XXL: How Social Media Changed Hip-Hop in the 2010s

XXL: How Social Media Changed Hip-Hop in the 2010s. “Of course, hip-hop and social media haven’t always been so inescapably intertwined. Yet in this past decade, the two gargantuan aspects of pop culture have molded and shaped each other in ways that have left each forever changed.”

Columbia News: Community Scholar’s Mixtape Museum Is an Ode to Hip-Hop

Columbia News: Community Scholar’s Mixtape Museum Is an Ode to Hip-Hop. “Fifteen years ago, Regan Sommer McCoy looked around at the collection of mixtapes, album cover art and music industry paraphernalia overflowing her boyfriend’s Bronx apartment and thought, ‘This place could be a museum.’ Now, as McCoy finishes her third year as a Columbia Community Scholar, her Mixtape Museum is a reality and she is preparing to join the advisory board of the Universal Hip Hop Museum as a historian when it opens in the Bronx in 2023.”

Google Keyword: Hip-hop dancers show Paris in a new light on Street View

Google Keyword: Hip-hop dancers show Paris in a new light on Street View. “When I see videos of myself dancing, it’s hard to imagine that person was once a shy girl from the outskirts of Paris. Thanks to hip-hop, I’ve found my path, and now I seek to help others do the same by encouraging them to use dance as a vehicle for expression. When Google’s Street View team asked if I’d like to show Paris and its iconic Gare de Lyon train station with the world through the lens of dance, I immediately said yes. “

UPROXX: From Chance The Rapper To Nicki Minaj, How Social Media Challenges Replaced Rap Street Teams

UPROXX: From Chance The Rapper To Nicki Minaj, How Social Media Challenges Replaced Rap Street Teams. “In the early days of hip-hop, rappers used street teams to promote new albums, singles, and tours. Now, they have Instagram. As social media becomes more integrated into all of our daily lives, recording artists have also naturally incorporated it into the business of building and communicating with their fanbases. And, just as rapidly as social media itself innovated the way we debate, discuss, and interpret the world, artists have learned to leverage those online fanbases to useful real-world effect.”

Pacific Standard: A Generation of Hip-Hop Was Given Away for Free. Can It Be Archived?

Pacific Standard: A Generation of Hip-Hop Was Given Away for Free. Can It Be Archived? . “Throughout the history of hip-hop, some of the genre’s most vibrant, popular, and forward-thinking music was never for sale through traditional record company channels—and some of it was never really for sale at all: mixtapes.”

DJ Booth: Solving Rap Journalism’s Long-Standing Research Problem

DJ Booth: Solving Rap Journalism’s Long-Standing Research Problem. “Rap journalism has a research problem. Just recently, Up North Trips, a popular Twitter account, attributed the wrong release date to Soundbombing II, Albumism and The Shadow League published 30th-anniversary pieces for Special Ed’s Youngest In Charge over a month past its actual anniversary date, and even the legendary DJ Premier tweeted an erroneous date for the 30th anniversary of Gang Starr’s debut.” An interesting example of a topic where Wikipedia is broadly unhelpful, with several reference resources to use instead. Enjoyed this article a lot.

New York Times: Fab 5 Freddy’s Latest Cultural Coup? ‘The Archive of the Future’

New York Times: Fab 5 Freddy’s Latest Cultural Coup? ‘The Archive of the Future’. “When he was hopscotching between segregated poles of 1970s and ’80s New York — the uptown of Grandmaster Flash and the Rock Steady Crew; the downtown of Andy Warhol and Blondie — brokering the kind of cultural exchange that would pave the way for hip-hop’s eventual takeover, Fred Brathwaite, better known as Fab 5 Freddy, never kept a consistent diary. Instead, decades before social media, he documented the events of his daily life on film, deploying either a compact point-and-shoot camera or a Hi8 camcorder that he always kept at the ready.”