The Register: Google’s Pixel phones to measure heart rate and breathing, other ‘droids coming soon

The Register: Google’s Pixel phones to measure heart rate and breathing, other ‘droids coming soon. “Google has announced that its own Pixel Android phones will soon gain the power to measure users heart rate and respiratory rate. With the help of the Google Fit app, Pixel phones will measure breaths if users ‘place your head and upper torso in view of your phone’s front-facing camera and breathe normally.’”

SaltWire Network: ‘Queering Cancer’ website creates community for LGBTQ+ cancer patients

SaltWire Network: ‘Queering Cancer’ website creates community for LGBTQ+ cancer patients. “With help from colleagues at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., and the University of Alberta, [Evan] Taylor created the ‘Queering Cancer’ website . The online support system includes a peer support forum, patient stories and a searchable database of cancer resources specific to LGBTQ2+ people.”

NPR: Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine

NPR: Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine. “About a quarter of the American public is hesitant to get a COVID-19 vaccine. That number goes up to a third of Black Americans, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll last month. The hesitancy is rooted in real mistreatment and fanned by myths and misinformation. As NPR’s Pien Huang reports, some Black doctors are finding creative ways to encourage vaccine acceptance.”

New York Times: How 700 Epidemiologists Are Living Now, and What They Think Is Next

New York Times: How 700 Epidemiologists Are Living Now, and What They Think Is Next. “Even with coronavirus vaccines on the way, many epidemiologists do not expect their lives to return to pre-pandemic normal until most Americans are vaccinated. In the meantime, most have eased up on some precautions — now going to the grocery store or seeing friends outdoors, for example — but are as cautious as ever about many activities of daily life.”

New York Times: How to Recover From Covid-19 at Home

New York Times: How to Recover From Covid-19 at Home. “My husband and I got sick from the coronavirus in late March. We had so-called mild cases, meaning only that we weren’t hospitalized: In fact, we were sicker than we had ever been. Because we could breathe fine, we knew we weren’t supposed to go to the hospital. But what were we supposed to do? The standard advice — rest, fluids and fever reducers — was and is essential, but at times it felt inadequate to the severity of the illness. As we recovered, I spoke with many friends, colleagues and internet strangers going through similar ordeals. Here is some collective wisdom on how to manage noncritical cases of Covid-19.”

Wired: Metaphors Matter in a Time of Pandemic

Wired: Metaphors Matter in a Time of Pandemic. “The virus has upset the human microbiome in an epochal act of strategic surprise. Almost instantly, that shock generated a set of metaphors drawn from warfare. This may be inevitable in a time of great fear. But more useful models for confronting a pandemic may come from the microbiome itself—and from the mechanisms, from human care to life-extending machines, used to give our immune systems time to learn the signatures of a new virus.”

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows

Stony Brook News: Facebook Offers Clues to Medical Distress, Research Shows. “A team of researchers in part led by H. Andrew Schwartz, PhD, Assistant Professor of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, along with Sharath Chandra Guntuku, PhD, a research scientist in Penn Medicine’s Center for Digital Health, compared patients’ Facebook posts to their medical records, which showed that a shift to more formal language and/or descriptions of physical pain, among other changes, reliably preceded hospital visits.”

The Scientist: Can Social Media Inform Public Health Efforts?

The Scientist: Can Social Media Inform Public Health Efforts?. “On March 14, 2014, HealthMap—an online database created by researchers at Boston’s Children’s Hospital in 2006 to collect accounts of disease cases from various online sources—notified scientists of an article written in French about cases of a ‘strange fever’ in Macenta, Guinea. Nine days later, the World Health Organization officially announced an Ebola outbreak in the area.”

BelfastLive: Queen’s University finds social media is actually good for young people’s health

BelfastLive: Queen’s University finds social media is actually good for young people’s health. “Despite numerous reports about the negative impact the online world can have on users, a new study has found the sites have a significant positive effect on a range of teenage health behaviours. The research team from Queen’s University , in partnership with University of Southern California, has found social media messaging, such as Facebook posts and sponsored ads, have a significant positive effect.”

‘Alexa, Monitor My Heart’: Researchers Develop First Contactless Cardiac Arrest AI System for Smart Speakers (Newswise)

Newswise: ‘Alexa, Monitor My Heart’: Researchers Develop First Contactless Cardiac Arrest AI System for Smart Speakers. “Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new tool to monitor people for cardiac arrest while they’re asleep without touching them. A new skill for a smart speaker— like Google Home and Amazon Alexa — or smartphone lets the device detect the gasping sound of agonal breathing and call for help..”