BGR: History buffs will love this site that maps the oldest building in every U.S. state

BGR: History buffs will love this site that maps the oldest building in every U.S. state. “We report so much on the bleeding edge of all things tech, but there’s another story on the far opposite side of that world that’s just as fascinating and as relevant to everything we see around us today. We’re talking about history — more specifically, the history of the built environment, which is the focus of one site that’s gone ahead and mapped the oldest still-intact structure in all 50 states.”

Dallas Observer: UNT Professor Will Attempt World’s Longest History Lesson

Dallas Observer: UNT Professor Will Attempt World’s Longest History Lesson. “In a moment of serendipity, Andrew Torget and his two young children found themselves scrolling though the fabled Guinness World Records. They began looking for low-hanging fruit in hopes of adding their names to the record book, a dream deferred from Torget’s childhood. While his children had as little luck as their father did at their age, Torget is planning on making yet another attempt at global glory. This time, his intentions go far beyond either fame or novelty.”

Niche Canada: The Syllabus Project

Niche Canada: The Syllabus Project. “Has anyone else noticed how often environmental history syllabi largely omit women and scholars of colour? A colleague’s initial Twitter query about good sources for an environmental syllabus was followed by dozens of excellent suggestions—but none of those suggested sources were written by women and few were by scholars of colour. Dolly Jørgensen commented on this lack of diversity, and a lively Twitter discussion ensued about the structural reasons for underrepresentation. A discussion on the Women’s Environmental History Network (WEHN) email list occurred simultaneously, while the #WomenAlsoKnowHistory hashtag and website https://womenalsoknowhistory.com/ were in development.”

VPR: As News Outlets Drop Photographers, Who Will Document Vermont’s Visual Story?

VPR: As News Outlets Drop Photographers, Who Will Document Vermont’s Visual Story?. “Layoffs are not uncommon in the newspaper industry these days, but the recent layoff of a local veteran newspaper photographer seems to indicate another shift in 21st-century journalism — and one that is being felt in Vermont. It was announced last week that Glenn Russell, a veteran staff photographer for the Burlington Free Press, was being laid off. Russell’s work had been appearing in the paper since 1986. As Seven Days noted in their coverage of Russell’s layoff, there were at least five photographers on staff at the Free Press in the 1980s, whereas now just one remains at the paper.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: Female Historians Try to End the I-Didn’t-Know-Any-Women Excuse for Men-Only Panels

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Female Historians Try to End the I-Didn’t-Know-Any-Women Excuse for Men-Only Panels. “Following in the footsteps of other disciplines, a group of female historians unveiled a searchable online database on Tuesday listing their peers’ areas of expertise and contact information. The site — called Women Also Know History — is meant to make it abundantly easy to find female historians to invite to speak at conferences, quote in articles, or add to a syllabus.”

Heritage Daily: The Digital Corpus Of Literary Papyri (DCLP), A New Digital Tool For Researching Ancient Literature, Is Now Available.

Heritage Daily: The Digital Corpus Of Literary Papyri (DCLP), A New Digital Tool For Researching Ancient Literature, Is Now Available.. “Scholars from Heidelberg University and New York University (USA) spearheaded the development of the newly released open-access database, which offers information about and transcripts of Greek and Latin texts preserved on fragments of papyri, but also, for example, on ceramic shards or wooden tablets…. The database is accessible to anyone and currently has information on nearly 15,000 fragments of ancient works. Approximately 1,000 of these entries include the corresponding Greek or Latin texts.”

University of St. Thomas: St. Thomas History Students Contribute to Anti-slavery Digital Archives

University of St. Thomas: St. Thomas History Students Contribute to Anti-slavery Digital Archives. “A call for help from the Boston Public Library to historians around the country inspired a ‘Transcribe-a-thon’ hosted by the St. Thomas History Department on March 13. Thousands of scanned, original documents from early abolitionists need to be transcribed to make them digitally discoverable for research.”