South China Morning Post: Older Hongkongers taking to online apps and social media for latest updates on protests, and some may join rallies too

South China Morning Post: Older Hongkongers taking to online apps and social media for latest updates on protests, and some may join rallies too . “Retired schoolteacher Bill Lau, 66, first learned about the messaging app Telegram and online forum LIHKG – platforms popular with protesters – from his friends and younger daughter respectively. Curious, he downloaded Telegram and started checking out LIHKG links from his daughter, and now spends at least half an hour on them each day.”

Deutsche Welle: Hong Kong protesters personal data leaked by Russian website

Deutsche Welle: Hong Kong protesters personal data leaked by Russian website. “A website registered on a Russian domain has shared detailed personal information of dozens of Hong Kong protesters and journalists. Observers view it as another serious blow to the city’s dwindling civil liberties.”

Washington Post: TikTok’s Beijing roots fuel censorship suspicion as it builds a huge U.S. audience

Washington Post: TikTok’s Beijing roots fuel censorship suspicion as it builds a huge U.S. audience. “A search for “#hongkong” on Twitter reveals a vast visual patchwork of the city’s unavoidable protests, including pro-China agitprop, sympathetic memes and imagery from the hundreds of thousands of pro-democracy marchers who have braved police crackdowns. But the same searches for Hong Kong on TikTok, the short-video app from a Beijing-based tech giant that has gone viral in the U.S., reveal a remarkably different — and, for the Chinese government, more politically convenient — version of reality: playful selfies, food photos and singalongs, with barely a hint of unrest in sight.”

BBC: Hong Kong protesters using Bluetooth Bridgefy app

BBC: Hong Kong protesters using Bluetooth Bridgefy app. “Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong have been turning to a new app to communicate – one that does not use the internet and is therefore harder for the Chinese authorities to trace. Bridgefy is based on Bluetooth and allows protesters to communicate with each other without internet connection.”

Exclusive: Messaging app Telegram moves to protect identity of Hong Kong protesters (Reuters)

Reuters: Exclusive: Messaging app Telegram moves to protect identity of Hong Kong protesters. “The update to Telegram, planned for release over the next few days, will allow protesters to prevent mainland Chinese and Hong Kong authorities from discovering their identities in the app’s large group chats.”

TechCrunch: The Hong Kong Internet Service Providers Association warns that restricting online access would be ruinous for the region

TechCrunch: The Hong Kong Internet Service Providers Association warns that restricting online access would be ruinous for the region. “After Hong Kong’s leader suggested she may invoke emergency powers that could potentially include limiting internet access, one of the city’s biggest industry groups warned that ‘any such restrictions, however slight originally, would start the end of the open Internet of Hong Kong.'”

ScreenRant: China Accused of Using Twitter Bots To Promote Disney’s Mulan After Hong Kong Backlash

ScreenRant: China Accused of Using Twitter Bots To Promote Disney’s Mulan After Hong Kong Backlash. “China is reportedly using Twitter bots to promote Mulan after Hong Kong backlash. The new live-action remake of Disney’s hit 1998 animated feature, Mulan, is due to arrive in theatres next spring. Lately, however, the film has been hit with a substantial bit of controversy over allegiances in the ongoing Hong Kong protests.”