A Fight Between Facebook And The British Medical Journal Highlights The Difficulty Of Moderating ‘Medical Misinformation’ (Techdirt)

Techdirt: A Fight Between Facebook And The British Medical Journal Highlights The Difficulty Of Moderating ‘Medical Misinformation’. “Forcing down misinformation leads to all sorts of dangerous consequences. Hell, we saw this in China, where such a law was used to silence a doctor who tried to raise the alarm about COVID-19, and was forced to apologize for spreading ‘untruthful information online.’ But there’s another aspect of this which people rarely try to deal with: content moderation involves a lot of very gray areas and an awful lot of context, much of which may not be immediately obvious.”

Listerine: Listerine Usage Guidelines And COVID-19

Listerine: Listerine Usage Guidelines And COVID-19. “LISTERINE® Antiseptic is an antimicrobial mouthwash that is clinically proven to kill germs that cause plaque, bad breath and the early gum disease, gingivitis. LISTERINE® Antiseptic is not intended to prevent or treat COVID-19 and should be used only as directed on the product label.”

NBC News: Covid vaccine holdouts are caving to mandates — then scrambling to ‘undo’ their shots

NBC News: Covid vaccine holdouts are caving to mandates — then scrambling to ‘undo’ their shots. “Detox remedies and regimens have been staples of the anti-vaccine movement for years. Long before Covid, anti-vaccine influencers and alternative health entrepreneurs promoted unproven and sometimes dangerous treatments they claimed would rid children of the alleged toxins that lingered after routine childhood immunizations.”

PubMed: Quality Evaluation of Consumer Health Information Websites Found on Google Using DISCERN, CRAAP, and HONcode

PubMed: Quality Evaluation of Consumer Health Information Websites Found on Google Using DISCERN, CRAAP, and HONcode. “Online health misinformation is a growing problem, and health information professionals and consumers would benefit from an evaluation of health websites for reliability and trustworthiness. Terms from the Google COVID-19 Search Trends dataset were searched on Google to determine the most frequently appearing consumer health information websites. The quality of the resulting top five websites was evaluated. The top five websites that appeared most frequently were WebMD, Mayo Clinic, Healthline, MedlinePlus, and Medical News Today, respectively.”

The Oregonian: Oregon Medical Board revokes license of doctor who bucked COVID guidelines, spread misinformation

The Oregonian: Oregon Medical Board revokes license of doctor who bucked COVID guidelines, spread misinformation. “The Oregon Medical Board revoked the license of a Dallas doctor earlier this month after he refused to follow COVID-19 guidelines in his office, spread misinformation about masks and over-prescribed opioids to his patients, according to medical board documents. The board also fined Steven Arthur LaTulippe $10,000 on Sept. 2.”

Poynter: Thalidomide, morning-sickness drug that caused disabilities, wasn’t FDA-approved for pregnant women

Poynter: Thalidomide, morning-sickness drug that caused disabilities, wasn’t FDA-approved for pregnant women. “Thalidomide was widely prescribed to pregnant mothers around the world before it was shown to cause thousands of cases of babies born with disabilities, such as missing and malformed limbs. But the post gets a key fact wrong: The FDA didn’t approve thalidomide for pregnant women.”

San Diego Union-Tribune: San Diego County calls medical misinformation a health crisis after 15-hour debate

San Diego Union-Tribune: San Diego County calls medical misinformation a health crisis after 15-hour debate. “After a 15-hour-long, sometimes rancorous meeting, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors Tuesday approved a measure declaring medical misinformation a public health crisis. The board voted 3-2 after more than 250 people signed up and most spoke against the motion, saying it would lead to restrictions on free speech and other violations of personal freedoms.”

CNET: Coronavirus ‘doomsday variant’ headlines are wrong — and dangerous

CNET: Coronavirus ‘doomsday variant’ headlines are wrong — and dangerous. “In short, there’s no reason to panic. There’s no doomsday variant (we don’t name variants this way) and there’s little evidence this new mutant strain is worse than delta. ‘There is no evidence it is particularly transmissible and it has not been flagged as a variant under interest so far,’ says Francois Balloux, a computational biologist at University College London.”

Editorial: Step away from the livestock meds. The Pfizer vaccine just got full approval. (Houston Chronicle)

Houston Chronicle: Editorial: Step away from the livestock meds. The Pfizer vaccine just got full approval.. “News flash: Livestock medicines have not been approved for human consumption by the FDA. But on Monday morning, the FDA announced that the two-dose Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, which more than half of all vaccinated Americans have received, had earned full authorization for people 16 and older.”

New York Times: Health officials warn people not to treat Covid with a drug meant for livestock.

New York Times: Health officials warn people not to treat Covid with a drug meant for livestock.. “Ivermectin, an anti-parasitic drug commonly used for livestock, should not be taken to treat or prevent Covid-19, the Food and Drug Administration said on Saturday. The warning came a day after the Mississippi State Department of Health issued a similar statement in response to reports that an increasing number of people in Mississippi were using the drug to prevent a Covid infection.”

Poynter: Science shows mask-wearing is largely safe for children

Poynter: Science shows mask-wearing is largely safe for children. “What does science say about whether masks can cause harm for the wearer? Generally, we found that concerns about significant negative impacts on breathing aren’t well supported. Worries about masks interfering with communication and serving as a barrier to social connection in the classroom may be more reasonable, experts say.”