Hong Kong Free Press: China is the obstacle to Google’s plan to end internet censorship

Hong Kong Free Press: China is the obstacle to Google’s plan to end internet censorship. “It’s been three years since Eric Schmidt proclaimed that Google would chart a course to ending online censorship within ten years. Now is a great time to check on Google’s progress, reassess the landscape, benchmark Google’s efforts against others who share the same goal, postulate on the China strategy and offer suggestions on how they might effectively move forward.”

Quartz: The “Facebook impact” on elections is real, and significant—just look at Hong Kong’s last vote

Quartz: The “Facebook impact” on elections is real, and significant—just look at Hong Kong’s last vote. “As the US presidential election nears, analysts are speculating about the potential impact Facebook may have on turnout, and who ultimately wins the race. Hong Kong’s election may provide some clues. In Hong Kong, the ‘Facebook effect’ pushed younger, more liberal, voters to the polls and led to an upset in what was once one of the city’s most conservative, Beijing-leaning districts.”

Google Street View, Now With More Staircases

Google Street View has added a bunch of… staircases? “Historic staircases in Hong Kong’s concrete jungle can now be viewed by people anywhere in the world on a computer or smartphone using the Street View function of Google Maps, Headline Daily reported Tuesday. Among the 14 streets with stone steps that are part of the collection, Duddell Street in Central, which has been featured in movies, features four gas lamps that are nowhere else to be found in the city and earn it the nickname Gas Lamp Street.”

More Google Maps Shenanigans, This Time in Hong Kong

Google can make self-driving cars and really cool robots, but preventing Google Maps shenanigans is still a bit beyond it. “A fake cafe, apparently calling for the removal of Hong Kong’s chief executive appeared on Google Maps on Wednesday in an apparent anti-government protest. The imaginary eatery, named Down 689, featured on a map of the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront, on the Avenue of Stars.”

Periscope Is Proving Useful to Hong Kong Tourism

Fascinating article from the South China Morning Post: The Periscope stars: Hong Kong’s unofficial tourism ambassadors “A small community of Hongkongers armed with mobile phones is giving the world unique perspectives on the city. The dedicated users of Periscope, Twitter’s popular live-streaming app, have inadvertently become unofficial tourism ambassadors for Hong Kong – at a time when the Hong Kong Tourism Board is seeking to reverse a drop in visitor numbers.”