William & Mary: ‘Hamilton’ heightens interest in King George III

William & Mary: ‘Hamilton’ heightens interest in King George III. “This month marks five years since England’s Royal Archives opened its collections from the Georgian monarchy to the public. By providing online access to these materials, scholars and historians around the globe are making new discoveries about the Georgian kings, and specifically about King George III…. Faced with nearly a half million pages of text to be transcribed, W&M Libraries is turning to the community for help.”

Museums+Heritage: V&A launches ‘world’s largest and most accessible’ cultural heritage preservation database

Museums+Heritage: V&A launches ‘world’s largest and most accessible’ cultural heritage preservation database. “Launched as part of the V&A’s ongoing Culture in Crisis programme, the Museum’s new free-to-access Culture in Crisis Portal is claimed to be the world’s largest and most accessible database of cultural heritage preservation projects.” The V&A in this case is the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Opinion: Gratitude for our libraries, museums and historians (Juneau Empire)

Juneau Empire: Opinion: Gratitude for our libraries, museums and historians. “Thanksgiving has undergone several transitions — from its original expression of gratitude to over-commercialization to, more recently, its repudiation by those believing it represents an insensitive stereotype of Native Americans. Yet, nothing about human history is ever as simple as it appears. Recognition of what we did wrong, as well as what we did right, is part of understanding the nuance and complexity of history.” All you archivists, librarians, teachers, and other keepers of history, reach around and pat yourself on the back. You have a difficult and vital job.

The indispensable Ken Burns has a new initiative: A one-stop online resource for teachers (Washington Post)

Kinda surprised I missed this last week, but there you are. From the Washington Post: The indispensable Ken Burns has a new initiative: A one-stop online resource for teachers. “Burns — the maker of ‘The Civil War,’ ‘Baseball,’ ‘Jazz,’ ‘The War,’ ‘The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,’ ‘Prohibition,’ ‘The Roosevelts’ and ‘The Vietnam War’ — launched a new research site for educators on Tuesday called ‘Ken Burns in the Classroom’ on PBS LearningMedia — an online destination for free teaching and learning resources inspired by his documentaries.”

SF Gate: A San Francisco archive has added hundreds of amazing photos. See the best ones here.

SF Gate: A San Francisco archive has added hundreds of amazing photos. See the best ones here.. “For San Francisco history lovers, there are few places more amazing on the internet than OpenSFHistory. The image archive, kick-started by an anonymous private collector, houses over 45,000 historic images of the city, from pre-Gold Rush to the 1990s. It’s a trove of street views, everyday life and famous local events. As photos are donated, scanned and uploaded, OpenSFHistory occasionally adds a big set of new images. They’ve done that recently, and we went through and found some of the most interesting gems in the gallery above.”

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales. “Windsor women who were in their teens and early 20s in the 1920s and 1930s — also known as Modern Girls — have had their lives and experiences archived on a new website [Matthew] McLaughlin and two other University of Windsor history students are launching at a public event Thursday. Comprised of 1,400 photographs, advertisements, newspaper articles, memorabilia and oral histories, the digital archive showcases local women’s history like nothing before it.”

United Nations: UN spotlights digitization of audiovisual archives to preserve human history on World Day

United Nations News: UN spotlights digitization of audiovisual archives to preserve human history on World Day. “UNESCO in 2015 launched a fundraising project to create digital surrogates of the Organisation’s archives dating back to its predecessors, including the League of Nations’ International Institute for Intellectual Cooperation…. A wealth of 5,000 photos, 8,000 hours of sound recordings, 45 hours of film, and 560,000 pages of governing body documents capture oceanography, space exploration, human rights communications, and traces of intellectual figures such as Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Masaharu Anesaki and more.”