New York Times: How to Recover From Covid-19 at Home

New York Times: How to Recover From Covid-19 at Home. “My husband and I got sick from the coronavirus in late March. We had so-called mild cases, meaning only that we weren’t hospitalized: In fact, we were sicker than we had ever been. Because we could breathe fine, we knew we weren’t supposed to go to the hospital. But what were we supposed to do? The standard advice — rest, fluids and fever reducers — was and is essential, but at times it felt inadequate to the severity of the illness. As we recovered, I spoke with many friends, colleagues and internet strangers going through similar ordeals. Here is some collective wisdom on how to manage noncritical cases of Covid-19.”

Wired: Metaphors Matter in a Time of Pandemic

Wired: Metaphors Matter in a Time of Pandemic. “The virus has upset the human microbiome in an epochal act of strategic surprise. Almost instantly, that shock generated a set of metaphors drawn from warfare. This may be inevitable in a time of great fear. But more useful models for confronting a pandemic may come from the microbiome itself—and from the mechanisms, from human care to life-extending machines, used to give our immune systems time to learn the signatures of a new virus.”

CNET: Instagram’s new guide feature will help you find wellness content

CNET: Instagram’s new guide feature will help you find wellness content. “Instagram debuted a new Guides feature on Monday with the goal of making new wellness content a little easier to find. The guide lets Instagram users discover recommendations, tips and other content from creators, public figures, organizations and publishers.”

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows. “A team of researchers in part led by H. Andrew Schwartz, PhD, Assistant Professor of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, along with Sharath Chandra Guntuku, PhD, a research scientist in Penn Medicine’s Center for Digital Health, compared patients’ Facebook posts to their medical records, which showed that a shift to more formal language and/or descriptions of physical pain, among other changes, reliably preceded hospital visits.”

The Scientist: Can Social Media Inform Public Health Efforts?

The Scientist: Can Social Media Inform Public Health Efforts?. “On March 14, 2014, HealthMap—an online database created by researchers at Boston’s Children’s Hospital in 2006 to collect accounts of disease cases from various online sources—notified scientists of an article written in French about cases of a ‘strange fever’ in Macenta, Guinea. Nine days later, the World Health Organization officially announced an Ebola outbreak in the area.”

BelfastLive: Queen’s University finds social media is actually good for young people’s health

BelfastLive: Queen’s University finds social media is actually good for young people’s health. “Despite numerous reports about the negative impact the online world can have on users, a new study has found the sites have a significant positive effect on a range of teenage health behaviours. The research team from Queen’s University , in partnership with University of Southern California, has found social media messaging, such as Facebook posts and sponsored ads, have a significant positive effect.”

‘Alexa, Monitor My Heart’: Researchers Develop First Contactless Cardiac Arrest AI System for Smart Speakers (Newswise)

Newswise: ‘Alexa, Monitor My Heart’: Researchers Develop First Contactless Cardiac Arrest AI System for Smart Speakers. “Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new tool to monitor people for cardiac arrest while they’re asleep without touching them. A new skill for a smart speaker— like Google Home and Amazon Alexa — or smartphone lets the device detect the gasping sound of agonal breathing and call for help..”

EurekAlert: Johns Hopkins researchers publish digital health roadmap

EurekAlert: Johns Hopkins researchers publish digital health roadmap. “In the dizzying swirl of health-related websites, social media and smartphone apps, finding a reliable source of health information can be a challenge. A group of researchers from the Johns Hopkins University schools of medicine and public health, as well as the university’s Applied Physics Laboratory, have mapped out a course to navigate that complicated landscape.”

TechCrunch: Want to know where epidemics are flaring up around the world? Metabiota has the tool for you

TechCrunch: Want to know where epidemics are flaring up around the world? Metabiota has the tool for you. “In an effort to inform the public of the health risks breaking out all over the world (or just to scare the bejeezus out of already paranoid people) the startup Metabiota has released a free-to-use epidemic tracker for all of the outbreaks monitored publicly around the world.”

BBC: Epilepsy charity calls for social media seizure warnings

BBC: Epilepsy charity calls for social media seizure warnings. “A growing number of people with epilepsy have said they are having seizures triggered by flashing images on social media, a charity has warned. The Epilepsy Society wants the government’s new plans to tackle ‘online harms’ to recommend warnings about flashing images on social media.”

Tracking a sensitive topic: Menstrual health in women (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Tracking a sensitive topic: Menstrual health in women. “Girls in low- and middle-income countries lack information about puberty and periods, and affordability, availability and disposal challenges mean that many ­people go without adequate ­hygiene during menstruation. It’s an issue in the United States, too, where ‘menstrual equity’ is a growing policy issue. The website gathers information on menstrual health education and products and innovations designed to address these challenges. Highlights include a database of research studies related to menstrual health management and a thoughtful roundup of settled issues and ongoing debates in the field.”

Tech Xplore: Computing scientists use machine learning to track health trends on Twitter

Tech Xplore: Computing scientists use machine learning to track health trends on Twitter. “A new machine learning tool, developed by University of Alberta computing scientists, sifts through millions of Twitter posts to help understand health and wellness trends in Alberta and across Canada.”