PsyPost: Slow government response to COVID-19 linked to higher burnout and lower wellbeing in frontline workers

PsyPost: Slow government response to COVID-19 linked to higher burnout and lower wellbeing in frontline workers. “A new study from researchers from the University of Gloucestershire’s HERA Lab and the University of Limerick’s RISE Lab has found that the resilience, burnout, and wellbeing levels of frontline keyworkers in the UK and Ireland are being affected by different factors. It has been widely reported that the UK’s relatively slow response into initiating lockdown measures has had an impact on morbidity and mortality from COVID-19, and there is now evidence to suggest that this slower response has also had a negative impact on frontline workers’ resilience, burnout, and wellbeing.”

A Parallel Pandemic Hits Health Care Workers: Trauma and Exhaustion (New York Times)

New York Times: A Parallel Pandemic Hits Health Care Workers: Trauma and Exhaustion. “Dr. Sheetal Khedkar Rao, 42, an internist in suburban Chicago, can’t pinpoint the exact moment when she decided to hang up her stethoscope for the last time. There were the chaos and confusion of the spring, when a nationwide shortage of N95 masks forced her to examine patients with a surgical mask, the fears she might take the coronavirus home to her family and the exasperating public disregard for mask-wearing and social distancing that was amplified by the White House. Among the final blows, though, were a 30 percent pay cut to compensate for a drop in patients seeking primary care, and the realization that she needed to spend more time at home after her children, 10 and 11, switched to remote learning.”

‘The country needs me:’ cleaner in Chicago’s COVID wards proud to fight pandemic (Reuters)

Reuters: ‘The country needs me:’ cleaner in Chicago’s COVID wards proud to fight pandemic. “Throughout the northern hemisphere spring, as the coronavirus ravaged through international cities, residents of Rome, Madrid, New York City and beyond took to their balconies to applaud frontline medical workers who, often overlooked in non-pandemic years, had become symbols of sacrifice in terrifying times. Ten months and over a million and a half global deaths later, nurses and doctors continue to risk their lives every day as they report to the hospitals. Yet, their ability to work has relied on a less visible category of frontline staff: cleaners and janitors like [Evelia] De La Cruz.”

From healthcare worker to patient: Death in Room 311 (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: From healthcare worker to patient: Death in Room 311. “Case No. 09567 died alone in an overheated hotel room in West Covina. She was a surgical tech at Emanate Health Queen of the Valley Hospital. She had tested positive for the coronavirus and was in isolation at the Days Inn by Wyndham on busy East Garvey Avenue South. She was scheduled to check out Oct. 13, but she never made it down to the lobby. She did not answer her phone or respond to repeated knocking on her door. When the manager let herself into Room 311, she found the 58-year-old lying on the bed. A pillow covered her legs. Her right hand rested on her abdomen. MSNBC played on the television set.”

NPR: Think Health Care Workers Are Tested Often For The Coronavirus? Think Again

NPR: Think Health Care Workers Are Tested Often For The Coronavirus? Think Again. “In a recent roundtable with Joe Biden, nurse Mary Turner told the president-elect something he found surprising: ‘Do you know that I have not been tested yet?’ said Turner, who is president of the Minnesota Nurses Association. ‘And I have been on the front lines of the ICU since February.’ ‘You’re kidding me!’ Biden replied. She wasn’t kidding.”

KSN: As virus spreads, Kansas hospital runs out of staff

KSN: As virus spreads, Kansas hospital runs out of staff. “The radiology technician slept in an RV in the parking lot of his rural Kansas hospital for more than a week because his co-workers were out sick with COVID-19 and no one else was available to take X-rays. A doctor and physician assistant tested positive on the same day in November, briefly leaving the hospital without anyone who could write prescriptions or oversee patient care. The hospital is full, but diverting patients isn’t an option because surrounding medical centers are overwhelmed.”

Washington Post: Nursing home staffers attended a 300-person superspreader wedding. Now six residents have died.

Washington Post: Nursing home staffers attended a 300-person superspreader wedding. Now six residents have died.. “Last month, more than 300 people packed into a wedding near rural Ritzville, Wash., defying state restrictions. Authorities later traced more than a dozen coronavirus cases and two outbreaks to the ceremony — and warned the fallout would probably get worse. Now, health officials say the wedding also included some guests whose job is caring for among the most vulnerable to coronavirus: nursing-home residents. At least six residents have now died of covid-19 at two nursing homes where staffers tested positive for the virus after attending the wedding, the local department announced in a Thursday news release.”

As thousands of athletes get coronavirus tests, nurses wonder: What about us? (Washington Post)

Washington Post: As thousands of athletes get coronavirus tests, nurses wonder: What about us?. “As sports lurched back to life over the summer, health experts debated the ethics of entire leagues jumping to the front of the testing line. But ultimately the leagues, with billions of revenue dollars at stake, contracted with private labs to pay for the best and fastest tests available — a luxury many hospitals and other healthcare providers, reeling from the pandemic, can’t afford.”

Covid Combat Fatigue: ‘I Would Come Home With Tears in My Eyes’ (New York Times)

New York Times: Covid Combat Fatigue: ‘I Would Come Home With Tears in My Eyes’. “About 2 a.m. on a sweltering summer night, Dr. Orlando Garner awoke to the sound of a thud next to his baby daughter’s crib. He leapt out of bed to find his wife, Gabriela, passed out, her forehead hot with the same fever that had stricken him and his son, Orlando Jr., then 3, just hours before. Two days later, it would hit their infant daughter, Veronica. Nearly five months later, Dr. Garner, a critical care physician at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, is haunted by what befell his family last summer: He had inadvertently shuttled the coronavirus home, and sickened them all.”

Univadis: Medical Royal College launches healthcare worker COVID-19 archive

Univadis: Medical Royal College launches healthcare worker COVID-19 archive. “The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh (RCPE) has launched a COVID-19 digital archive, which documents the experiences of healthcare workers living and working through the pandemic. This ongoing archiving project includes a range of materials such as diaries, photographs, and interviews – providing an important record of the professional and personal impact of the pandemic on healthcare workers, according to the College.”

Pioneer Press: 900 on Mayo Clinic staff have contracted coronavirus in last two weeks

Pioneer Press: 900 on Mayo Clinic staff have contracted coronavirus in last two weeks. “Over 900 Mayo Clinic staff have contracted COVID-19 in the past two weeks, according to a Tuesday briefing by Dr. Amy Williams, dean of clinical practice. Williams said that 93 percent of staff who have contracted the virus did so in the community — away from the job — and that the majority of those who contracted the virus at work did so while eating in a break room with a mask off.”

The Atlantic: Hospitals Can’t Go On Like This

The Atlantic: Hospitals Can’t Go On Like This. “At The Atlantic’s request, HHS provided data on the number of hospitals experiencing staffing shortages. From November 4 to November 11, 958 hospitals—19 percent of American hospitals—faced a staffing shortage. This week, 1,109 hospitals reported that they expect to face a staffing shortage. That’s 22 percent of all American hospitals. In eight states, the situation is even more dire.”