thousands of Nursing Home Workers Have Them.. “Although few reasons exist for claiming a medical exemption, nearly 20,000 nursing home workers nationwide, or about 1 in 100, have obtained them, according to a ProPublica analysis of federal data. That rate is three times that of nursing home residents, a notably vulnerable group, who didn’t get the vaccine for medical reasons.”

‘I felt like I was drowning’: Exhausted and burned out, nurses are leaving their jobs in droves (Boston Globe)

Boston Globe: ‘I felt like I was drowning’: Exhausted and burned out, nurses are leaving their jobs in droves. “During the peaks of the pandemic, nurses witnessed the suffering and death that COVID can bring. They held the hands of dying patients. They worried about becoming sick themselves, or bringing the virus home to their families. And sometimes, instead of gratitude, patients in the throes of illness responded with abuse. At first, nurses said, adrenaline kept them going. But when COVID receded, other sick patients flooded hospitals. There was no time for health care workers to rest. With each successive surge of the virus, more experienced nurses have opted to leave. And the conditions for those who remained have become even worse.”

Chicago Tribune: Two years. 33,000 dead. Tracing the pandemic’s toll across Illinois and one doctor’s family.

Chicago Tribune: Two years. 33,000 dead. Tracing the pandemic’s toll across Illinois and one doctor’s family.. “It was the early weeks of the pandemic. A mystery illness was spreading across the Chicago area. And Dr. Sandra McGowan-Watts felt powerless. She was a family doctor but could do little as her husband and mother-in-law fell ill. Her mother-in-law soon died. Her husband clung to life for a week longer before the virus claimed him too, at age 51. ‘I’m a doctor,’ she said last week, the pain fresh in her voice. “I’m supposed to be able to fix people and change things, and I can’t even help the person I love the most.””

San Francisco Chronicle: Here’s why hospital nurses, the pandemic’s ‘health care heroes,’ are so ticked off

San Francisco Chronicle: Here’s why hospital nurses, the pandemic’s ‘health care heroes,’ are so ticked off. ” Understaffing at Bay Area hospitals predates the pandemic, but two years of COVID-19 have made it worse. All told, hospitals in California are short the equivalent of more than 40,000 full-time nurses, a UCSF study reported in August. That’s almost 14% fewer than needed, a shortage the researchers expect to last until 2026 when enough nursing students graduate to match pre-COVID levels. Older nurses are leaving the profession faster than new ones can begin, and many in mid-career say they can’t wait to leave, the study found.”

STAT News: Doctors often turn to Google Translate to talk to patients. They want a better option

STAT News: Doctors often turn to Google Translate to talk to patients. They want a better option. “‘I do think it is the future,’ said Breena Taira, a clinical emergency medicine researcher at UCLA Health whose recent study evaluated Google-translated discharge instructions in seven languages. Tech giants like Google and Microsoft, which have invested heavily in voice recognition software, have expressed interest in exploring medical translation. ‘We just have to be really aware of what the limitations are,’ Taira said, including significantly lower accuracy rates for languages that aren’t widely spoken.”