University of Stirling: Replicas are also ‘the real thing’ say researchers

University of Stirling: Replicas are also ‘the real thing’ say researchers. “Heritage specialists at the University of Stirling are calling on those who create, use and care for replicas to rethink their approaches after launching a new website to promote recognition of their authenticity, value and significance. New Future for Replicas, co-produced by an international team of experts led by Stirling’s Dr Sally Foster and Professor Siân Jones, offers innovative guidance encouraging professionals, institutions, museums and heritage sites to place new value on physical replicas, whether copies of monuments or artefacts.”

NBC 2: Museums and historians are navigating how to write the history of Covid-19 when the end isn’t in sight

NBC 2: Museums and historians are navigating how to write the history of Covid-19 when the end isn’t in sight. “When the Covid-19 pandemic broke out in the United States, the California Historical Society received call after call asking for its archive on the 1918 flu. Researchers and journalists were looking for clues into how Americans coped in the thick of a pandemic — and what we could learn in 2020 from 1918. But the documents from the early 20th century were few and there was just one photograph in the archive to depict the entire experience. Historians, libraries and museums now are making sure, in that way, history does not repeat itself with the coronavirus pandemic.”

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Web project gives voice to non-Europeans who aided British exploration

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Web project gives voice to non-Europeans who aided British exploration. “A new digital humanities project from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln focuses on the non-European individuals who assisted the quests of famed Victorian explorers such as David Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley.”

The Anti-Mask League of 1919: The Cultural Battle of an Enduring Pandemic (Untapped New York)

Untapped New York: The Anti-Mask League of 1919: The Cultural Battle of an Enduring Pandemic. “Before discussing the actions of the anti-mask league, it is critical to remember just how widespread and deadly the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 was. The flu infected 500 million people around the world, 27% of the world’s population, and killed anywhere from 17 million to 50 million people. In New York City, 33,000 residents died — with 65% of the deaths occurring in the second wave. In the first year of the pandemic, the average life expectancy in the United States dropped by a staggering 12 years.”

MarketWatch: ‘If I tell people about what happened, I honor my ancestors.’ How the pandemic is helping a slavery historian develop a K-12 lesson plan on African-American history

MarketWatch: ‘If I tell people about what happened, I honor my ancestors.’ How the pandemic is helping a slavery historian develop a K-12 lesson plan on African-American history. “When COVID-19 stormed America in March, Christine King Mitchell took a break from her job as a docent at the Old Slave Mart Museum in Charleston, S.C. Mitchell, 64, is an historian who has made education and research on the enslavement of African-Americans from 1619 to 1865 her life’s work. But how to keep going during a global pandemic, in a moment when the May 25 police killing of George Floyd and subsequent anti-racism protests have triggered a broad cultural push to acknowledge the longstanding oppression of Black Americans more fully?”

The Next Web: New AI project captures Jane Austen’s thoughts on social media

The Next Web: New AI project captures Jane Austen’s thoughts on social media. “The project — called AI|Writer — uses OpenAI’s new text generator API to create simulated conversations with virtual historical figures. The system first works out the purpose of the message and the intended recipient by searching for patterns in the text. It then uses the API‘s internal knowledge of that person to guess how they would respond in their written voice.”

WashU Expert: How to document the protests (Washington University in St. Louis)

Washington University in St. Louis: WashU Expert: How to document the protests. “Americans across the nation are documenting today’s protests through photography and video, often posting their content on Instagram, Twitter and other social media feeds. But is that the safest way to preserve these historic images? No, said Miranda Rectenwald, curator of local history at University Libraries at Washington University in St. Louis. She has created a list of resources from Documenting the Now, the Blacktivists and more, to help protest participants preserve their content for the long term.”

The Harvard Crimson: Graduate School of Education Begins Black Teacher Archives Project

The Harvard Crimson: Graduate School of Education Begins Black Teacher Archives Project. “The Black Teacher Archives, a research project archiving content about the history of African American education, was recently launched at the Graduate School of Education. Funded by a $610,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, the Black Teacher Archives seeks to ‘lay the groundwork for a dynamic digital archive to rejuvenate academic scholarship in the field of African American educational history,’ according to its grant proposal.”

Hürriyet Daily News: Turkish cultural group brings virus emotions to life

Hürriyet Daily News: Turkish cultural group brings virus emotions to life. “A Turkish cultural institute launched a digital art project that brings together expressions of emotions from around the world during the coronavirus pandemic. The Turkish nonprofit Yunus Emre Institute began the project when the pandemic struck the globe with a sea of unexpected experiences.”

Smithsonian: National Museum of African American History and Culture Releases “Talking About Race” Web Portal

Smithsonian: National Museum of African American History and Culture Releases “Talking About Race” Web Portal. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture today launched Talking About Race, a new online portal designed to help individuals, families, and communities talk about racism, racial identity and the way these forces shape every aspect of society, from the economy and politics to the broader American culture.”

New York Times: Coronavirus Depletes the Keepers of Europe’s Memory

New York Times: Coronavirus Depletes the Keepers of Europe’s Memory. “For years, Gildo Negri visited schools to share his stories about blowing up bridges and cutting electrical wires to sabotage Nazis and fascists during World War II. In January, the 89-year-old made another visit, leaving his nursing home outside Milan to help students plant trees in honor of Italians deported to concentration camps. But at the end of February, as Europe’s first outbreak of the coronavirus spread through Mr. Negri’s nursing home, it infected him, too.”

University of Connecticut: UConn to Offer Collaborative Minor in Digital Public History

University of Connecticut: UConn to Offer Collaborative Minor in Digital Public History. “Two faculty have been awarded a $35,000 planning grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Humanities Connections program to develop a new undergraduate minor in digital public history. The new minor expands on the established field of public history by providing students with the humanities knowledge and a set of digital media tools necessary to succeed as scholars in a digital world. Students interested in the minor can begin taking the pre-requisite courses in Fall 2020.” I didn’t have a good idea of what public history is, but the University of Louisiana at Lafayette has a great overview.

SUNY Polytechnic: SUNY Poly Offering Online ‘Pandemic Studies Semester’ to Students in New York and Around the World

SUNY Polytechnic: SUNY Poly Offering Online ‘Pandemic Studies Semester’ to Students in New York and Around the World. “Students who enroll in the online program can sign up for custom ‘bundles’ consisting of two courses—one from a distinctive disciplinary perspective, such as history, anthropology, or nanotechnology; and the other to produce distinct ‘artifacts’ of their choice, such as essays, presentations, digital art, 3D models, or the production of equipment that can help essential workers on the front lines. Most courses provide general education credits.”

Wired: An Oral History of the Day Everything Changed

Wired: An Oral History of the Day Everything Changed. “Every hour seemed to bring major new developments: On Wall Street, after days of huge up-and-down gyrations, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1,465 points and officially entered bear territory; Capitol Hill faced its first confirmed Covid-19 case; the NCAA announced it would play its basketball tournament without fans; and then, in rapid-fire succession that evening, President Trump gave an Oval Office address, announcing a travel ban from Europe, the NBA suspended its season after player Rudy Gobert tested positive for the virus, and Tom Hanks and his wife, Rita, posted on Instagram that they too had been diagnosed while in Australia and were recuperating. By Thursday, the national landscape had been undeniably altered, and Americans were panic-buying toilet paper.”

FOX Illinois: Illinois State Museum collecting COVID-19 stories

FOX Illinois: Illinois State Museum collecting COVID-19 stories. “The Museum wants Illinois residents to share stories that reflect their experience during the COVID-19 pandemic, for the benefit of future generations. The stories will be collected through the Illinois State Museum’s Share your Story: Illinois in the COVID-19 Pandemic collecting initiative.”