AP: US medical supply chains failed, and COVID deaths followed

AP: US medical supply chains failed, and COVID deaths followed. “The Associated Press and ‘FRONTLINE’ launched a seven-month investigation — filing Freedom of Information Act requests, testing medical masks, interviewing dozens of experts from hard-hit hospitals to the White House — to understand what was behind these critical shortages. Medical supply chains that span oceans and continents are the fragile lifelines between raw materials and manufacturers overseas, and health care workers on COVID-19 front lines in the U.S. As link after link broke, the system fell apart.”

CNN: 28-year-old Houston doctor dies after battle with coronavirus, family says

CNN: 28-year-old Houston doctor dies after battle with coronavirus, family says. “Adeline Fagan, a second year OBGYN resident living in Houston, died early Saturday after a couple months-long battle with Covid-19, her family announced in a post on a GoFundMe page established on her behalf. Fagan had just started her second year of residency in Houston when she got sick, the GoFundMe page said.”

‘Covid Will Not Win’: Meet the Force Powering Brooklyn Hospital (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘Covid Will Not Win’: Meet the Force Powering Brooklyn Hospital. “During the surge of Covid-19 cases this spring that filled Brooklyn Hospital’s emergency room and intensive care unit with the critically ill and the dying, the staff went in day after day, trying to save as many lives as they could. Now they are bracing for a second wave. These portraits of the hospital staff were taken during the grueling first wave. In interviews in recent months, the workers reflected on that period — what they had lived through and how they had coped, what they had learned and how it had changed them.”

Slate: We Should Have Treated COVID as a Natural Disaster, Not a Public Health Emergency

Slate: We Should Have Treated COVID as a Natural Disaster, Not a Public Health Emergency. “When I talk to friends who work in emergency rooms across the country, some in hot spots, the general feeling is of exhaustion and abandonment. For a while, we were lauded as front-line heroes (how I have grown to hate that term) and given free meals, but that didn’t stop our pay from being cut with most of the rest of America’s; nor did it stop the endless litany of indignities that characterize the normal workday in an emergency department.”

Coronavirus: Health worker investigated by employer after posting conspiracy video (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Health worker investigated by employer after posting conspiracy video. “A worker at a major NHS provider is under investigation by her employer for posting a video on social media in which she claimed that Covid-19 does not exist.”

Kaiser Health News: As Georgia Reopened, Officials Knew of Severe Shortage of PPE for Health Workers

Kaiser Health News: As Georgia Reopened, Officials Knew of Severe Shortage of PPE for Health Workers. “As the coronavirus crisis deepened in April, Georgia officials circulated documents showing that to get through the next month, the state would need millions more masks, gowns and other supplies than it had on hand. The projections, obtained by KHN and other organizations in response to public records requests, provide one of the clearest pictures of the severe PPE deficits states confronted while thousands fell ill from rising COVID-19 cases, putting health workers at risk.”

The home front: Virus stalks nurses after they leave work (Associated Press)

Associated Press: The home front: Virus stalks nurses after they leave work. “There’s red tape running along the floor of the coronavirus unit at St. Jude’s Medical Center in Fullerton, California. It’s a clear line of demarcation. On one side, the cold zone, where only a surgical mask, scrubs and shoe coverings are necessary. On the other, the warm zone, where the gloves come on. And the N95 mask. And the gown. And the hairnet. And the face shield. Another step through glass doors and it’s into the hot zone, where coughing patients in green-patterned gowns await. It’s outside this unit, in an area not marked by red tape or glass doors, that worries the nurses of ‘4 North’ most.”

Google Blog: Portraits of healthcare heroes on Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Portraits of healthcare heroes on Google Arts & Culture. “In March, the UK locked down the country to contain the spread of COVID-19. For many this led to a heightened period of dread and anxiety, but also creativity and heroism. During lockdown artist Tom Croft created #portraitsforNHSheroes to galvanize artists across the country to celebrate workers on the frontline. Tom collaborated with the charity Paintings in Hospitals to give the collection a more permanent home, as it closely aligns with the values and ethos of their mission to improve health through art. As a result of the collaboration, Google Arts & Culture created an online exhibition of over 700 contemporary portraits that were submitted as part of Tom’s #portraitsforNHSheroes initiative.”

Philadelphia Tribune: Over 900 health care workers have died from coronavirus. A new database tells their stories

Philadelphia Tribune: Over 900 health care workers have died from coronavirus. A new database tells their stories. “Of the nearly 165,000 Americans who’ve died from the coronavirus, at least 900 reportedly were health care workers. Now, the life stories of frontline physicians, nurses, clinical support staff and cleaners are being compiled in a new interactive database from Kaiser Health News and the Guardian US.”

Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic. “Peru is letting thousands of Venezuelan health workers who fled their country join the Peruvian health system during the coronavirus pandemic. Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra signed a decree which exempts qualified foreign doctors and nurses from having to validate their degrees. Peru has more than 430,000 cases of coronavirus and its health service has been struggling.”

Washington Post: Houston, Miami, other cities face mounting health care worker shortages as infections climb

Washington Post: Houston, Miami, other cities face mounting health care worker shortages as infections climb. “Shortages of health care workers are worsening in Houston, Miami, Baton Rouge and other cities battling sustained covid-19 outbreaks, exhausting staffers and straining hospitals’ ability to cope with spiking cases. That need is especially dire for front-line nurses, respiratory therapists and others who play hands-on, bedside roles where one nurse is often required for each critically ill patient.”

AP: Virus hits frontline workers in taxed public health system

AP: Virus hits frontline workers in taxed public health system. “As a veteran public health worker, Chantee Mack knew the coronavirus could kill. She already faced health challenges and didn’t want to take any chances during the pandemic. So she asked — twice — for permission to work from home. She was deemed essential and told no. Eight weeks later, she was dead.”

UCSF study shows health workers grappling with pandemic anxiety: ‘It’s exhausting’ (San Francisco Chronicle)

San Francisco Chronicle: UCSF study shows health workers grappling with pandemic anxiety: ‘It’s exhausting’. “Dr. Robert Rodriguez’s anxiety rises and falls with the number of coronavirus cases and deaths. Fear that he could get infected at his San Francisco General Hospital job, or bring the virus home, affects his sleep. He doesn’t hug his 16-year-old son as much. Other worried family members avoid interacting with him. The stress isn’t sustainable, he said.”

Exclusive: Over 15,000 frontline workers tested positive for coronavirus in India (India Today)

India Today: Exclusive: Over 15,000 frontline workers tested positive for coronavirus in India. “The total number of frontline workers and health care staff who got affected by coronavirus stands at 15,200 in India, reveals unreleased government data accessed by India Today through sources. Sources said that of the total, more than 5000 are health care workers who have tested positive for Covid-19 while on duty.”

University of North Carolina: ‘Heroes Health’ mental wellness app launched by School of Medicine and UNC Health

University of North Carolina: ‘Heroes Health’ mental wellness app launched by School of Medicine and UNC Health. “The UNC School of Medicine and UNC Health have launched the Heroes Health Initiative to help support the mental health of first responders and health care workers during the COVID-19 global pandemic. The app is available through the App Store/Google Play Store in the United States, free of charge to first responders, health care workers and their organizations.”