ThreatPost: Millions of Hotel Guests Worldwide Caught Up in Mass Data Leak

ThreatPost: Millions of Hotel Guests Worldwide Caught Up in Mass Data Leak. “A widely used hotel reservation platform has exposed 10 million files related to guests at various hotels around the world, thanks to a misconfigured Amazon Web Services S3 bucket. The records include sensitive data, including credit-card details.”

6SqFt: NYC’s landmarked Roosevelt Hotel will close after 96 years due to pandemic

6SqFt: NYC’s landmarked Roosevelt Hotel will close after 96 years due to pandemic. “When the Roosevelt Hotel opened on East 45th Street in 1924, it was connected to Grand Central via an underground tunnel, signaling its prominence among New York’s Jazz Age society. But nearly 100 years later, the Midtown hotel will shut it doors for good on October 31.”

New York Times: American Could Face Prison in Thailand After Posting Negative Reviews of a Resort

New York Times: American Could Face Prison in Thailand After Posting Negative Reviews of a Resort. “An American man who lives in Thailand was unhappy that a resort hotel wanted to charge him a $15 corkage fee for bringing his own bottle of gin to the restaurant. He argued with a manager and then later did what has become second nature for disgruntled tourists: He posted negative reviews of the resort online.” Apparently the resort is willing to settle with the guest, but I don’t know if it happened. No recent news on a quick search.

New York Times: Lumberjack, Tailor, Counselor, Host: A Hotel Owner Does It All in the Pandemic

New York Times: Lumberjack, Tailor, Counselor, Host: A Hotel Owner Does It All in the Pandemic. “As the head of a small business, Mr. Patel, whose family owns eight budget hotel franchises, was used to wearing multiple hats. But since March, when the long-haul drivers, families on road trips and business travelers who made up most of his clientele stopped checking in, forcing him to lay off workers and hunt for cash, Mr. Patel has become a one-man army battling for the survival of his business. Its death would be no less than the extinguishing of an American dream.”

Los Angeles Times: ‘Tsunami’ of hotel closures is coming, experts warn

Los Angeles Times: ‘Tsunami’ of hotel closures is coming, experts warn. “The Luxe Rodeo Drive is the first high-end hotel in the Los Angeles area to go out of business because of the pandemic, and industry experts point to an unusually high loan delinquency rate among hotel borrowers as a sign that more closures are likely to follow. ‘We know there is a tsunami outside. We know it’s going to hit the beach. We just don’t know when,’ said Donald Wise, a commercial real estate expert and co-founder and senior managing director at Turnbull Capital Group.”

New York Times: Struggling Hotel Owners, Some With Trump Ties, Seek Federal Bailout

New York Times: Struggling Hotel Owners, Some With Trump Ties, Seek Federal Bailout. “The precarious financial position that some friends of Mr. Trump and other hotel executives are now in has fueled an intense lobbying campaign aimed at persuading the Trump administration, the Federal Reserve and Congress to rescue hundreds of hotel industry players that relied on riskier Wall Street debt to finance their lodging empires before the virus hit.”

The City NYC: Former Inmates Threatened with Early Checkout from Taxpayer-Funded Hotel Rooms

The City NYC: Former Inmates Threatened with Early Checkout from Taxpayer-Funded Hotel Rooms. “The de Blasio administration is seeking reimbursement for the COVID Emergency Housing program from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which has recently moved to yank funding for disinfecting New York City trains and schools. The city has contracted with multiple social service nonprofits and the hotels until Oct. 31.”

Inside Edition: Investigation Finds Sheets Weren’t Changed Between Guests at Some New York Hotels

Inside Edition: Investigation Finds Sheets Weren’t Changed Between Guests at Some New York Hotels. “Inside Edition producers checked into different New York City hotel rooms and used a harmless, washable spray to apply an Inside Edition logo – only visible under UV light – to the pillows, bed sheets and bath towels. Commonly touched surfaces, including the TV remote, thermostat and desk were also marked with a special washable gel. After marking the room, Inside Edition producers left the beds at all three locations looking like they’d been slept in and then checked out. The following day, using a new reservation with a different guest name, Inside Edition checked back into the exact same rooms to see if housekeeping had changed the linens and wiped down various surfaces.”

New York Times: New York Put Recovering Virus Patients in Hotels. Soon, 4 Were Dead.

New York Times: New York Put Recovering Virus Patients in Hotels. Soon, 4 Were Dead.. “When Robert Rowe Jr. was discharged from the hospital this month after testing positive for the coronavirus, he needed a place to stay so he would not put his 84-year-old father at risk. New York City health officials put him up at a three-star hotel in Midtown Manhattan. The room was provided under a city program that was intended to protect recovering patients’ families and roommates. Case workers are supposed to check on the patients twice a day by telephone. But on Saturday, Mr. Rowe, 56, was found dead in his room at the Hilton Garden Inn on West 37th Street, nearly 20 hours after a city worker last phoned him, though it was unclear whether he picked up.”

USA Today: Hilton, Marriott donate free hotel rooms for medical workers responding to coronavirus crisis

USA Today: Hilton, Marriott donate free hotel rooms for medical workers responding to coronavirus crisis. “Beginning [yesterday], Hilton and American Express will donate 1 million hotel rooms for medical professionals working on the coronavirus pandemic response. The rooms will be available to doctors, nurses, paramedics, emergency medical technicians and other workers through the end of May, according to Hilton.”

Exclusive: Details of 10.6 million MGM hotel guests posted on a hacking forum (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Exclusive: Details of 10.6 million MGM hotel guests posted on a hacking forum. “The personal details of more than 10.6 million users who stayed at MGM Resorts hotels have been published on a hacking forum this week. Besides details for regular tourists and travelers, included in the leaked files are also personal and contact details for celebrities, tech CEOs, reporters, government officials, and employees at some of the world’s largest tech companies.”

ZDNet: Search engine for Japanese sex hotels announces security breach

ZDNet: Search engine for Japanese sex hotels announces security breach. “HappyHotel, a Japanese search engine for finding and booking rooms in ‘love hotels,’ disclosed a security breach at the end of last year. Love hotels are hotels built and operated primarily for allowing guests privacy for sexual activities.”

UCLA Anderson School of Management: That Online Hotel Review You Wrote? It Matters

UCLA Anderson School of Management: That Online Hotel Review You Wrote? It Matters. “Research by UCLA Anderson’s Brett Hollenbeck, University of Toronto’s Sridhar Moorthy and University of Southern California’s Davide Proserpio suggests that hotels with favorable overall consumer reviews have been able to treat those ratings as a substitute for advertising: They have notably reduced ad spending as their online quality ratings have risen. By contrast, hotels with relatively poor online reviews have had to use ad spending to substitute for their lack of strong consumer recommendations, according to the paper, forthcoming in Marketing Science.”

Bloomberg Businessweek: The Hotel Hackers Are Hiding in the Remote Control Curtains

Bloomberg Businessweek: The Hotel Hackers Are Hiding in the Remote Control Curtains. “Hackers target financial institutions because that’s where the money is, and they target retail chains because that’s where people spend the money. Hotels might be a less obvious target, but they’re hacked almost as often because of the valuable data that passes through them, like credit cards and trade secrets.”