GeekWire: Beating Wikipedia by 2 years, Seattle’s HistoryLink remains an innovative online encyclopedia

GeekWire: Beating Wikipedia by 2 years, Seattle’s HistoryLink remains an innovative online encyclopedia. “Wikipedia was a groundbreaking initiative when it went live on Jan. 15, 2001. But a Seattle-based project called HistoryLink actually launched its online encyclopedia — filled with historical facts and stories about Washington state — exactly two years before Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger hit the scene with Wikipedia.”

‘It can get a little crazy sometimes’: N.S. history buffs summing up 400 years, in tweets (CBC)

CBC: ‘It can get a little crazy sometimes’: N.S. history buffs summing up 400 years, in tweets. “One of the things [Leo] Deveau likes about the Twitter feed is the reach it has and its ability to connect with people from all over the world. Deveau isn’t alone on Twitter for using the platform to educate people about Nova Scotia’s history. Other accounts include the Beaton Institute, which is the archives at Cape Breton University. Its Twitter account offers information about Cape Breton’s ‘economic, political, and culture history.'”

Imperial & Global Forum: Amazing new digital archive of political maps for imperial and global historians

Imperial & Global Forum: Amazing new digital archive of political maps for imperial and global historians. “In case you missed it (I was tweeting about it A LOT last week), Cornell Library’s Digital Collections have just made available an amazing archive – the PJ Mode Collection – consisting of around 800 political maps that should be on the radar of anyone working on imperial and global history. They. Are. Awesome.”

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History

GQ: The Time Capsule That’s as Big as Human History. “If you were to build your own time capsule, what would you want people—or alien beings—a million years from now to know about us? That we were loving, or warmongering, or dopes strung out on memes and viral videos? That we flew to the moon and made great art, ate Cinnabons (that we measured at 880 astonishing calories), and committed atrocities? How could you begin to represent these times, as lived by nearly 8 billion people? And what would give you, of all people, the right to tell the story? After these questions would come another wave of more logistical ones. Assuming the capsule was found, how would it be translated into the language of the future, whatever that language might be? And what materials could be employed that might last that long? And how could you lead a future race of beings to the capsule itself, assuming our planet might be buried under ice or oceans of red sand by then?”

A Long Journey to the Washington Mall: A History of Black Museums (University of California Press)

University of California Press: A Long Journey to the Washington Mall: A History of Black Museums. “To commemorate the fortieth anniversary (1978–2018) of the African American Museum Association (AAMA), known today as the Association of African American Museums (AAAM), The Public Historian has published a special issue on ‘The State of Black Museums.’ We are pleased to make this issue free for you to read online for a limited time.” I came across this within the last couple of days but it was published in August. I checked two of the articles and it seems they are still available for free.

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Set of Educational Apps for Back to School

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Set of Educational Apps for Back to School. “The Library of Congress, in collaboration with educational organizations, today announced the launch of two new web- and mobile-based applications related to Congress and civics for use in K-12 classrooms. These new applications transport students through primary sources to some of the most dramatic turning points in U.S. history and immerse them in the related debates.”

The Keepers – A New NPR & Podcast Series (The Kitchen Sisters)

The Kitchen Sisters: The Keepers – A New NPR & Podcast Series. “This week, we launch a new series — The Keepers — stories of activist archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians. Keepers of the culture and the cultures and collections they keep. Guardians of history, large and small. Protectors of the free flow of information and ideas.”