The Times: Holocaust victims’ remains found in Imperial War Museum archives

The Times: Holocaust victims’ remains found in Imperial War Museum archives. “More than 70 years after they were murdered at Auschwitz, six unknown Holocaust victims will be laid to rest after it was revealed that their remains have lain for decades in the Imperial War Museum archives. Unbeknown to Jewish leaders, the ashes and bone fragments, believed to belong to five adults and a child, have been in storage for more than 20 years since they were bequeathed in the late 1990s by a Holocaust survivor who took them during a visit to the Nazi death camp.” Sometimes I have to stop, take out my handkerchief, and cry for a few minutes.

ABC News: German archive releasing photos of Dachau camp survivors

ABC News: German archive releasing photos of Dachau camp survivors. “A repository of Holocaust-era documents says it has uncovered a trove of photographs of survivors of the Nazis’ Dachau concentration camp and will make them available online in a searchable archive this spring. The International Tracing Service said Monday the 2,000 photos of survivors were taken in the first year after the war to help Nazi victims who needed proof of their imprisonment to receive help from relief organizations.”

CNET: Facebook screws up again on the Holocaust, this time with photo of children

CNET: Facebook screws up again on the Holocaust, this time with photo of children. “The Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect last week called on its 112,000 followers to sign a petition demanding that Facebook remove pages denying the Holocaust from its site. That didn’t happen. Instead, a week later, Facebook removed a news article that the center posted about Holocaust education ‘for apparently violating community standards,’ the center said. The violation: It included a photo showing naked, emaciated children from a Nazi concentration camp.”

New York Times: Zuckerberg Tries to Clarify Remarks About Holocaust Deniers After Outcry

New York Times: Zuckerberg Tries to Clarify Remarks About Holocaust Deniers After Outcry. “Mark Zuckerberg, the Facebook chief executive, said in an interview published Wednesday that he would not automatically remove denials that the Holocaust took place from the site, a remark that caused an uproar online. Mr. Zuckerberg’s comments were made during an interview with the tech journalist Kara Swisher that was published on the site Recode. (Read the full transcript here.) Hours later, Mr. Zuckerberg tried to clarify his comments in an email to Recode.”

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany. “Two years ago, in preparation for the exhibition, the museum launched a crowd-sourcing project, ‘History Unfolded.’ Museum staff asked students, teachers, librarians and history buffs across the country to research their local newspapers and determine what kind of information their communities could have read or heard about Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. With the help of hundreds of students and dedicated volunteers, the museum built an extensive online archive of American newspaper coverage of key Holocaust events, including more than 12,000 articles from every U.S. state. Each submission is important historical evidence.”

Word Holocaust ‘dangerous and derogatory’: Google (Newsroom NZ)

Newsroom NZ: Word Holocaust ‘dangerous and derogatory’: Google. “A New Zealand photographer says he could no longer use the word ‘Holocaust’ to promote his video series on Holocaust survivors after it was disallowed by Google. Auckland photographer Perry Trotter says he used Google’s AdWords to promote his Shadows of Shoah exhibitions but all his ads were recently disallowed because they contained ‘dangerous and derogatory’ content.” This is almost a Facebook level of ridiculousness.

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research. “Looking at the list of names on Waitman Beorn’s computer screen is staggering. The eye blurs almost automatically as it searches through the 18,000 people – recorded by name, approximate birthdate and address – on the list compiled by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yet, these 18,000 are only a small fraction of the nearly 160,000 Jews who were placed into forced labor or systematically murdered under the brutal Nazi rule in Lviv, Ukraine.”