A Long Journey to the Washington Mall: A History of Black Museums (University of California Press)

University of California Press: A Long Journey to the Washington Mall: A History of Black Museums. “To commemorate the fortieth anniversary (1978–2018) of the African American Museum Association (AAMA), known today as the Association of African American Museums (AAAM), The Public Historian has published a special issue on ‘The State of Black Museums.’ We are pleased to make this issue free for you to read online for a limited time.” I came across this within the last couple of days but it was published in August. I checked two of the articles and it seems they are still available for free.

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Set of Educational Apps for Back to School

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Set of Educational Apps for Back to School. “The Library of Congress, in collaboration with educational organizations, today announced the launch of two new web- and mobile-based applications related to Congress and civics for use in K-12 classrooms. These new applications transport students through primary sources to some of the most dramatic turning points in U.S. history and immerse them in the related debates.”

The Keepers – A New NPR & Podcast Series (The Kitchen Sisters)

The Kitchen Sisters: The Keepers – A New NPR & Podcast Series. “This week, we launch a new series — The Keepers — stories of activist archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians. Keepers of the culture and the cultures and collections they keep. Guardians of history, large and small. Protectors of the free flow of information and ideas.”

The Guardian: Huge historical archive of mail from captured ships to go online

The Guardian: Huge historical archive of mail from captured ships to go online . “An archive of thousands of undelivered personal letters from all over the world, seized from ships captured during Britain’s naval wars over three centuries, are to be digitised in a project offering an intimate glimpse into people’s lives. The letters, found in mailbags, with many bearing wax seals and some still unopened, have so far yielded personal accounts, some heart-rending, and journals, sheet music, drawings, poems and a packet of 200-year-old seeds from South Africa.”

Texas forever: UNT history prof sets world record (unofficially) for longest history lesson (Denton Record-Chronicle)

Denton Record-Chronicle: Texas forever: UNT history prof sets world record (unofficially) for longest history lesson. “Andrew Torget hit his first major obstacle in the ninth hour of his lecture on Texas history. His throat was starting to swell up and it was getting hard for him to speak. He still had at least 15 hours to go. My first obstacle came much earlier and to a much lesser degree. I had run out of coffee and still had at least 22 hours to go.”

A Call to Action for Scholars of American History: Contribute to Wikipedia (National Archives)

National Archives: A Call to Action for Scholars of American History: Contribute to Wikipedia. “As the National Archives, along with many other organizations, prepares for the 19th Amendment’s centennial we are working hard to increase access to the records we hold around women’s suffrage. One way we are doing this is by collaborating with Wiki Education, a nonprofit focused on empowering people to expand and improve Wikipedia content for the benefit of all. Through this collaboration, Wiki Education is launching a new virtual, immersive training course designed to give participants the skills and practical experience necessary to improve Wikipedia coverage of the history of women’s voting rights in the United States.

BGR: History buffs will love this site that maps the oldest building in every U.S. state

BGR: History buffs will love this site that maps the oldest building in every U.S. state. “We report so much on the bleeding edge of all things tech, but there’s another story on the far opposite side of that world that’s just as fascinating and as relevant to everything we see around us today. We’re talking about history — more specifically, the history of the built environment, which is the focus of one site that’s gone ahead and mapped the oldest still-intact structure in all 50 states.”