Bloomberg: Herd Immunity May Be Developing in Mumbai’s Poorest Areas

Bloomberg: Herd Immunity May Be Developing in Mumbai’s Poorest Areas. “Around six in ten people living in some of India’s biggest slums have antibodies for the novel coronavirus indicating they’ve recovered from infection, in what could be one of the highest population immunity levels known worldwide. The findings, from a July serological survey of 6,936 people across three suburbs in India’s financial center of Mumbai, may explain why a steep drop in infections is being seen among the closely-packed population, despite new cases accelerating overall in the hard-hit country.”

CNET: Can herd immunity help stop coronavirus? What we know now

CNET: Can herd immunity help stop coronavirus? What we know now. “Let’s explore what herd immunity looks like, what it means for COVID-19 and how the world can get there, explained by Dr. Jane Orient, executive director of the American Association of Physicians and Surgeons; Dr. Joseph Vinetz, a Yale Medicine infectious disease specialist; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

New York Times: Can You Get Covid-19 Again? It’s Very Unlikely, Experts Say

New York Times: Can You Get Covid-19 Again? It’s Very Unlikely, Experts Say. “It may be possible for the coronavirus to strike the same person twice, but it’s highly unlikely that it would do so in such a short window or to make people sicker the second time, they said. What’s more likely is that some people have a drawn-out course of infection, with the virus taking a slow toll weeks to months after their initial exposure.”

The Atlantic: How Long Does COVID-19 Immunity Last?

The Atlantic: How Long Does COVID-19 Immunity Last?. “Terrified, I read the study that launched a thousand headlines—and did not come away much less terrified. Researchers at King’s College London had tested more than 90 people with COVID-19 repeatedly from March to June. Several weeks after infection, their blood was swimming with antibodies, which are virus-fighting proteins. But two months later, many of these antibodies had disappeared…. I called several scientists to talk me through the study and ease my apocalyptic anxiety. Their response: Please calm down—but don’t expect us to make you feel entirely relaxed.”

Vox: My patient caught Covid-19 twice. So long to herd immunity hopes.

Vox: My patient caught Covid-19 twice. So long to herd immunity hopes.. “‘Wait. I can catch Covid twice?’ my 50-year-old patient asked in disbelief. It was the beginning of July, and he had just tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, for a second time — three months after a previous infection. While there’s still much we don’t understand about immunity to this new illness, a small but growing number of cases like his suggest the answer is ‘yes.'”

Business Insider: Sweden’s prime minister orders an inquiry into the failure of the country’s no-lockdown coronavirus strategy

Business Insider: Sweden’s prime minister orders an inquiry into the failure of the country’s no-lockdown coronavirus strategy. “Sweden’s prime minister has ordered an inquiry into the country’s decision not to impose a coronavirus lockdown after the country suffered thousands more deaths than its closest neighbours.”

Business Insider: Sweden’s ‘herd immunity’ hopes are fading as only a small fraction of the population has coronavirus antibodies

Business Insider: Sweden’s ‘herd immunity’ hopes are fading as only a small fraction of the population has coronavirus antibodies. “Sweden’s soft approach to the coronavirus has resulted in only a small portion of the population developing antibodies to the virus. This means the country appears highly unlikely to tackle the virus by achieving herd immunity. A new study published this week showed that just 6.1% of Sweden’s population had developed coronavirus antibodies by late May, a lower measure than some of its health agency’s earlier models had predicted.”

Bloomberg: Sweden Proves ‘Surprisingly Slow’ in Achieving Herd Immunity

Bloomberg: Sweden Proves ‘Surprisingly Slow’ in Achieving Herd Immunity. “Sweden has made less progress than expected in achieving immunity to the coronavirus, according to its state epidemiologist. After leaving schools, shops and restaurants open throughout the pandemic, contagion rates in Sweden are much higher than anywhere else in the Nordic region. Its Covid-19 mortality rate is among the worst in the world. Scientists have been eager to learn whether the flipside of widespread contagion is a higher level of immunity.”

World Health Organization: “Immunity passports” in the context of COVID-19

World Health Organization: “Immunity passports” in the context of COVID-19. “WHO has published guidance on adjusting public health and social measures for the next phase of the COVID-19 response.1 Some governments have suggested that the detection of antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, could serve as the basis for an ‘immunity passport’ or ‘risk-free certificate’ that would enable individuals to travel or to return to work assuming that they are protected against re-infection. There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection.”

Herd immunity: What it is and how it can help stop COVID-19 (CNET)

CNET: Herd immunity: What it is and how it can help stop COVID-19. “The problem with herd immunity and the novel coronavirus is that the world is nowhere close to having widespread resistance to COVID-19, and is still a long way from developing it. Experts estimate that from 60% to upwards of 90% of a population must have immunity to a disease for it to stop spreading. Most countries affected by COVID-19 have not surpassed the 1% mark, including the US, which currently has the highest number of cases out of all countries. Let’s explore what herd immunity looks like, what it means for COVID-19 and how the world can get there, explained by Dr. Jane Orient, executive director of the American Association of Physicians and Surgeons, Dr. Joseph Vinetz, a Yale Medicine infectious disease specialist, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

UPI: Social media platforms move to stem vaccine misinformation

UPI: Social media platforms move to stem vaccine misinformation. “Doubts about vaccines, fueled by inaccurate information, could be fracturing the benefits of herd immunity brought on by vaccine acceptance, experts say. Platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and YouTube have been used to spread misinformation about the perceived dangers of getting immunized and have started taking action to stem it.”