PR Newswire: ParkServe Database and Interactive Mapping Website Unveiled by The Trust for Public Land (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire (again, sorry, but this looks really good): ParkServe Database and Interactive Mapping Website Unveiled by The Trust for Public Land (PRESS RELEASE). “Today, The Trust for Public Land launched http://www.ParkServe.TPL.org, providing free, easy-to-navigate access to the most comprehensive database on parks ever assembled. The site includes information for 14,000 cities with a combined population of more than 260 million. The national nonprofit organization is leading a movement to put a park or natural area within a 10-minute walk of every American, a goal which has been endorsed by more than 200 U.S. mayors.”

PSNews: Google goes bush with ACT walking tracks

PSNews: Google goes bush with ACT walking tracks. “Canberra’s walking tracks can now be enjoyed by anyone in the world following 350kms of them being added to the international Google Street View platform…. [Mick Gentleman] said highlights included views from Mount Ainslie, Mount Majura, Mount Painter, Mount Franklin, Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve, the Molonglo River, and the Honeysuckle Creek and Orroral Valley tracking stations.” Mick Gentleman is a TERRIFIC name.

Hawaii: New Hiking Website Provides Accurate And Authoritative Information

State of Hawaii: New Hiking Website Provides Accurate And Authoritative Information. “Nearly every week the local news reports on hikers who’ve gotten lost and disoriented or who have fallen and been injured or even killed. Often times these hikers were on non-sanctioned or ‘social trails’ highlighted by various social media sites and blogs. The DLNR Na Ala Hele Trail and Access System, administered by the Division of Forestry and Wildlife has introduced a newly designed trails website which provides detailed information, directions, safety considerations, announcements and closure status for more than 100 official State trails.”

Neighbor News Online: Roswell teen launches nature websites, starting Sandy Springs-based group

Neighbor News Online: Roswell teen launches nature websites, starting Sandy Springs-based group. “Mark’s new website is devoted to informing the public about little-known waterfalls that were discovered both by him and others. He estimates there are about 300 waterfalls in Georgia, and the site was set up to serve as a state database for them, especially the lesser-known ones…. He even got to name a waterfall he discovered Angelica Falls, after his mother, to honor her.”

Digital Trends: REI launches new search engine to help us #OptOutside on Black Friday

Digital Trends: REI launches new search engine to help us #OptOutside on Black Friday
. “…the retail giant will launch a new experiential search engine that is expected to go live on its website Thanksgiving weekend. A preview of this new tool is available now, but in a nutshell it will allow users to search for outdoor activities based on a specific location, type of activity, or a hashtag. The search feature is meant to inspire more people to get outdoors by collecting and displaying images from Instagram posts from anyone who uses the #OptOutside hashtag.”

Philly Voice: Philly becomes first U.S. city to map urban trails on Google Street View

Philly Voice: Philly becomes first U.S. city to map urban trails on Google Street View. “After a yearlong process covering more than 400 miles, Philadelphia is officially the first city in the United States to have its urban trail system mapped on Google Street View, the Fairmount Park Conservancy and Parks & Recreation announced Wednesday.”

San Francisco Gate: Saving historic American Indian trail trees

An old article, but the resource is new-to-me: Saving historic American Indian trail trees. “The pecan tree, more than 300 years old, stands out from the others in a forested area of Dallas, a 25-foot segment of its trunk slightly bowed and running almost parallel to the ground before jutting high into the sky. It, like numerous others across the country known as Indian marker trees or trail trees, was bent in its youth by American Indians to indicate such things as a trail or a low-water creek crossing.”