The Jerusalem Post: Italian Jewish Institutions In Search Of Historical Amateur Movies

The Jerusalem Post: Italian Jewish Institutions In Search Of Historical Amateur Movies. “Between July 1 and October 2, anyone who possesses amateur movies documenting Italian Jewish life, from before and in the aftermath of the Holocaust, is invited to reach out so that the material can be digitized and catalogued. ‘It is very hard to find footage as valuable as those filmed by Di Segni, or by the Ovazza family, shot between 1930 and 1936,’ CDEC director Gadi Luzzatto Voghera told the Italian Jewish paper Pagine Ebraiche on Monday. ‘For this reason, we are interested also in films from the period after the war.'”

WTOP: Holocaust Museum digitizing letters from Anne Frank’s father

WTOP: Holocaust Museum digitizing letters from Anne Frank’s father. “Ryan Cooper was a 20-something Californian unsure of his place in the world when he struck up a pen pal correspondence in the 1970s with Otto Frank, the father of the young Holocaust victim Anne Frank. Through dozens of letters and several face-to-face meetings, the two forged a friendship that lasted until Frank died in 1980 at the age of 91.”

SILive: Advance/SILive. com launches website featuring Holocaust survivor stories

SILive: Advance/SILive. com launches website featuring Holocaust survivor stories. “Today, the Advance/SILive.com proudly introduces our readers to a new website that has been nearly two years in the making. That’s how long multimedia specialist Shira Stoll has been working on a project to document the stories of Staten Island’s remaining Holocaust survivors.”

Arolsen Archives: More than 13 million documents online

Arolsen Archives: More than 13 million documents online. “The database contains a comprehensive collection of documents from concentration camps, including prisoner cards and death notices. The more than 13 million documents featuring information on over 2.2 million people persecuted by the Nazi Regime are part of the UNESCO’s World Documentary Heritage and are a key focus of the collection of the Arolsen Archives. This database is the first of several large collections scheduled to go online in future.”

New York Times: A Holocaust Story for the Social Media Generation

New York Times: A Holocaust Story for the Social Media Generation. “The teenager’s Instagram posts start out breezily enough. Eva Heyman, who just got her first pair of heels for her 13th birthday, films herself eating ice cream in the park. There’s also a teenage crush. But everything rapidly turns dark. Eva’s Instagram account, based on a diary kept by the real Eva Heyman in 1944, will go live Wednesday afternoon for the start of Israel’s annual Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Day.”

Riverfront Times: She Interviewed 144 St. Louis Holocaust Survivors. Now Her Work Is Online

Riverfront Times: She Interviewed 144 St. Louis Holocaust Survivors. Now Her Work Is Online. “In 1979, Vida ‘Sister’ Prince saw an article in the paper showcasing the recently opened St. Louis Holocaust Center. After calling the director and offering to volunteer, Prince found that the center was looking for people to accompany Holocaust survivors as they shared their story in local schools. Although Prince was Jewish, she had no familial connection to the Holocaust. She had never even met a Holocaust survivor before. Still, she jumped at the opportunity to travel across St. Louis with these survivors. It was during these sessions that Prince decided she wanted to do more. She wanted to help these survivors preserve their stories. So, she broke out the cassette tapes and started recording. “

The Times: Holocaust victims’ remains found in Imperial War Museum archives

The Times: Holocaust victims’ remains found in Imperial War Museum archives. “More than 70 years after they were murdered at Auschwitz, six unknown Holocaust victims will be laid to rest after it was revealed that their remains have lain for decades in the Imperial War Museum archives. Unbeknown to Jewish leaders, the ashes and bone fragments, believed to belong to five adults and a child, have been in storage for more than 20 years since they were bequeathed in the late 1990s by a Holocaust survivor who took them during a visit to the Nazi death camp.” Sometimes I have to stop, take out my handkerchief, and cry for a few minutes.