Heritage Daily: The Digital Corpus Of Literary Papyri (DCLP), A New Digital Tool For Researching Ancient Literature, Is Now Available.

Heritage Daily: The Digital Corpus Of Literary Papyri (DCLP), A New Digital Tool For Researching Ancient Literature, Is Now Available.. “Scholars from Heidelberg University and New York University (USA) spearheaded the development of the newly released open-access database, which offers information about and transcripts of Greek and Latin texts preserved on fragments of papyri, but also, for example, on ceramic shards or wooden tablets…. The database is accessible to anyone and currently has information on nearly 15,000 fragments of ancient works. Approximately 1,000 of these entries include the corresponding Greek or Latin texts.”

University of St. Thomas: St. Thomas History Students Contribute to Anti-slavery Digital Archives

University of St. Thomas: St. Thomas History Students Contribute to Anti-slavery Digital Archives. “A call for help from the Boston Public Library to historians around the country inspired a ‘Transcribe-a-thon’ hosted by the St. Thomas History Department on March 13. Thousands of scanned, original documents from early abolitionists need to be transcribed to make them digitally discoverable for research.”

Washington Post: How social media spread a historical lie

Washington Post: How social media spread a historical lie . “Earlier this month, a hashtag made its way across Twitter: “#triggeraliberalin4words.” Kambree Kawahine Koa, whose bio identifies her as a “political news contributor,” scored big with her offering, which garnered almost 10,000 likes and close to 1,000 replies. “The Democrats created KKK,” she tweeted over a photo of a Klan march captioned: “This photo was taken at the 1924 Democratic Convention. It was known as the ‘Klanbake’ (just in case you want to Google it).” The only problem? There was no Klan march at the 1924 Democratic convention — the photo was actually taken in Wisconsin — nor was the convention ever actually known as the ‘Klanbake.'”

Columbus Underground: Owners Tracking the History of their Homes with Housestry

Columbus Underground: Owners Tracking the History of their Homes with Housestry. “Odds are your house had a life before you. Or maybe you wonder who now inhabits your childhood home? Instead of an awkward knock on the front door, Housestry is building a digital yearbook of sorts for properties across Columbus and the world. While there are a number of sites out there to keep tabs on an address, Housestry Founder Wayne Henry says the social component has been missing – the ability for a homeowner to share their personal stories, post pictures and connect with previous owners.”

AASLH: Most Trust Museums as Sources of Historical Information

AASLH: Most Trust Museums as Sources of Historical Information. “In an AASLH 2018 broader population sampling, conducted by Wilkening Consulting, we asked 1,000 people about the trustworthiness of four history sources, and a generic ‘museums.’ We found that 81% of respondents ranked history museums and historic sites as ‘absolutely’ or ‘somewhat’ trustworthy—making them more trustworthy than history textbooks and nonfiction, high school history teachers, and the internet as sources of history information.” AASLH stands for American Association for State and Local History.

Atlas Obscura: Where Old, Unreadable Documents Go to Be Understood

Atlas Obscura: Where Old, Unreadable Documents Go to Be Understood. “ON ANY GIVEN DAY, FROM her home on the Isle of Man, Linda Watson might be reading a handwritten letter from one Confederate soldier to another, or a list of convicts transported to Australia. Or perhaps she is reading a will, a brief from a long-forgotten legal case, an original Jane Austen manuscript. Whatever is in them, these documents made their way to her because they have one thing in common: They’re close to impossible to read.”

Columbia Journalism Review: How Tom Tryniski digitized nearly 50 million pages of newspapers in his living room

Columbia Journalism Review: How Tom Tryniski digitized nearly 50 million pages of newspapers in his living room. “TOM TRYNISKI DOES NOT LOCK HIS DOORS. He spends most days sitting in his living room in Fulton, New York, 30 miles northwest of Syracuse, in front of two jumbo computer monitors, looking something like a security guard, but friendlier. He appears young for 68—skinny, with a head of white hair and an energetic demeanor. He wears a uniform of jeans and a slim-fitting T-shirt, but no coat in the chilly fall air. When we talk, he is almost always smirking.”