KRON4: Hong Kong Disneyland to close again amid new COVID-19 outbreak in China

KRON4: Hong Kong Disneyland to close again amid new COVID-19 outbreak in China. “Hong Kong Disneyland is closing after a new outbreak of COVID-19 cases in China amid the coronavirus pandemic. CNN reports the resort will close July 15 until further notice. The park had reopened less than a month ago on June 18 after closing late January during the first surge of coronavirus cases.”

Reuters: Hong Kong Tiananmen museum turns to digitalisation after new law

Reuters: Hong Kong Tiananmen museum turns to digitalisation after new law. “A Hong Kong museum chronicling the crackdown by Chinese troops on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square is raising funds to digitalise its collection as concerns over a new national security law create uncertainty over its future.”

NPR: How Hong Kong Reopened Schools — And Why It Closed Them Again

NPR: How Hong Kong Reopened Schools — And Why It Closed Them Again. “When Hong Kong appeared to be winning its war against COVID-19, schools started to reopen. That was the end of May. Things looked promising: From June 13 to July 5 there were no locally transmitted cases in Hong Kong. But the city is now fighting a third wave of infections, and the education bureau announced that the school year would end on Friday — about a week before the scheduled last day in mid-July.”

Mashable: TikTok will exit Hong Kong amidst controversial national security laws

Mashable: TikTok will exit Hong Kong amidst controversial national security laws. “TikTok will pull out of Hong Kong within days, becoming the latest of several tech companies to react to the region’s controversial new national security laws. The short-form video app announced its impending withdrawal from Hong Kong on Monday, with the news coming in the wake of new laws brought into effect on June 30.”

BBC: Microsoft and Zoom join Hong Kong data ‘pause’

BBC: Microsoft and Zoom join Hong Kong data ‘pause’. “Microsoft and Zoom have said they will not process data requests made by the Hong Kong authorities while they take stock of a new security law. They follow Facebook, Google, Twitter and the chat app Telegram, which had already announced similar ‘pauses’ in compliance over the past two days.”

Business Standard: Facebook, Google, Twitter suspend processing Hong Kong govt data requests

Business Standard: Facebook, Google, Twitter suspend processing Hong Kong govt data requests. “Facebook Inc, Google Inc and Twitter Inc suspended processing government requests for user data in Hong Kong, they said on Monday, following China’s establishment of a sweeping new national security law for the semi-autonomous city.”

International Business Times: Hong Kong Residents Erase Social Media Posts As New Security Law Applied

International Business Times: Hong Kong Residents Erase Social Media Posts As New Security Law Applied. “As Beijing enacted the new national security laws, Hong Kong people are rushing to significantly change their digital presence or entirely remove their social media presence. Residents were already imposing wide self-censorship before the law came into effect. Several users deactivated accounts that had content that could be considered ‘objectionable’ under the new law.”

Coronavirus: Hong Kong will allow public gatherings of up to 50 people (Straits Times)

Straits Times: Coronavirus: Hong Kong will allow public gatherings of up to 50 people. “Hong Kong will further relax virus-related social distancing measures by allowing public gatherings of up to 50 people, as the city continues to be a rare global success story in containing Covid-19. Top health official Sophia Chan said the easing would go into effect on Friday (June 19), dramatically raising the size of gatherings from just eight people.”

South China Morning Post: Why delay in passing Hong Kong archives law does not surprise

South China Morning Post: Why delay in passing Hong Kong archives law does not surprise. “Delay would appear to be the default position for matters relating to government records and archives. It is now seven years since the Law Reform Commission, at the request of the administration, established a subcommittee to consider the need for legislation for the management of government records and archives, and the public is still waiting for the subcommittee’s final report and recommendations.”

Hong Kong Free Press: Why did Google abandon plans to open in Hong Kong? After seven years, a clue

Hong Kong Free Press: Why did Google abandon plans to open in Hong Kong? After seven years, a clue. “Google scrapped their plans to open a data centre on the Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate site in 2013, which signalled its withdrawal from investing in Hong Kong. The company has never properly explained the withdrawal. But we may now — after seven years of speculation — be able to draw some conclusions from the clues given by the court judgment in a judicial review case between Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks (operators of the Tseung Kwan O estate) and a locally owned data centre company.”

TimeOut: Hong Kong art galleries offering virtual tours and online viewing rooms

TimeOut: Hong Kong art galleries offering virtual tours and online viewing rooms. “Like many establishments in our city, Hong Kong’s art galleries have been hit hard due to the ongoing pandemic. Many shows have cancelled, postponed, and galleries have temporarily closed or have limited their on-ground visits to private viewing only. Some local galleries have turned online to deliver the viewing experience straight to your home.”

Exclusive: Support for Hong Kong protesters’ demands rises even as coronavirus halts rallies: poll (Reuters)

Reuters: Exclusive: Support for Hong Kong protesters’ demands rises even as coronavirus halts rallies: poll. “Support for the demands of pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong has grown even as rallies have paused due to the coronavirus outbreak, according to a survey conducted for Reuters that also showed a widespread lack of confidence in the government’s ability to manage the COVID-19 crisis.”

ZDNet: Google removes WhatsGap from app store

ZDNet: Google removes WhatsGap from app store. “Search engine giant Google has removed popular Hong Kong pro-democracy mapping app WhatsGap from its app store. WhatsGap is an app used to identify retailers that are in support of Hong Kong’s democracy. Google told ZDNet the removal of WhatsGap was sparked by ‘sensitive content’ that was being published on the app.”

BBC: Hong Kong and mainland China gamers clash on GTA V

BBC: Hong Kong and mainland China gamers clash on GTA V. “The Hong Kong protests are being played out on Grand Theft Auto (GTA) V online. Players in Hong Kong realised they could dress up as protesters after a new update for the game was released earlier this month. They spread the word on LIHKG – which has been called the Hong Kong version of social news site Reddit – and started organising violent expeditions.”

Abacus News: Doxxing of Hong Kong children spurs new Facebook policies

Abacus News: Doxxing of Hong Kong children spurs new Facebook policies. “Social media giant Facebook introduced a new policy to protect minors after children of Hong Kong police officers became victims of doxxing attacks during the city’s ongoing anti-government protests, its content manager revealed on Wednesday. Under the policy that was implemented worldwide in September, Facebook removes content designed to identify children and create risks to their safety.”