NCSU: The Brave New World of Social Media Screening for New Hires

NCSU: The Brave New World of Social Media Screening for New Hires. “As social media has proliferated, employers have increasingly been using online information to evaluate job candidates. Recent survey data suggest that 43 percent of organizations screen job candidates by using social media or online search engines. In some cases, employers require that applicants provide passwords to their social media profiles to allow for easier viewing. Despite the increasing use of these hiring practices, relatively little is known about them. What kinds of information are recruiters looking for and where do they look for it? What kinds of guidelines do they follow to protect the privacy of job applicants and to guard against bias?”

Engadget: Google says its own analysis shows ‘no gender pay gap’

Engadget: Google says its own analysis shows ‘no gender pay gap’. “In a new post on pay equity, Google VP Eileen Naughton says the company was ‘taken aback’ by the US Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) accusation that it paid women less than men, especially since the regulator gave no data to back up the claim. To counter it, the company supplied its own study that it called ‘extremely scientific and robust,’ showing that women and men are paid equally at the firm with a 95 percent confidence rating.” What else are they going to say?

The Guardian: Google accused of ‘extreme’ gender pay discrimination by US labor department

The Guardian: Google accused of ‘extreme’ gender pay discrimination by US labor department. “Google has discriminated against its female employees, according to the US Department of Labor (DoL), which said it had evidence of ‘systemic compensation disparities’. As part of an ongoing DoL investigation, the government has collected information that suggests the internet search giant is violating federal employment laws with its salaries for women, agency officials said.”

Inc: Google Makes Employees Sign Away Right to Sue Over Pornography (and Lots of Other Rights, Too)

Inc: Google Makes Employees Sign Away Right to Sue Over Pornography (and Lots of Other Rights, Too). “Google would rather you didn’t know about this because the company doesn’t want you to know anything at all about what it’s like to work at Google other than information the company itself has released. That, ironically, is the subject of a lawsuit that made the I-won’t-sue-for-pornography waiver public as part of a court filing. Here it is…”

CNBC: You’re fired! How to decide when a tweet goes too far

CNBC: You’re fired! How to decide when a tweet goes too far. “A tweet targeting a sympathetic figure is surely more upsetting than a tweet targeting a jerk. But if the tone and content of the message is cruel, unkind or otherwise not the kind of thing that someone who gets the company’s values would say, then it would seem that even an offensive tweet targeting an unsympathetic person should result in a firing.”

Don’t Friend My Friends: Nonsolicitation Agreements Should Account for Social Media Strategies (JD Supra)

JD Supra: Don’t Friend My Friends: Nonsolicitation Agreements Should Account for Social Media Strategies. “As social media becomes an important part of many companies’ sales and branding strategies, issues relating to companies’ ability to protect their investments in such strategies are emerging. Indeed, this blog has previously covered whether LinkedIn contacts can qualify as trade secrets (answer: maybe). Another such issue, recently addressed in a district court in Idaho, is whether and to what extent a nonsolicitation agreement can restrict a former employee’s Facebook interactions with the former employer’s customers.”

UK Employment Tribunal Decisions Go Online

UK employment tribunal decisions are now available online. “A new webpage listing employment tribunal decisions has been launched on the gov.uk website. The webpage allows the public to search for first-instance judgments from England, Wales and Scotland using drop-down menus and a free-text search.” It looks like about 140 decisions are online at this point, mostly from England and Wales – only 12 decisions are available for Scotland that I could see. The site also has an RSS feed!