New York Times: How Crowdsourcing Aided a Push to Preserve the Histories of Nazi Victims

New York Times: How Crowdsourcing Aided a Push to Preserve the Histories of Nazi Victims. “While the coronavirus pandemic has painfully upended lives and businesses around the world, the lockdowns it caused are providing a unique boost for one group’s effort to help heal a generations-old wound: Nazi atrocities. As the virus prompted lockdowns across Europe, the director of the Arolsen Archives — the world’s largest devoted to the victims of Nazi persecution — joined millions of others working remotely from home and spending lots more time in front of her computer.”

Jewish News Syndicate: Online database with 26 million documents on Nazi victims, survivors now online

Jewish News Syndicate: Online database with 26 million documents on Nazi victims, survivors now online. “The world’s most comprehensive archive on the victims and survivors of Nazi persecution reached a ‘milestone’ on Tuesday by publishing 26 million documents to its online database, including new information on forced laborers and deported Jews.”

Jewish News Syndicate: Museum of Jewish Heritage offers free online educational resources for those at home

Jewish News Syndicate: Museum of Jewish Heritage offers free online educational resources for those at home. “New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage–A Living Memorial to the Holocaust is offering several online resources for parents, teachers and students as the museum remains temporarily closed in accordance with COVID-19 social-distancing restrictions.”

The Local, Germany: New website shows how German industry used Auschwitz prisoners as slaves

The Local, Germany: New website shows how German industry used Auschwitz prisoners as slaves. “The site pulls together more than a decade of research on some 45 sub-camps or ‘kommandos’ located on the periphery of the most notorious site of the Nazi Holocaust. Based on first-hand accounts and research in the archives of the Auschwitz-Birkenau museum and others, the site contains more than 3,500 photos, documents and maps. It tells the story of each sub-camp, including lists of the survivors and SS guards and information about their personal stories. The site also lists the industrial organisations implicated in exploiting prisoners at the camps.”

Yale Daily News: Nazi archive managers plan collab

Yale Daily News: Nazi archive managers plan collab. “Staff from the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale — a collection of 4,400 video testimonies of Nazi persecution witnesses — joined with those from the Arolsen Archives — the largest paper collection of Nazi persecution victims, which is housed in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The two groups are looking to create a data service that brings the two libraries together. They said they hope to create a virtual interactive lab that adds to records found in the Arolsen Archives.”

Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum: destroyed identities — the digital reconstruction of Auschwitz-Birkenau victims’ data

Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum: Destroyed identities – the digital reconstruction of Auschwitz-Birkenau victims’ data. “One of the most important goals of the Repository is to collect dispersed documentation of transport lists to Auschwitz-Birkenau. ‘We must remember that about 900,000 Jews deported in mass transports from German-occupied Europe – women, children, and men – were murdered in the gas chambers immediately upon arrival at the camp without registration. There are no post-camp records of them. Transport lists may help us to establish their names,’ said the Director of the Museum, Dr. Piotr M. A. Cywiński. At the moment, the existing database, which contains information on persons registered in Auschwitz, is being merged with the data from the transport lists. Consequently, as early as in May 2020, the search results at http://www.auschwitz.org will be enriched with over 420,000 names from the transport lists of Jews deported to the camp.”

Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published

Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published. “In the winter of 1945/46, the four occupying powers issued orders to German local authorities, companies, the police, and other institutions requiring them to draw up lists of the foreign nationals, German Jews and stateless persons who were registered with them. Details of burial sites were to be included. A large collection of the documents created in this way as well as other lists from the American Zone of Occupation can now be viewed in the online archive of the Arolsen Archives. They contain information pertaining to around ten million names.”

Jewish communities: ‘Race against time’ to preserve south Wales history (BBC)

BBC: Jewish communities: ‘Race against time’ to preserve south Wales history. “Efforts have begun to preserve 250 years of Jewish history in south Wales, after historians warned there was a ‘race against time’ to record stories. The Jewish History Association of South Wales (JHASW) has been awarded a grant of almost £55,000 from the National Lottery Heritage Fund.”

Times of Israel: Yale launches Holocaust survivors podcast

Times of Israel: Yale launches Holocaust survivors podcast. “The series launched this week with the testimony of Martin Schiller, a Jewish man from Poland who described his experiences in the concentration and slave labor camps of Plaszow, Skarzysko-Kamienna, Buchenwald and Theresienstadt.”

USA Today: Ancestry will let you search online for relatives who were displaced by the Holocaust

USA Today: Ancestry will let you search online for relatives who were displaced by the Holocaust. “Ancestry is digitizing millions of Holocaust and Nazi-persecution records and making them searchable online for the first time ever. Anyone, not just Ancestry’s paid members, can explore the records at the company’s site.”

The Jerusalem Post: Italian Jewish Institutions In Search Of Historical Amateur Movies

The Jerusalem Post: Italian Jewish Institutions In Search Of Historical Amateur Movies. “Between July 1 and October 2, anyone who possesses amateur movies documenting Italian Jewish life, from before and in the aftermath of the Holocaust, is invited to reach out so that the material can be digitized and catalogued. ‘It is very hard to find footage as valuable as those filmed by Di Segni, or by the Ovazza family, shot between 1930 and 1936,’ CDEC director Gadi Luzzatto Voghera told the Italian Jewish paper Pagine Ebraiche on Monday. ‘For this reason, we are interested also in films from the period after the war.'”

WTOP: Holocaust Museum digitizing letters from Anne Frank’s father

WTOP: Holocaust Museum digitizing letters from Anne Frank’s father. “Ryan Cooper was a 20-something Californian unsure of his place in the world when he struck up a pen pal correspondence in the 1970s with Otto Frank, the father of the young Holocaust victim Anne Frank. Through dozens of letters and several face-to-face meetings, the two forged a friendship that lasted until Frank died in 1980 at the age of 91.”

SILive: Advance/SILive. com launches website featuring Holocaust survivor stories

SILive: Advance/SILive. com launches website featuring Holocaust survivor stories. “Today, the Advance/SILive.com proudly introduces our readers to a new website that has been nearly two years in the making. That’s how long multimedia specialist Shira Stoll has been working on a project to document the stories of Staten Island’s remaining Holocaust survivors.”

Arolsen Archives: More than 13 million documents online

Arolsen Archives: More than 13 million documents online. “The database contains a comprehensive collection of documents from concentration camps, including prisoner cards and death notices. The more than 13 million documents featuring information on over 2.2 million people persecuted by the Nazi Regime are part of the UNESCO’s World Documentary Heritage and are a key focus of the collection of the Arolsen Archives. This database is the first of several large collections scheduled to go online in future.”

New York Times: A Holocaust Story for the Social Media Generation

New York Times: A Holocaust Story for the Social Media Generation. “The teenager’s Instagram posts start out breezily enough. Eva Heyman, who just got her first pair of heels for her 13th birthday, films herself eating ice cream in the park. There’s also a teenage crush. But everything rapidly turns dark. Eva’s Instagram account, based on a diary kept by the real Eva Heyman in 1944, will go live Wednesday afternoon for the start of Israel’s annual Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Day.”