The Next Web: Dubious claims that AI outperforms doctors pose risk to ‘millions of patients,’ study finds

The Next Web: Dubious claims that AI outperforms doctors pose risk to ‘millions of patients,’ study finds. “AI‘s ability to analyze X-rays, MRIs, and other scans has led it to be hyped up as the future of medical imaging. But patients remain reluctant to use it, as they believe only humans can understand their unique needs. Turns out they might be right.”

Becker’s Hospital Review: Vanderbilt develops EHR data-mining tool to identify disease associations

Becker’s Hospital Review: Vanderbilt develops EHR data-mining tool to identify disease associations. EHR in this case stands for Electronic Health Record. “Nashville, Tenn.-based Vanderbilt University engineers created a new tool that can identify disease co-morbidities by analyzing de-identified EHR data and medical diagnosis codes, according to a Feb. 18 news release. The toolkit, called Phenome-Disease Association Study, uses machine learning algorithms to perform association studies and identify disease co-morbidities across time in EHRs.”

ProPakistani: Maroof International Hospital Hit with Severe Ransomware Attack

ProPakistani: Maroof International Hospital Hit with Severe Ransomware Attack. “Maroof International Hospital Islamabad’s entire computer network has been compromised in the wake of a massive ransomware attack. Maroof is one of the most expensive private hospitals in Islamabad.”

New York Academy of Medicine Launches Hospital Postcard Pilot Project

The New York Academy of Medicine has launched a new collection of hospital postcards. (Thanks for letting me know, Carrie!) “This pilot project represents a small portion of the NYC sub-collection of the Robert Matz Hospital postcards digitized by the New York Academy of Medicine Library. It showcases 118 hospital postcards from New York City. Hospitals from all five boroughs (Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island) are represented, including public, private, not-for-profit, government, and military hospitals.” The entire collection is about 2000 postcards.

Ars Technica: Why is the healthcare industry still so bad at cybersecurity?

Ars Technica: Why is the healthcare industry still so bad at cybersecurity?. “Many articles about cybersecurity risks in healthcare begin with descriptions of live simulations (so when in Rome). Imagine a doctor completely unaware of what they’re walking into triaging two patients: one in need of a hospital cardiac catheterization lab after an irregular electrocardiogram (EKG) reading, the other suffering from a stroke and needing a CT scan. All systems are down due to ransomware, so the physician working through the scenario can’t access electronic health records or use any of the assessment methods modern medicine is so reliant on. So, what to do?” Incredibly deep dive. If you’re at all interested in security issues around health care, I urge you to read this article.

Tubefilter: The FDA Is Studying Influencers Who Endorse Healthcare Products

Tubefilter: The FDA Is Studying Influencers Who Endorse Healthcare Products. “The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is probing the world of influencers who endorse healthcare products. In a proposal published Jan. 28, the agency said it’s already conducted two related studies. One concluded that more people buy drugs and products endorsed by physicians, pharmacists, and other consumers than drugs endorsed by celebrities. The other found that consumers think expert endorsers are more credible than celebrities, but pay the same amount of attention to ads from both.”

It’s not just Google: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM get hospital data, too (Mashable)

Mashable: It’s not just Google: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM get hospital data, too. “The public freaked out in November 2019 at the Wall Street Journal’s revelations that Google was taking in non-anonymous healthcare information from hospital network Ascension. Now, a new report from the Journal shows that the tech giant is far from alone: Microsoft, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and IBM also have data-sharing agreements with hospitals. The scope of work spelled out in those agreements allows for some information to be shared that could identify patients, too.”