Cornell Chronicle: Paniccioli’s vast hip-hop photo archive launches online

Cornell Chronicle: Paniccioli’s vast hip-hop photo archive launches online. “Missy Elliott and Li’l Kim dressed up as anime characters, resting between takes on the set of the ‘Sock It 2 Me’ music video. Biz Markie bouncing off his chair in a dressing room of the Apollo Theater. Doug E. Fresh blowing out candles on his birthday cake that’s decorated to look like a vinyl record, as Sean ‘Puff Daddy’ Combs peers over his shoulder. These and nearly 20,000 similar images can now be viewed online as Cornell University Library launches the Ernie Paniccioli Photo Archive, a digital collection chronicling hip-hop music and culture from the 1980s to the early 2000s.”

Complex: A Toronto Hip-Hop Professor Made a Playlist of Canadian Protest Songs

Complex: A Toronto Hip-Hop Professor Made a Playlist of Canadian Protest Songs. “Even as protests against racial injustice and police brutality continue to rage on across North America this weekend, there are still some who like to claim that systemic racism somehow doesn’t exist north of the border. We don’t have to tell you how idiotic that statement is—just ask Maestro, or the many other Canadian hip-hop artists who’ve been speaking out about these issues in their music over the last three decades. Echoing these sentiments, the North Side Hip Hop Archive—an ever-growing digital collection of Canadian hip-hop history and culture, spearheaded by Mark V. Campbell, a Toronto professor—recently shared an incendiary playlist showcasing tunes of resistance by Canuck artists over the years.”

The Root: DJ D-Nice Breaks the Internet and Rallies A Parade of Stars with Daily, Nine-Hour Coronavirus Quarantine Party

The Root: DJ D-Nice Breaks the Internet and Rallies A Parade of Stars with Daily, Nine-Hour Coronavirus Quarantine Party. “Every night since last Tuesday, the in-demand deejay – and hip-hop veteran – has mastered the art of social distancing and social media with an infectious music party, aptly titled Homeschool: Club Quarantine, via Instagram Live.”

XXL: How Social Media Changed Hip-Hop in the 2010s

XXL: How Social Media Changed Hip-Hop in the 2010s. “Of course, hip-hop and social media haven’t always been so inescapably intertwined. Yet in this past decade, the two gargantuan aspects of pop culture have molded and shaped each other in ways that have left each forever changed.”

Columbia News: Community Scholar’s Mixtape Museum Is an Ode to Hip-Hop

Columbia News: Community Scholar’s Mixtape Museum Is an Ode to Hip-Hop. “Fifteen years ago, Regan Sommer McCoy looked around at the collection of mixtapes, album cover art and music industry paraphernalia overflowing her boyfriend’s Bronx apartment and thought, ‘This place could be a museum.’ Now, as McCoy finishes her third year as a Columbia Community Scholar, her Mixtape Museum is a reality and she is preparing to join the advisory board of the Universal Hip Hop Museum as a historian when it opens in the Bronx in 2023.”

Google Keyword: Hip-hop dancers show Paris in a new light on Street View

Google Keyword: Hip-hop dancers show Paris in a new light on Street View. “When I see videos of myself dancing, it’s hard to imagine that person was once a shy girl from the outskirts of Paris. Thanks to hip-hop, I’ve found my path, and now I seek to help others do the same by encouraging them to use dance as a vehicle for expression. When Google’s Street View team asked if I’d like to show Paris and its iconic Gare de Lyon train station with the world through the lens of dance, I immediately said yes. “

UPROXX: From Chance The Rapper To Nicki Minaj, How Social Media Challenges Replaced Rap Street Teams

UPROXX: From Chance The Rapper To Nicki Minaj, How Social Media Challenges Replaced Rap Street Teams. “In the early days of hip-hop, rappers used street teams to promote new albums, singles, and tours. Now, they have Instagram. As social media becomes more integrated into all of our daily lives, recording artists have also naturally incorporated it into the business of building and communicating with their fanbases. And, just as rapidly as social media itself innovated the way we debate, discuss, and interpret the world, artists have learned to leverage those online fanbases to useful real-world effect.”

Pacific Standard: A Generation of Hip-Hop Was Given Away for Free. Can It Be Archived?

Pacific Standard: A Generation of Hip-Hop Was Given Away for Free. Can It Be Archived? . “Throughout the history of hip-hop, some of the genre’s most vibrant, popular, and forward-thinking music was never for sale through traditional record company channels—and some of it was never really for sale at all: mixtapes.”

DJ Booth: Solving Rap Journalism’s Long-Standing Research Problem

DJ Booth: Solving Rap Journalism’s Long-Standing Research Problem. “Rap journalism has a research problem. Just recently, Up North Trips, a popular Twitter account, attributed the wrong release date to Soundbombing II, Albumism and The Shadow League published 30th-anniversary pieces for Special Ed’s Youngest In Charge over a month past its actual anniversary date, and even the legendary DJ Premier tweeted an erroneous date for the 30th anniversary of Gang Starr’s debut.” An interesting example of a topic where Wikipedia is broadly unhelpful, with several reference resources to use instead. Enjoyed this article a lot.

New York Times: Fab 5 Freddy’s Latest Cultural Coup? ‘The Archive of the Future’

New York Times: Fab 5 Freddy’s Latest Cultural Coup? ‘The Archive of the Future’. “When he was hopscotching between segregated poles of 1970s and ’80s New York — the uptown of Grandmaster Flash and the Rock Steady Crew; the downtown of Andy Warhol and Blondie — brokering the kind of cultural exchange that would pave the way for hip-hop’s eventual takeover, Fred Brathwaite, better known as Fab 5 Freddy, never kept a consistent diary. Instead, decades before social media, he documented the events of his daily life on film, deploying either a compact point-and-shoot camera or a Hi8 camcorder that he always kept at the ready.”

Keepers Of The Underground: The Hiphop Archive At Harvard (NPR)

NPR: Keepers Of The Underground: The Hiphop Archive At Harvard. “Over a decade ago, students of Dr. Marcyliena Morgan, then a Professor of Linguistics at UCLA, started dropping by her office, imploring her to listen to hip-hop. ‘I taught urban speech communities,’ Professor Morgan says. ‘Students said, “We want to do work on hip-hop.” I said, “That’s performance but it’s not a speech community.” They said, “We’ll be back.”‘”

New-to-Me: The Hip Hop Radio Archive

New to me: the Hip Hop Radio Archive. “The Hip-Hop Radio Archive aims to digitize, preserve, share, and contextualize recordings of hip-hop radio from the 1980s and 1990s from commercial, college, community, and pirate stations of all sizes, telling the stories of the shows and the people that made them…. This project’s primary purpose is to preserve the recordings that may only exist on cassettes recorded by fans in their bedrooms. There have been so many great music blogs over the last decade that relied on file sharing sites to spread classic hip-hop radio shows and while those sites are great for short-term sharing, they’re not a place where files will survive long-term. These sites and the files on them are in danger of just disappearing, erasing petabytes of content all at once. The Internet Archive is the solution: hosting by a non-profit organization that’s been around for over 20 years and is dedicated to digital preservation.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian Launches Kickstarter for Culture-Defining “Anthology of Hip-Hop and Rap”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian Launches Kickstarter for Culture-Defining “Anthology of Hip-Hop and Rap”. “The Smithsonian has launched a 30-day Kickstarter campaign today for the Smithsonian Anthology of Hip-Hop and Rap, a powerful cultural statement told through an unequaled combination of music, text and stunning visuals. The compilation, to be produced and released by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, includes nine CDs, more than 120 tracks and a 300-page book with extensive liner notes, essays by artists and scholars, and never-before-published photographs from the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s collection.”

XXL: Pimp C’s Wife Denies UGK Archives Were Destroyed in Hurricane Harvey

XXL: Pimp C’s Wife Denies UGK Archives Were Destroyed in Hurricane Harvey. “Chinara Butler reposted Queenie’s Instagram post about Chad’s circumstances, and although the caption wrote about UGK’s archives being destroyed, a rep for Butler tells Fader she was simply trying to post Chad’s address so others could help. The rep denies the entirety of UGK’s catalogue was destroyed and says there is no truth to that statement, being that they’re ‘in secured locations.'”