Alaska Public Media: Alaska’s COVID hospitalizations have hit a new high

Alaska Public Media: Alaska’s COVID hospitalizations have hit a new high . “The state of Alaska logged 1,024 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, continuing its ranking as the state with the highest case rate in the nation. The state is also seeing its highest number of COVID-19 hospitalizations since the pandemic began. On Thursday, there were 242 patients with the coronavirus in Alaska hospitals, 30 of them on ventilators. Roughly 1 in 5 patients in Alaska has COVID-19. On a Zoom call with reporters, Alaska Chief Medical Officer Dr. Anne Zink noted that the hospitalizations aren’t necessarily all Alaska residents, some are nonresidents hospitalized in the state.” That seems very low compared to many other states, but remember Alaska’s population is less than 750,000.)

Covid: Doctors call for Covid Plan B to start in England (BBC)

BBC: Covid: Doctors call for Covid Plan B to start in England. “An ‘unacceptable’ level of Covid cases means ministers should trigger their Plan B for the pandemic in England, doctors say. The British Medical Association accused the government of being ‘wilfully negligent’ for not reimposing Covid rules such as mandatory face masks. Daily UK infections have been above 40,000 for eight days in a row.”

PRNewswire: FAIR Health Launches Interactive Maps Showing State-by-State COVID-19 Hospitalization and Treatment Costs (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: FAIR Health Launches Interactive Maps Showing State-by-State COVID-19 Hospitalization and Treatment Costs (PRESS RELEASE). “Today FAIR Health is launching a set of free, online, interactive maps displaying typical costs for COVID-19 treatment and hospitalization state by state across the nation. Part of FAIR Health’s ‘States by the Numbers’ series, the COVID-19 Medical and Hospitalization Costs by State tool shows average and median costs, both in-network and out-of-network, for three different COVID-19 treatment pathways.”

New York Times: Will New Covid Treatments Be as Elusive for Poor Countries as Vaccines?

New York Times: Will New Covid Treatments Be as Elusive for Poor Countries as Vaccines?. “Nearly a year after the first Covid-19 vaccination campaigns began, the vast majority of the shots have gone to people in wealthy nations, with no clear path toward resolving the disparity. News this month that an antiviral medication had proved effective against the coronavirus in a large clinical trial has brought new hope of a turning point in the pandemic: a not-too-distant future when a simple pill could keep infected people from dying or falling severely ill.”

Mother Jones: Utah Protesters Claim Hospitals Are Killing People Who Have COVID

Mother Jones: Utah Protesters Claim Hospitals Are Killing People Who Have COVID. “Greg Johnson is standing on the corner of State Street in suburban Salt Lake City, Utah, holding a neatly stenciled sign that says, ‘COVID-19 Protocols Killed My Uncle.’ Behind him looms the Intermountain Medical Center, the largest hospital in the region. Johnson is one of about 30 people who’ve come to protest Saturday because they believe that the hospital is murdering people with the coronavirus by putting them on ventilators, injecting them with the anti-viral Remdesivir, and refusing to give them intravenous vitamin C or the deworming drug Ivermectin.”

Washington Post: Vaccine mandates stoked fears of labor shortages. But hospitals say they’re working.

Washington Post: Vaccine mandates stoked fears of labor shortages. But hospitals say they’re working.. “At Houston Methodist — one of the first American health-care institutions to require workers to get vaccinated against the coronavirus — the backlash was short-lived. More than 150 employees were fired. There were legal battles and protests. But President and CEO Marc Boom has no regrets: 98 percent of staff have been vaccinated, and they and patients are safer as a result, he said.”

Cal Matters: Hospitals brace for strikes as California workers protest staff shortages

Cal Matters: Hospitals brace for strikes as California workers protest staff shortages. “As weary health care workers across California enter the 19th month of the pandemic, thousands are walking off the job and onto the picket line, demanding more staffing. The strikes and rallies threaten to cripple hospital operations that have been inundated by the COVID-19 Delta surge as well as patients seeking long-delayed care.”

48 hours to live: An Oklahoma hospital’s rush to find an ICU bed for a covid patient (Washington Post)

Washington Post: 48 hours to live: An Oklahoma hospital’s rush to find an ICU bed for a covid patient. “Robin Pressley, transfer coordinator at Stillwater Medical Center, was working fast to try to find an ICU bed at a larger hospital for Johnnie Novotny, a 69-year-old retired gas plant operator who had developed a hematoma and needed more specialized care than doctors at this modest rural hospital could provide. Pressley knew that other hospitals in the region were already choked with covid patients due to a summer surge driven by the highly infectious delta variant and the state’s large numbers of unvaccinated residents, like Novotny. But she also knew that Novotny’s life depended on her success.”

‘Emotionally, physically, mentally tired’: Nurses say morale has hit a pandemic low (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘Emotionally, physically, mentally tired’: Nurses say morale has hit a pandemic low. “In interviews, nurses across the country describe plummeting morale during the latest pandemic surge, marked by utter exhaustion and growing workloads. Some thought the availability of coronavirus vaccines would alleviate the burden on hospitals. Instead, emergency rooms were swamped this summer and early fall, often filled with the young and unvaccinated. The crisis has exacerbated staffing problems that existed before the pandemic, leaving nurses shouldering increasing responsibilities as covid-19 patients fill their units. Some nurses are leaving hospital jobs for more lucrative travel nursing positions. Others are leaving the profession altogether.”

“Do we need to ration care?”: COVID patients overwhelm Montana hospitals (CBS News)

CBS News: “Do we need to ration care?”: COVID patients overwhelm Montana hospitals. “Montana, the first state to ban COVID-19 mandates for employees, has one of the lowest vaccination rates and the highest hospitalization rates in the country. Some hospitals have reached the point of not accepting new patients and are preparing to ration care. The intensive care unit at Billings Clinic is operating at 175% capacity. ”

PBS News: Rural U.S. hospitals stretched thin after nurse shortage exacerbated by the pandemic

PBS News: Rural U.S. hospitals stretched thin after nurse shortage exacerbated by the pandemic. “Nursing shortages are impacting healthcare workers and hospitals across the United States. In just the past few days, nurses and other workers in Southern California and Oregon authorized a potential strike against provider Kaiser Permanente. Staffing shortages are part of those disputes. John Yang reports from South Florida on how shortages are affecting hospitals there.”

Free Malaysia Today: Thailand reviving medical tourism amid coronavirus pandemic

Free Malaysia Today: Thailand reviving medical tourism amid coronavirus pandemic. “With the Thai government planning to reopen the country to foreign tourists as part of its strategy of learning to live with Covid, Thai businesses aim to offer Covid-related services as well as revive medical tourism. The upscale Bumrungrad International Hospital has launched its first Covid-19 recovery clinic, offering all Covid solutions to affluent Thais and foreigners, as the government prepares to reopen the country roughly by November.”

Associated Press: Kaiser Permanente suspends 2,200 unvaccinated employees

Associated Press: Kaiser Permanente suspends 2,200 unvaccinated employees. “Health care giant Kaiser Permanente has put more than 2,200 employees nationwide on unpaid leave who have chosen not to get vaccinated against the coronavirus — a little over 1% of its workforce. The employees have until Dec. 1 to get vaccinated to be able to return to work and those who choose not to will be terminated, the company said. Kaiser said its overall vaccination rate stands at 92%.”