Just Launched: #MeToo and the Women’s Rights Movement in China Web Archive (Columbia University Libraries)

Columbia University Libraries: Just Launched: #MeToo and the Women’s Rights Movement in China Web Archive. “I am pleased to announce the launch of the #MeToo and the Women’s Rights Movement in China Web Archive, comprised of captured website content from women’s organizations and individuals in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Curated by Chengzhi Wang, Chinese Studies Librarian at Columbia University, and Xiao-He Ma, Librarian for the Chinese Collection at Harvard University, the archive aims to systematically archive and preserve web content related to the #MeToo movement and women’s rights activities in the Greater China Region, so that scholars and students will be able to continuously be able to access these important, and potentially ephemeral, materials.”

South China Morning Post: Roadsign search engine for mental health services in Hong Kong points patients on path to recovery

South China Morning Post: Roadsign search engine for mental health services in Hong Kong points patients on path to recovery. “Keyword searches on the website enable users to call up services by location, nature of organisation, type of mental disorder, or service cost, among other categories. Under each entry, there is additional information about target patient groups and how to apply for help.”

South China Morning Post: Time to press ahead with archive law

South China Morning Post: Time to press ahead with archive law. “Just how tall is 4,488 metres? This is roughly half of Mount Everest in height or five of Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. Intriguingly, it is also the height of the documents destroyed by the Hong Kong government last year. The volume was a three-year high, according to the city’s official records agency. The figure certainly does nothing for the government’s environmental protection credentials. But for a bureaucracy overseeing a sophisticated city of 7 million people, such a volume may well be the result of vigorous control and restraints. However, the lack of legal supervision and sanctions means the public is unable to tell whether this is the case.”

South China Morning Post: Tapes, photos and meeting arrangements made via WhatsApp should all fall under proposed archives law, former Hong Kong official says

South China Morning Post: Tapes, photos and meeting arrangements made via WhatsApp should all fall under proposed archives law, former Hong Kong official says. “Informal consultations held by the authorities and meeting arrangements made via instant messaging apps are some of the items that should be put on the record if Hong Kong passes an archives law, a former government records official said on Friday.”

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong courts must open up about their work, and this means joining social media

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong courts must open up about their work, and this means joining social media. “Cliff Buddle says judges have been attacked for recent rulings, but scant attention is given to the reasoning behind judgments. To educate the public, the judiciary should get on social media platforms and even consider a bold move Britain has made – allowing filming in courts.”

South China Morning Post: One-stop Hong Kong database portal planned by 2023 to ease information gathering and spur ‘smart city’ development

South China Morning Post: One-stop Hong Kong database portal planned by 2023 to ease information gathering and spur ‘smart city’ development . “For contractors planning to develop a piece of land in Hong Kong, it can be a nightmare trying to get hold of crucial data detailing what goes on underground. Information such as the locations and numbers of subterranean cables sits in the hands of private electricity companies, while public water and drainage pipes are managed by the government and gas pipes are overseen by the city’s main energy supplier, Towngas. But officials are hoping to shorten the painstaking process by building a one-stop portal to open up and centralise the data and help transform Hong Kong into a smart city.”

The Guardian: Hong Kong democracy activists urge UK to release unseen files

The Guardian: Hong Kong democracy activists urge UK to release unseen files. “The documents were transferred to the UK when Hong Kong returned to China in 1997 and include material on the region’s future after handover. Activists believe they could cast fresh light on current disputes and also fear that records on events that Beijing deems sensitive – such as deadly riots in 1967 – could otherwise be lost forever.”

South China Morning Post: Social media posts supporting Hong Kong poll candidates can land you in jail for 3 years, but relaxation of rules in sight

South China Morning Post: Social media posts supporting Hong Kong poll candidates can land you in jail for 3 years, but relaxation of rules in sight. “Expressing support for a Hong Kong election candidate on social media would no longer be a criminal offence in future under a government plan to relax the city’s strict rules on what constitutes an election advert.”

Reuters: Hong Kong’s vanishing archives and the battle to preserve history

Reuters: Hong Kong’s vanishing archives and the battle to preserve history. “For anyone digging into Hong Kong’s history, the official archives might not be the place to look. The office of the chief executive, Hong Kong’s leader, failed to hand over any official records at all for eight of the 20 years since it came under Chinese rule in 1997, according to the government department that manages the archives. The Security Bureau only did it for 10.”

South China Morning Post: Social media becomes the new battleground for Hong Kong’s political parties

South China Morning Post: Social media becomes the new battleground for Hong Kong’s political parties. “With the main elections over, political parties are switching their battleground to social ­media, aiming to widen their reach in the community and ­consolidate their support base. Among those leading the way is the Democratic Party, which is launching its own broadcasting channel this summer, but its focus will not be just politics.”

Berkeley News: C.V. Starr East Asian Library acquires massive and rare Chinese film studies collection

Berkeley News: C.V. Starr East Asian Library acquires massive and rare Chinese film studies collection. “Paul Fonoroff has two rules when it comes to collecting. ‘You have to be passionate about it,’ he deadpans. ‘And it has to be something that no one else is interested in.’ That maxim helped the Cleveland native amass over 70,000 movie posters, periodicals, photos, lobby cards, theater flyers and other movie ephemera while he lived in Beijing and Hong Kong. Fonoroff’s massive collection — which is the largest of its kind in North America and rivals what can be found at film archives in Asia — was recently acquired by UC Berkeley’s C.V. Starr East Asian Library, opening an enormous cache to researchers and the public.”

South China Morning Post: Laptops containing 3.7 million Hong Kong voters’ data stolen after chief executive election

South China Morning Post: Laptops containing 3.7 million Hong Kong voters’ data stolen after chief executive election. “In what could be one of Hong Kong’s most significant data breaches ever, the personal information of the city’s 3.7 million voters was possibly compromised after the Registration and Electoral Office reported two laptop computers went missing at its backup venue for the chief executive election.”