Library of Congress: Papers of Ulysses S. Grant Now Online

Library of Congress: Papers of Ulysses S. Grant Now Online. “The collection includes general and family correspondence, speeches, reports, messages, military records, financial and legal records, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, memorabilia and other papers. The collection relates to Grant’s service in the Mexican War and Civil War, his pre-Civil War career, and his postwar service as U.S. secretary of war ad interim under President Andrew Johnson, his 1868 presidential campaign and two-term presidency, his unsuccessful 1880 presidential bid, his extensive international travels and the financial difficulties late in life that spurred the writing of his memoir, which he completed just days before his death from tongue cancer in July 1885. “

Computerworld UK: How the Bolshoi Theatre Museum built its massive online archive of historic documents

Computerworld UK: How the Bolshoi Theatre Museum built its massive online archive of historic documents. “The Bolshoi Theatre Museum has completed a major project to digitise a range of historical documents, with the aim of making the information publicly accessible and searchable via its website.”

NPR: An Attempt To Save South Carolina’s Historical Documents Is Destroying Them

Oh, man. From NPR: An Attempt To Save South Carolina’s Historical Documents Is Destroying Them. “When you think of an old map or manuscript, you might picture something yellowed, tattered or even torn because of how long it has been around. But millions of historic documents, from presidential papers to personal slave journals, are facing an issue apart from age: a preservation method that has backfired.”

Connecting a Cemetery’s Listings to Historical Society Holdings

Oh, what a terrific story. Cemeteries putting their plots in a database is pretty common, but you don’t hear much about cemeteries linking their listings to holdings at the local historical society. “Huling’s grave at St. Peter’s Church on Second Street is easy to find thanks to the efforts of the Lewes Historical Society. In the summer of 2003, the organization embarked on the titanic task of cataloging every single gravestone in the Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, from well-preserved gravestones in well-known church cemeteries to lesser-known, sometimes hard-to-find stones in family plots in more rural areas of the Cape Region…. The project is now moving into a new phase, as the historical society is building a new website that will connect the graves to photographs, letters and other artifacts in the society’s collection.”