Society of Architectural Historians: Society of Architectural Historians and UVA Press Launch Open-Access SAH Archipedia

Society of Architectural Historians: Society of Architectural Historians and UVA Press Launch Open-Access SAH Archipedia. “SAH Archipedia contains histories, photographs and maps for over 20,000 structures and places, and showcases the richness and diversity of architecture and landscapes throughout the U.S. Building entries include scholar-written, peer-reviewed narrative histories, photographs, precise geospatial coordinates using Google Maps/OpenStreetMap, and structural and descriptive metadata that includes semantic tags for architects and firms, periods, styles, materials and types.”

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection. “Beijing launched a new website on Dec. 17 to provide historical, cultural and geographical information of the old sites and relics in the capital. By visiting…, people can learn about Beijing at different times in history, appreciate the intangible cultural heritages, and access the memories of the city’s well-known people.” The site is in Chinese. On a scale of 1-10 for Google Translate-ability, with 10 being best, I’d rate it a 6. It got hung up on a couple menu pages and I had to just take a random guess.

Getty Iris: Conservation and Technical Reports for Modern Buildings Now Freely Available Online

Getty Iris: Conservation and Technical Reports for Modern Buildings Now Freely Available Online. “Established in 2014, Keeping it Modern is an initiative of the Getty Foundation that supports the conservation of twentieth-century architecture around the world. Experimentation with materials and construction techniques during this era resulted in great architectural innovation, but they were often untested and have presented complex conservation challenges with age…. Now the Getty Foundation has launched the Keeping It Modern Report Library with the first 20 completed reports, free to download and use by practitioners in the field or anyone interested in cultural heritage preservation.”

The Nation (Thailand): Mahakan Fort Community to live on in the virtual world

The Nation (Thailand): Mahakan Fort Community to live on in the virtual world . “After decades of fighting to save one of the last living historic quarters of Bangkok, the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) has successfully evicted all the residents from the area. Tomorrow will be the last day that the Mahakan Fort Community physically exists. That is when all of the remaining residents will have to move out and their antique wooden houses will be torn down to make way for the construction of a public park.” The first thing I thought when I read this was, “Why do people live in a fort in Thailand? Why are they being evicted?” Lonely Planet has a bit of skinny.

This Is Colossal: Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs

This Is Colossal: Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs. “Today, views of the world’s ancient architectural wonders are firmly based in their current state of ruin, leaving to visitors’ imaginations the original glory of structures like the Parthenon, Pyramid of the Sun, and Temple of Luxor. NeoMam, in a project for Expedia, has resurrected several ancient buildings through a series of gifs.” What a simple and terrific idea!

Map Shows Historic Buildings in London

Big thanks to my Twitter buddy Steve D. for pointing out this resource: all the “listed” buildings in London in one map. “Listed” in this case means a historic property. “The map also shows the extent of our four World Heritage Sites (Greenwich, Tower, Kew and Westminster) as well as scheduled ancient monuments, historic parks and EH properties. All locations are backed up with information records.”

PCA Launches Online Archive of Materials About Building Preservation

The Property Care Association (PCA) has started an online archive of building preservation materials. “The digital document archive contains copies of records such as papers and conference records of the British Wood Preserving Association (BWPA) since 1931, and then British Wood Preserving and Damp Proofing Association (BWPDA) from 1990 onwards.” The archive is free.