Colorado Travel Office: Colorado Tourism Office Spotlights State’s 26 Scenic And Historic Byways Through New Microsite

Colorado Travel Office: Colorado Tourism Office Spotlights State’s 26 Scenic And Historic Byways Through New Microsite. “Colorado has the most America’s Byways® – the highest designation a byway can receive – of any state in the nation. A newly-launched microsite developed by the CTO features each of the 26 byways with a collection of traveler resources including an overview video, travel itinerary, trip tips, side-trip recommendations and a photo slideshow.”

Northern Arizona University: Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona endowment to support NAU’s Cline Library, preserve historical records

Northern Arizona University: Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona endowment to support NAU’s Cline Library, preserve historical records . “Route 66 is more than just a road—it’s a representation of Arizona’s history and its future. The Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona is committed to the preservation of the mother road and all the memories that come along with it. In keeping with its mission, the association made a gift of $50,000 to the Northern Arizona University Foundation to establish an endowment that will help to preserve, protect and promote Arizona’s Route 66 history.”

County 17: Wyo Parks And Cultural Resources Puts M&Ms On The Interactive Map

County 17: Wyo Parks And Cultural Resources Puts M&Ms On The Interactive Map. “Wyoming State Parks and Cultural Resources recently announced a new searchable Monuments and Markers Interactive Map to help roadtrippers navigate the state’s historic markers with informational signage at historical points of interest along the state’s highways and at nearby national monuments.”

University of Kansas: Kansas rocks! Online tool from Geological Survey invites deeper exploration of state’s highways and byways

University of Kansas: Kansas rocks! Online tool from Geological Survey invites deeper exploration of state’s highways and byways. “The mobile-friendly ‘Highways & Byways to Kansas Geology’ website leads users on a geological tour of the state’s roadways with a scrolling format known as a story map. It explores what natural features like rock formations, wetlands and colorfully layered roadcuts reveal about the evolution of the ground beneath our feet and the cultural history of the people who settled and passed through the state.” What a cool idea.

Government Technology: States Contribute Images for 270K Miles of Roads to Database

Government Technology: States Contribute Images for 270K Miles of Roads to Database. “Hundreds of thousands of miles of roadways in Arizona and a number of other states are part of a growing network of images detailing guardrails, street-signage, striping and other features central to understanding and improving highway safety.”

Route Fifty: Finding History Along the Highway

Route Fifty: Finding History Along the Highway. “A one-inch grey pipe stem excavated by Maryland state archeologists doesn’t look like much. But this artifact dug up on a site near a rural stretch of highway eventually led to an important clue about the lives of enslaved people in the state about 200 years ago. DNA found inside the stem was identified as belonging to a woman and linked to people currently living in Sierra Leone—a rare breakthrough in using genetic testing to uncover the history of people divorced from their homelands in West Africa when forced onto slave ships.”

Driven crazy: Google Maps deletes one lane of M4 (Metro)

Metro: Driven crazy: Google Maps deletes one lane of M4. “CONFUSED motorists were left scratching their heads today after Google Maps appeared to accidentally delete an entire lane of the M4. The glitch saw 1.5 miles of the westbound carriageway simply vanish. It would have meant drivers directed to leave the motorway and take B roads on a 10-mile detour through the countryside.”

Seattle Times: New online archive lets you explore Seattle’s 50-year-old ‘Freeway Revolt’

Seattle Times: New online archive lets you explore Seattle’s 50-year-old ‘Freeway Revolt’. “What do University of Washington students, Montlake homeowners, the League of Women Voters and the Black Panther Party have in common? Their coalition resisted a Seattle plan in the late 1960s for freeways through the Central Area, Rainier Valley, South Lake Union and Lake City, during the golden age of automobile travel and three years after new Interstate 5.”

Free to Use and Reuse: John Margolies Photographs of Roadside America (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Free to Use and Reuse: John Margolies Photographs of Roadside America. “Over the span of nearly 40 years, Margolies took more than 11,000 color-slide photographs of vernacular structures across America’s highways, byways and main streets. Traversing the country, he was drawn to the architecture that came to define travel by car—motels, diners and gas stations—but also to quintessentially American oddities: buildings in the shape of dinosaurs, the sculpted concrete and plaster obstacles of miniature golf courses and parks featuring attractions from parrots to petrified rocks.”

National Geographic: He Collected 12,000 Road Maps—Now We’re Discovering Their Secrets

An amazing story from National Geographic: He Collected 12,000 Road Maps—Now We’re Discovering Their Secrets. “Robert Berlo got hooked on maps at an early age. As a kid growing up in San Francisco he’d pore over roadmaps in the backseat of the car on family vacations. Sometime around age 11 he started collecting them. By the time Berlo died in 2012 at 71 he’d amassed more than 12,000 roadmaps and atlases. But he did more than covet and collect them. Over the decades, Berlo spent countless hours mining his maps for data, creating tables, charts, graphs, and still more maps on everything from transportation systems to the population history of small towns. Now, Berlo’s collection is getting another life as a repository of previously hidden information.”

MassDOT Teams Up With Waze

The Massachusetts DOT and Waze are teaming up. “Under the program, Waze provides MassDOT with real-time, anonymous, Waze-generated incident and motorist slow-down information. In exchange, MassDOT provides real-time government-reported construction, crash and road closure data to Waze. The Waze map evolves with every driver and data point it receives providing users with information about potential traffic delays, advanced notice of major traffic events and promotes safety.”