Poynter: Hoaxes about coronavirus tests have political uses and can push patients away

Poynter: Hoaxes about coronavirus tests have political uses and can push patients away. “Who has the right to be tested for the 2019 coronavirus? Only those with symptoms, or also those who are in quarantine but feeling fine? How much does the test cost? Will uninsured people have to pay out of pocket? Or is the government covering testing costs? Over the past week, the volume of false answers to those questions on social media caught the attention of fact-checkers that are part of the #CoronaVirusFacts/#DatosCoronaVirus alliance.”

CNET: Twitter users duped by fake account that falsely claimed Daniel Radcliffe has coronavirus

CNET: Twitter users duped by fake account that falsely claimed Daniel Radcliffe has coronavirus. “A fake BBC News Twitter account falsely claimed Tuesday that actor Daniel Radcliffe, known for his role as Harry Potter in the film series, had tested positive for the novel coronavirus. Twitter suspended the account but the tweet was up for at least seven hours, raising questions about whether the social network is acting swiftly enough to combat misinformation.” This one was interesting to me because it fooled people who usually don’t get fooled by these things.

‘Death by Twitter’: Understanding false death announcements on social media and the performance of platform cultural capital (First Monday)

First Monday: ‘Death by Twitter’: Understanding false death announcements on social media and the performance of platform cultural capital . “In this paper, we analyse false death announcements of public figures on social media and public responses to them. The analysis draws from a range of public sources to collect and categorise the volume of false death announcements on Twitter and undertakes a case study analysis of representative examples.”

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief. “Researchers at The Ohio State University found that flagging inaccurate political posts because they had been disputed by fact-checkers or fellow Facebook users was not as good at reducing belief in the falsehoods or stopping people from sharing them.However, labeling inaccurate posts as being humor, parody or a hoax did reduce Facebook users’ belief in the falsehoods and resulted in significantly less willingness to share the posts.”

Poynter: A fact-checker predicted which hoax would resurface — and beat it by an hour

Poynter: A fact-checker predicted which hoax would resurface — and beat it by an hour. “Maarten Schenk has studied fake news and hoaxes so exactingly that he managed to predict a group of trolls’ next post. The co-founder of the fact-checking site Lead Stories in Belgium keeps several Twitter columns open whenever tragedy strikes so he can study which claims are getting more attention than just a handful of likes or retweets.”

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything . “f you’ve logged into Instagram since last week, you may have seen people posting a long, typo-laden screed about a new rule going into effect that gives the company the ability to sell, use, or share your photos unless you repost a specific message denying it. I have even seen a few famous photographers doing it. The statement sounds official, but it’s actually just the latest iteration of an internet chain letter that won’t do anything to protect your privacy or intellectual property from the social media networks or the wilds of the internet in general.”

BuzzFeed: This “Teen Girl” Went Viral For Tweeting From Her Fridge, But It’s Almost Definitely A Fake

BuzzFeed: This “Teen Girl” Went Viral For Tweeting From Her Fridge, But It’s Almost Definitely A Fake. “A person claiming to be a teenage girl named ‘Dorothy’ went viral on Twitter this week after allegedly tweeting from her smart fridge — but it appears to be nothing more than a hoax.”