Bethel University: Research Team Probes History with Cutting-Edge Tech

Bethel University: Research Team Probes History with Cutting-Edge Tech . “Building off of ideas sparked in Bethel’s Advanced Digital Humanities course, Zach Haala ’23 and Associate Professor of History Charlie Goldberg are conducting a research project to use artificial intelligence to probe historical archives for patterns. They are one of the student-faculty research teams to receive a 2021-22 Edgren Scholarship.”

Edugraph: Jadavpur University and University of Exeter join hands for digital archive of famine tales

Edugraph: Jadavpur University and University of Exeter join hands for digital archive of famine tales. “It’s a digital tale of two famines, told through art, connecting two continents with a shared history. Jadavpur University and University of Exeter, England, are collaborating on a project to document and also artistically depict the history of famines in India and Britain. The project, Famine Tales: Famine and Dearth in India and Britain 1550-1800, is being funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), UK.”

Engadget: The new Assassin’s Creed educational tour lets you explore the Viking Age

Engadget: The new Assassin’s Creed educational tour lets you explore the Viking Age. “Assassin’s Creed Discovery Tours can offer valuable educational insights into historical periods, and that may be particularly true for the latest instalment. Ubisoft has released a Discovery Tour: Viking Age update for Assassin’s Creed Valhalla that gives you the chance to explore Viking-era England and Norway without the usual conflicts. There’s a new format, however. Rather than go on guided tours and visit exhibits, you assume the roles of four Anglo-Saxon and Viking characters (such as Anglo-Saxon king Alfred the Great and a Viking merchant) as they undertake eight quests that illustrate their daily lives.” You do not have to buy the video game to get the educational tour; a stand-alone version is available for $20.

Digital Library of Georgia: The Georgia Open History Library launches today!

Digital Library of Georgia: The Georgia Open History Library launches today!. “The Georgia Open History Library is an open-access selection of single-authored scholarly titles and two multivolume series and primary documents going back to the founding of Georgia as a colony up to statehood and beyond. It is important to note that new forewords written by contemporary historians were commissioned by UGA Press for each volume in this collection, adding important current scholarly context to these materials.”

The Conversation: What happens to your life stories if you delete your Facebook account?

The Conversation: What happens to your life stories if you delete your Facebook account?. “Millions of people have invested billions of collective hours building what scholars call a networked life narrative, in which people ‘co-construct’ their social identities through their interactions with one another. Perhaps you’ve never thought about how archiving the small moments of your life would eventually amass into a large narrative of yourself. Or how interactions from your family, friends, colleagues and strangers would create meaningful dimensions of that story.”

Toronto Star: The End of History? Why we must reopen the archives

Toronto Star: The End of History? Why we must reopen the archives. “Many Canadian public archives have closed during the pandemic for reasons that are neither surprising nor frivolous. Like other parts of the public sector, archives were shuttered for the greater public good. No one wants archivists or patrons to work in unsafe conditions. But schools and libraries are figuring out how to open safely and have been open for well over a month. Why have some of Canada’s major archives been so slow to reopen?”

Fragmentology: bits of books and the medieval manuscript (Oxford University Press Blog)

Oxford University Press Blog: Fragmentology: bits of books and the medieval manuscript. “So many fragments of manuscripts exist that a new term—Fragmentology—has recently been applied to the study of these parts and parcels. Librarians, archivists, and academics are paying more attention to what can be learned about textual culture from a folio cut, say, from a twelfth-century manuscript and later used by a binder to line the oak boards of a fifteenth-century book. Scholars are thinking through ways that single leaves preserved in libraries across the world can be digitally reconstructed into a virtual representation of the (or part of the) original book as it might have been first produced.”

Digital Photography Review: Historik app uses AR to combine the modern world with historical events, landmarks

Digital Photography Review: Historik app uses AR to combine the modern world with historical events, landmarks. “Augmented reality (AR) may be modern technology, but entrepreneur Chris Whalen wants to use the tech and a new app, Historik, to bring back the past. Using a smartphone with AR capabilities, Historik can recreate historic buildings and objects at specific markers and let users learn more about the past, swipe through artifacts and even explore an old area in full 3D. Users will even be able to set up self-guided tours.”

Washington Post: Facebook is like chairs. No, telephones. No, cars. No …

Washington Post: Facebook is like chairs. No, telephones. No, cars. No …. “Whether it’s chairs or newspapers or telephones or churches or the printing press, Facebook has a pattern of reaching for analogies to older, more widely accepted tools to downplay criticism and justify its march to global ubiquity. It’s a tactic that reveals how Facebook’s leaders rationalize the social network’s problems as they navigate seemingly endless waves of backlash. But historians of technology say that these sorts of comparisons can also be revealing in ways that the people drawing them don’t necessarily intend.”

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life. “Cornelia Dayton, a professor of history at UConn, has helped uncover some missing pieces in the life story of Phillis Wheatley, author of the first volume of poetry published by an African American. In a prize-winning research paper recently published in the New England Quarterly, Dayton describes her findings on the later parts of Wheatley’s life.” A Web site showcasing the research is underway.

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers

UConn Today: New Website Developed By Neag School Will Assist High School History Teachers. “Connecticut is the first state in the nation to mandate that all of its high schools offer an elective class on Black and Latinx history. These classes must be taught by the fall of 2022, but many high schools have added them to the curriculum this year. Alan Marcus, a professor of curriculum and instruction in UConn’s Neag School of Education, has led a team that developed a website to assist high school teachers with the instruction of this course.” I took a quick look and didn’t see anything that was state-specific.

Washington Post: They were the world’s only all-female army. Their descendants are fighting to recapture their humanity.

Washington Post: They were the world’s only all-female army. Their descendants are fighting to recapture their humanity. . “History is often told through the lens of conquerors. Generations of American schoolchildren learned more about the 15th century ‘discoveries’ of Christopher Columbus than his record of enslaving Indigenous people. Britain framed its 1897 takeover of a storied West African kingdom as a ‘punitive mission,’ glossing over the mass theft of priceless bronzes. After France seized what is now southern Benin in 1894, colonial officers disbanded the territory’s unique force of women warriors, opened new classrooms and made no mention in the curriculum of the Amazons. Even today, many in the country of 12 million know little about their foremother.”

The Plantation and the Pizza Hut: A Suburban County Reconsiders Its History (Route Fifty)

Route Fifty: The Plantation and the Pizza Hut: A Suburban County Reconsiders Its History. “The United States is in the midst of an awakening about its history, especially when it comes to issues of race. That’s playing out at the national level, in state capitals, at county and municipal government offices, and at sites like Oak Hill and another historic community nearby whose centerpiece was eventually replaced by a Pizza Hut. Fairfax County officials have pledged to add more Black voices to its story. That won’t be easy, and will require a new approach to how its history is researched and interpreted.”

Google Blog: Explore our planet’s most unique places and cultures

Google Blog: Explore our planet’s most unique places and cultures. “Our physical world is changing faster than ever. Climate change and global socio-economic shifts are threatening our magnificent natural landscapes and disrupting small communities. In keeping with this, there is value to be found in confronting and documenting our at-risk environment. For World Photography Day, we invite you to explore A World of Difference, a new online exhibition on Google Arts & Culture offering a perspective of these diverse stories through the lens of Italian photographer Angelo Chiacchio, in collaboration with Art Works for Change.”

Virginia Tech: Researchers are pulling movements out of microfilm with digital history

Virginia Tech: Researchers are pulling movements out of microfilm with digital history. “Firsthand accounts and images of Black soldiers hold hidden chapters of U.S. history. Historians and computer scientists are harnessing technologies like virtual reality and AI to equip the public to immerse themselves in those perspectives, learn from them, and broaden historical dialogue.”