An Oxford Historian: The Corpus of Early Medieval Coin Finds

New-to-me, from An Oxford Historian: The Corpus of Early Medieval Coin Finds. “Run by Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum, this site provides a database for single coin finds from the years c. 410 to 1180. Far more specifically focused than the PAS, this is the perfect resource for anyone interested in numismatics more specifically. Included in each entry is a photograph of both sides of the coin, along with a lot of background information, and a useful catalogue number for further research.”

ESPN Press Room: The Undefeated and Getty Images Join Forces to Spotlight the Black Experience through Visual Storytelling

ESPN Press Room: The Undefeated and Getty Images Join Forces to Spotlight the Black Experience through Visual Storytelling. “The Undefeated, ESPN’s multimedia initiative exploring the intersection of sports, race and culture, and Getty Images, a world leader in visual communications, today announced a creative agreement that will see the two companies collaborate on visual stories that spotlight the Black experience.”

Mashable: The 25 best educational podcasts for learning what you missed in school

Mashable: The 25 best educational podcasts for learning what you missed in school . “Podcasts radically shift the dynamics around who gets to teach, and who gets to learn. A lot of the most beloved and popular shows, like Radiolab and Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History, basically boil down to what you wish your science or history class had been like in the first place. Many others, like 1619 and You’re Wrong About, aim to correct the misinformation in many accepted cultural narratives from both our near and distant pasts. Now, obviously, podcasts can’t replace a world-class, bonafide, IRL, teacher-to-student relationship. But they can teach us more than a few vital lessons. Here are a few of our most educational favorites.”

China .org: Digitization helps to build online library of historical tomes

China .org: Digitization helps to build online library of historical tomes. “For the 26th World Book and Copyright Day last week, 10 Chinese libraries jointly released the digitized editions of over 1,700 volumes of ancient Chinese books. This is the fourth expansion of the national database of ancient Chinese books since it went online in 2016. The database was launched by the National Center for Preservation and Conservation of Ancient Books, headquartered at the National Library of China in Beijing.”

Culpeper Star-Exponent: UVa looks to provide digitized context to historic features on Grounds

Culpeper Star-Exponent: UVa looks to provide digitized context to historic features on Grounds. “People soon may hear all about Homer’s statue on The Lawn at the University of Virginia with a simple scan of a QR code on their smartphone. In fact, they may hear conflicting interpretations of the statue, The Lawn and UVa as the university seeks to provide context to its memorials, statues, plaques and buildings.”

Google Blog: Culture needs us, as much as we need culture

Google Blog: Culture needs us, as much as we need culture. “On the occasion of World Heritage Day, UNESCO, Google Arts & Culture and our international partners are joining forces to promote access to and education around cultural and natural heritage through a new online resource, Explore UNESCO World Heritage. This is a unique opportunity to enjoy a virtual globetrotting tour of cultural landmarks and outstanding places of natural beauty, as well as to access accurate and reliable information on sites of outstanding universal value.”

Lapham’s Quarterly: Revisiting the Dead

Lapham’s Quarterly: Revisiting the Dead. “Earlier in the year, I heard a news report that mentioned there were few, if any, memorials to those who died in the influenza pandemic of 1918. It just wasn’t the sort of mass death that lent itself easily to memorialization. I wondered if or how we would memorialize our own pandemic. Soon thereafter, I stumbled across a blog post about the burial grounds—and memorials—dedicated to those who died in nineteenth-century pandemics on Staten Island. I wanted to go see all three sites—the one in St. George, one up the road from there, and one farther south along the coast called Seguine Point—thinking maybe I would glimpse into our future.”

My Modern Met: Artist Uses AI To Recreate How Famous Historical Figures Would Look Like in Real Life

My Modern Met: Artist Uses AI To Recreate How Famous Historical Figures Would Look Like in Real Life. “Have you ever wondered what famous figures from the distant past really looked like? San Francisco-based artist Nathan Shipley answers the question with his series of AI-generated portraits. He uses historical paintings and illustrations as the framework for AI technology to create realistic renditions of notable leaders, musicians, and writers who all existed before the advent of photography.”

Collecting These Times: American Jewish Experiences of the Pandemic (Spotted via Google Alerts)

Spotted via my Google Alerts: Collecting These Times: American Jewish Experiences of the Pandemic. From the front page: “COVID-19 has altered the way people engaged with their communities and religious practices. Collecting These Times connects American Jews to Jewish institutions and other collecting projects which can gather and preserve their experiences of the pandemic. Individuals can find relevant collecting projects through the portal and easily contribute materials such as images, videos, audio recordings, documents, and oral histories to collecting institutions in different parts of the U.S.”

Ars Technica: Egyptologists translate the oldest-known mummification manual

Ars Technica: Egyptologists translate the oldest-known mummification manual. “Egyptologists have recently translated the oldest-known mummification manual. Translating it required solving a literal puzzle; the medical text that includes the manual is currently in pieces, with half of what remains in the Louvre Museum in France and half at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. A few sections are completely missing, but what’s left is a treatise on medicinal herbs and skin diseases, especially the ones that cause swelling. Surprisingly, one section of that text includes a short manual on embalming.”

Mashable: Dive into women’s history with these 4 free online resources

Mashable: Dive into women’s history with these 4 free online resources. “Mashable reached out to the National Women’s History Museum, the National Women’s History Alliance, the New-York Historical Society’s Center for Women’s History, and the National Women’s Hall of Fame to curate a list of engaging resources that elevate the largely untold stories of underrepresented women. They also explore the fight for suffrage and other vital movements within women’s history. We included digital media that feature a wide range of women from varying cultures, sexualities, classes, and fields.”

CNN: Rare ‘locked’ letter sealed 300 years ago is finally opened virtually

CNN: Rare ‘locked’ letter sealed 300 years ago is finally opened virtually. “Three hundred years ago, before envelopes, passwords and security codes, writers often struggled to keep thoughts, cares and dreams expressed in their letters private. One popular way was to use a technique called letter locking — intricately folding a flat sheet of paper to become its own envelope. This security strategy presented a challenge when 577 locked letters delivered to The Hague in the Netherlands between 1689 and 1706 were found in a trunk of undelivered mail.”

Women’s History Month 2021: Movies and TV shows to uplift and inspire (CNET)

CNET: Women’s History Month 2021: Movies and TV shows to uplift and inspire. “Women’s History Month, which runs through the end of March, is a time to honor the vital role of women in history and celebrate their diverse achievements and stories. To mark the occasion, the CNET team has come up with a list of inspiring and illuminating movies and TV shows that explore the triumphs and challenges of the female experience. Some are documentaries, of activists, artists, politicians and more. Others are historical dramas that open a window on women’s lives in the past, or contemporary takes that feature compelling female characters navigating modern life.”