Saving history: 3D laser scans preserve world heritage sites (Big Think)

Big Think: Saving history: 3D laser scans preserve world heritage sites. “Throughout history, countless artifacts have been caught in the crossfires of war, deliberately targeted by iconoclasts or swallowed up by the indifferent forces of nature and time. As a result, numerous non-profit groups and agencies — most notably, UNESCO — have sprung up to prevent the present from erasing the past. But while even the most well protected monument remains at risk of being physically destroyed, we now have a way to preserve them digitally.”

The Post and Courier: South Carolina nonprofit creates archive of Palmetto State landmarks

New-to-me, and apparently revamped to all our benefit, from The Post and Courier: South Carolina nonprofit creates archive of Palmetto State landmarks. “Today, its website features entries on over 2,000 landmarks. Most are still standing, but the project also catalogues locations that have fallen to ruin or disappeared. In addition to photographs, entries include write-ups adding historical context to the sites, along with addresses, links to similar landmarks and information about any other notable places nearby.”

Floornature Architecture & Surfaces: Winners of the 5th European Award for Architectural Heritage Intervention

Floornature Architecture & Surfaces: Winners of the 5th European Award for Architectural Heritage Intervention. “The winners of the 5th European Award for Architectural Heritage Intervention, a prize awarded every two years in four categories, with a special mention for restoration, were announced a few days ago. The winning projects stand out for their ability to demonstrate great sensitivity, care and respect.”

American Academy in Rome: AAR Receives Major Gift of Photographs of Ancient Roman Sites by Carole Raddato

Thanks to Esther S. for sending this my way. From the American Academy in Rome: AAR Receives Major Gift of Photographs of Ancient Roman Sites by Carole Raddato. “The American Academy in Rome (AAR) announced that photographer Carole Raddato has gifted the core of her vast collection—some 30,000 digital images—to the AAR Library to ensure its long-term preservation and continued access to scholars. The gift represents the most important collection of images of antiquity to come to the Academy since Ernest Nash’s Fototeca Unione was formed in 1956, and is the first to consist of photos taken wholly in the twenty-first century.”