New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications

New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications. “The city’s government on Friday said it would begin blocking the distribution of films that are deemed to undermine national security, marking the official arrival of mainland Chinese-style censorship in one of Asia’s most celebrated filmmaking hubs.”

Quartz: Hong Kongers are using blockchain archives to fight government censorship

Quartz: Hong Kongers are using blockchain archives to fight government censorship. “Using blockchain to bypass censorship is not new. In 2018, for example, #MeToo activists in China used the Ethereum blockchain to preserve an open letter by a Peking University student who said she was being pressured by the administration to cease her activism on a sexual assault case.”

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong protests: former RTHK journalist Bao Choy to appeal conviction over database search, fearing lifelong regret if she gives up ‘pursuit of justice’

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong protests: former RTHK journalist Bao Choy to appeal conviction over database search, fearing lifelong regret if she gives up ‘pursuit of justice’. “A former journalist at Hong Kong’s public broadcaster is appealing against her conviction for improperly accessing public records during the making of a documentary critical of how police handled a 2019 mob attack, saying letting the case go now would be a source of lifelong regret.”

The Standard (Hong Kong): RTHK plan to delete content spurs online push

The Standard (Hong Kong): RTHK plan to delete content spurs online push. “People online are discussing plans to back up [Radio Television Hong Kong] programs after the public broadcaster said it will delete content that is more than a year old from its YouTube and Facebook. They called on others to download their favorite RTHK programs and reupload them to another platform, with some even providing step-by-step tutorials teaching others how to download programs from YouTube.”

AppleDaily: Brit builds online archive of Hong Kong’s colonial history

New-to-Me, from AppleDaily: Brit builds online archive of Hong Kong’s colonial history . “‘Gwulo: Old Hong Kong’ has over 34,000 articles and 20,000 historic photos, spanning from the British annexation of Hong Kong in 1842 until the handover to China in 1997. The site covers the Japanese occupation during the Second World War, the history of local districts and even the evolution of streetlight. It has attracted a massive following of history fans from across the globe.”

Hong Kong Free Press: Activist sets up online archive to highlight ‘political’ editing of Hong Kong school textbooks

Hong Kong Free Press: Activist sets up online archive to highlight ‘political’ editing of Hong Kong school textbooks. “A pro-democracy activist and his newly-founded group Education Breakthrough have set up an online archive dedicated to highlighting what they describe as politically motivated changes to Hong Kong school textbooks aimed at showing China in a better light.”

Editorial: HKFP launches permanent digital archive of the History Museum’s ‘Hong Kong Story’(Hong Kong Free Press)

Hong Kong Free Press: Editorial: HKFP launches permanent digital archive of the History Museum’s ‘Hong Kong Story’. “On October 18, 2020, hundreds of Hongkongers queued for hours to pay a visit to the city’s History Museum. It was its last day before the permanent exhibition ‘Hong Kong Story’ closed for an extensive two-year revamp. There were fears that the new displays may censor or exclude politically sensitive events such as the city’s colonial history and its relationship with China….Ahead of the closure, HKFP paid a visit in order to capture a visual archive of the exhibit.”

Global Voices: Fearing the national security law, Hongkongers change their social media habits

Global Voices: Fearing the national security law, Hongkongers change their social media habits. “Between August 29 and September 1, The Stand News asked its readers, through a series of online polls, how the national security law impacted their lives. The results of the survey, in which 2,587 people took part, are published in this story, which comes along with interviews with protesters, journalists, civil servants, teachers, and others. We wanted to find out how they are managing their fear under the new draconian law.”

AP: Hong Kong begins mass testing for virus amid public doubts

AP: Hong Kong begins mass testing for virus amid public doubts. “Hong Kong tested more than 120,000 people for the coronavirus [September 1] at the start of a mass-testing effort that’s become another political flash point in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. Volunteers stood in lines at some of the more than 100 testing centers, though many residents are distrustful of the resources and staff being provided by China’s central government and some have expressed fear DNA could be collected.”

Washington Post: First coronavirus reinfection documented in Hong Kong, researchers say

Washington Post: First coronavirus reinfection documented in Hong Kong, researchers say. “A Hong Kong man who was initially infected with the coronavirus in March and made a full recovery was reinfected more than four months later after a trip abroad, researchers reported Monday. The pre-print study, by a team at the University of Hong Kong, purports to be ‘the world’s first documentation’ of a patient who recovered from covid-19 becoming reinfected. Researchers sequenced the genome of his first and second infections to show the virus strains were different, suggesting he had been reinfected,”

LiveMint: Google, Facebook dump Hong Kong cable after US security alarm

LiveMint: Google, Facebook dump Hong Kong cable after US security alarm. “Google and Facebook Inc. dropped plans for an undersea cable between the U.S. and Hong Kong after the Trump administration said Beijing might use the link to collect information on Americans. But the companies quickly submitted a revised proposal that includes links to Taiwan and the Philippines, as envisioned in the application that was withdrawn on Thursday.”

CBC: Google stops responding directly to data requests from Hong Kong government

CBC: Google stops responding directly to data requests from Hong Kong government. “Alphabet Inc.’s Google said on Friday it would no longer provide data in response to requests from Hong Kong authorities following the enactment of a new national security law imposed by China. The U.S. tech giant had not produced any data since the sweeping new law took force in June and would not directly respond to such requests henceforth, it added.”

Hong Kong Protest Movement Data Archive: Poster Search Engine (Hong Kong Free Press)

Found at the Hong Kong Free Press: Hong Kong Protest Movement Data Archive: Poster Search Engine. From the “Methodology and sourcing” section: “The Poster Search Engine allows for text inside the movement posters to be searchable. In total, 23,366 posters have been collected from two major movement publicity Telegram channels: 777文宣傳播稿件大合集 and 反送中文宣谷 covering the movement up until January 23, 2020 and January 18, 2020 respectively. The text inside the posters was OCR-extracted by Google Docs, tokenised, and indexed. OCR errors were manually corrected by a team of Cantonese-speaking human editors who understand the context.”