‘Death by Twitter’: Understanding false death announcements on social media and the performance of platform cultural capital (First Monday)

First Monday: ‘Death by Twitter’: Understanding false death announcements on social media and the performance of platform cultural capital . “In this paper, we analyse false death announcements of public figures on social media and public responses to them. The analysis draws from a range of public sources to collect and categorise the volume of false death announcements on Twitter and undertakes a case study analysis of representative examples.”

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief. “Researchers at The Ohio State University found that flagging inaccurate political posts because they had been disputed by fact-checkers or fellow Facebook users was not as good at reducing belief in the falsehoods or stopping people from sharing them.However, labeling inaccurate posts as being humor, parody or a hoax did reduce Facebook users’ belief in the falsehoods and resulted in significantly less willingness to share the posts.”

Poynter: A fact-checker predicted which hoax would resurface — and beat it by an hour

Poynter: A fact-checker predicted which hoax would resurface — and beat it by an hour. “Maarten Schenk has studied fake news and hoaxes so exactingly that he managed to predict a group of trolls’ next post. The co-founder of the fact-checking site Lead Stories in Belgium keeps several Twitter columns open whenever tragedy strikes so he can study which claims are getting more attention than just a handful of likes or retweets.”

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything

Popular Science: Posting a copyright notice on social media doesn’t actually accomplish anything . “f you’ve logged into Instagram since last week, you may have seen people posting a long, typo-laden screed about a new rule going into effect that gives the company the ability to sell, use, or share your photos unless you repost a specific message denying it. I have even seen a few famous photographers doing it. The statement sounds official, but it’s actually just the latest iteration of an internet chain letter that won’t do anything to protect your privacy or intellectual property from the social media networks or the wilds of the internet in general.”

BuzzFeed: This “Teen Girl” Went Viral For Tweeting From Her Fridge, But It’s Almost Definitely A Fake

BuzzFeed: This “Teen Girl” Went Viral For Tweeting From Her Fridge, But It’s Almost Definitely A Fake. “A person claiming to be a teenage girl named ‘Dorothy’ went viral on Twitter this week after allegedly tweeting from her smart fridge — but it appears to be nothing more than a hoax.”

Poynter: Would you please help fact-checkers fight those never-ending moon hoaxes?

Poynter: Would you please help fact-checkers fight those never-ending moon hoaxes?. “Around the world, fact-checkers are popularly known for their work fighting political misinformation. But for the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, many of them have prepared lists of moon-related debunks you just can’t miss. Now it’s your turn to check out the work of some of the International Fact-Checking Network’s verified signatories, and make sure that the information you’re consuming and spreading about the moon isn’t too out of this world.”

Ars Technica: Behind the 12-year-old Wii Sports hoax that briefly fooled the Internet

Ars Technica: Behind the 12-year-old Wii Sports hoax that briefly fooled the Internet. “Before his resignation in late 2017, Uber’s then-CEO Travis Kalanick faced more than his fair share of scandals. But by far the most (read: least) important of these was Kalanick’s oft-repeated claim that, at one point, he ‘held the world’s second-highest score for the Nintendo Wii Tennis video game,’ as a New York Times profile confidently stated without qualification.”