How to Take Incredible Fireworks Photos Using a Smartphone: 10 Tips (MakeUseOf)

MakeUseOf: How to Take Incredible Fireworks Photos Using a Smartphone: 10 Tips. “Smartphone photography is a convenient way to get great photos without being weighed down with a heavy and bulky DSLR. You might think you need a professional camera setup to get amazing fireworks shots, but the camera in the palm of your hand is good enough. By using these smartphone photography tips, you can enjoy any fireworks display and get great photos without dragging a large camera bag along with you. Let’s jump right in.”

Juneteenth: A reading list (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Virginia Commonwealth University: Juneteenth: A reading list. “Juneteenth commemorates the day in 1865 when Union troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, and informed enslaved people there that they were free, some two and a half years after President Abraham Lincoln put into effect the Emancipation Proclamation. Sometimes called Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, the holiday has a rich history of celebration, remembrance and education that is continuing today on a larger, national scale. VCU News asked faculty, as well as staff from VCU Libraries, to suggest books that help readers understand and celebrate Juneteenth and all that it represents.”

The Mainichi: Tokyoites asked to refrain from cherry blossom parties even after quasi-emergency lifted

The Mainichi: Tokyoites asked to refrain from cherry blossom parties even after quasi-emergency lifted. “The Tokyo Metropolitan Government will call for people in the capital to continue implementing basic coronavirus infection prevention measures thoroughly and refrain from gathering to see cherry blossoms as part of responses to be taken after the quasi-state of emergency ends across Japan on March 21.”

Pew: More members of Congress, especially Democrats, are talking about Black History Month on social media

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): More members of Congress, especially Democrats, are talking about Black History Month on social media. “A growing share of congressional lawmakers have taken to social media each February to commemorate Black History Month, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of their Facebook and Twitter activity. Nearly two-in-three members of Congress (64%) mentioned Black History Month on Facebook or Twitter in February 2021, up from just 29% in 2015.”

CNN: Shanghai metro sparks Covid panic with festive red QR codes

CNN: Shanghai metro sparks Covid panic with festive red QR codes. “Chinese social media users reported Sunday that the Shanghai metro’s QR code — which passengers scan when they enter and exit stations -— had changed color from its usual black to red, according to state-run news outlet The Paper. It sparked terror in many passengers, and for good reason. For the past two years, a red QR code in China has meant that you have — or are suspected to have — Covid-19.”

Associated Press: December retail sales slip after a record holiday season

Associated Press: December retail sales slip after a record holiday season. “Americans overlooked shortages, spiking prices and uncertainty over the omicron variant to break spending records during the critical holiday shopping season. But figures released Friday show that after spending robustly early in the holiday season, consumers sharply slowed their purchases from November to December.”

Al Jazeera: French burn fewer cars on New Year’s Eve due to pandemic

Al Jazeera: French burn fewer cars on New Year’s Eve due to pandemic. “Hundreds of empty, parked cars go up in flames in France each New Year’s Eve, set afire by young revellers, a much-lamented tradition that appeared in decline this year, which saw only 874 vehicles burned. The number of cars burned overnight has declined compared with New Year’s Eve in 2019 when 1,316 vehicles went up in flames, Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin tweeted on Saturday.”

Associated Press: New Year’s Rose Parade proceeds despite COVID-19 surge

Associated Press: New Year’s Rose Parade proceeds despite COVID-19 surge. ” A year after New Year’s Day passed without a Rose Parade due to the coronavirus pandemic, the floral spectacle celebrating the arrival of 2022 proceeded Saturday despite a new surge of infections due to the omicron variant. The 133rd edition of the Pasadena, California, tradition featured actor LeVar Burton as grand marshal, 20 marching bands, 18 equestrian units and dozens of floats reflecting the theme of ‘Dream. Believe. Achieve.’”

New Year’s Eve around the world: How countries celebrated with widespread COVID restrictions (Sky News)

Sky News: New Year’s Eve around the world: How countries celebrated with widespread COVID restrictions. “New Year’s Eve plans have largely been muted or cancelled for the second straight year due to a surge in coronavirus infections – this time driven by the highly contagious Omicron variant. However, many nations made the best of it and went ahead with extravagant fireworks displays and celebrations. Here’s a snapshot from around the world.”

CBS News: Many U.S. New Year’s Eve celebrations called off amid COVID surge

CBS News: Many U.S. New Year’s Eve celebrations called off amid COVID surge . “In the last week, hospitalizations increased 14%, with a seven-day average of 9,000 per day. Some of the most significant involve pediatric cases. Those hospitalizations are up nearly 50% in several states. The surge in coronavirus cases, fueled by the Omicron variant, has pushed city leaders nationwide to significantly scale back or cancel New Year’s Eve plans.”

Tubefilter: TikTok Throwing Live New Year’s Eve Concert With Charlie Puth, Kali Uchis, Rico Nasty

Tubefilter: TikTok Throwing Live New Year’s Eve Concert With Charlie Puth, Kali Uchis, Rico Nasty. “The star-studded special – which TikTok says exemplifies its status as a driver of music and culture – will air on the flagship @TikTok account from 9 pm ET to 10:15 pm ET on New Year’s Eve. The event will be broadcast live from an apartment-themed staging area, with each of the three floors designed to fit each artist’s set.”