FDAAA Trials Tracker: leaderboard for pharma companies that break FDA clinical trial rules (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: FDAAA Trials Tracker: leaderboard for pharma companies that break FDA clinical trial rules. “The US government currently requires all trials to be registered on ClinicalTrials.gov when they start — trials that aren’t reported in at their commencement are not eligible for consideration during FDA evaluation; and since ClinicalTrials.gov is public, it should be possible for the public and watchdogs to discover whether pharma companies are reporting in on all their trials. That’s where FDAAA Trials Tracker comes in: it downloads an XML dump from ClinicalTrials.gov, analyzes it, and tracks which trials are due or overdue, as well as ‘whether they have reported results in accor- dance with the law; give performance statistics for each individual trial sponsor; and calculate potential fines that could have been levied by the FDA against sponsors.'”

Ill-Conceived, Well Drawn-and Powerful: Graphic Medicine Exhibition Debuts at NLM (NLM In Focus)

NLM in Focus: Ill-Conceived, Well Drawn-and Powerful: Graphic Medicine Exhibition Debuts at NLM. “Dozens of images are now online in Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well-Drawn!, a multi-formatted exhibition which explores this increasingly popular genre and showcases the National Library of Medicine’s growing collection of graphic medicine works. Curated by Seattle cartoonist and educator Ellen Forney, author of the New York Times bestselling graphic novel Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me, the new exhibition introduces the genre, discussing who creates graphic medicine, how it conveys meaning, and its impact on readers and creators.”

Gizmodo: Microsoft Wants To Diagnose Disease By Building Massive Database Of The Human Immune System

Gizmodo: Microsoft Wants To Diagnose Disease By Building Massive Database Of The Human Immune System. “Imagine making a spreadsheet of every meal you’ve ever eaten, every hand you’ve ever shook, every bit of dust that’s ever gotten in your eye – and multiply it by about a million times. Then you begin to get a sense of the size of the data problem that is your body’s immune system. Through a new AI project, Microsoft hopes to solve this data problem and make diagnosing nearly any disease as simple as a single blood test.”

EurekAlert: Incorporating social media reviews can improve surveillance of restaurant health problems

EurekAlert: Incorporating social media reviews can improve surveillance of restaurant health problems. “A recent paper published in JAMIA, Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, illustrates the success of an improved system that tracks foodborne illness via online Yelp restaurant reviews developed by the Columbia University Department of Computer Science. Since 2012 this system has been used by the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) to identify instances of foodborne illness in NYC restaurants.”

Tulane University: Twitter chats can promote healthy behaviors, study says

Tulane University: Twitter chats can promote healthy behaviors, study says. “Looking for ways to keep health-related resolutions, like weight loss and healthy eating? Social media might help. Conversations on Twitter can lead to engaged, two-way communication about health, according to a recent study published by the Tulane Prevention Research Center (PRC) and its partners at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).”

A saving breath: The history of respiratory care (Washington Post)

New-to-me, from The Washington Post: A saving breath: The history of respiratory care. “Stethoscopes. CPR. Oxygen tanks. All make it possible for doctors to diagnose and treat conditions of the lungs, including tuberculosis and other diseases that claimed millions of lives before advances in respiratory medicine and therapy. There’s a fascinating history here. You can delve into that history — and learn more about the researchers and medical professionals who help people catch their breath today — at the American Association for Respiratory Care’s online museum.”

University of Southern California: Fake social media accounts can be hazardous to your health

University of Southern California: Fake social media accounts can be hazardous to your health. “Fake social media accounts already have a reputation of swaying political discourse, but a Keck School of Medicine of USC researcher says these automated accounts are even more dangerous — they can be bad for your health. Social bots are automated accounts that use artificial intelligence to influence discussions and promote specific ideas or products. USC researchers focused on how these bots promoted the notion that using electronic cigarettes helps people stop smoking, a conclusion not definitively supported by research.”