Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum: destroyed identities — the digital reconstruction of Auschwitz-Birkenau victims’ data

Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum: Destroyed identities – the digital reconstruction of Auschwitz-Birkenau victims’ data. “One of the most important goals of the Repository is to collect dispersed documentation of transport lists to Auschwitz-Birkenau. ‘We must remember that about 900,000 Jews deported in mass transports from German-occupied Europe – women, children, and men – were murdered in the gas chambers immediately upon arrival at the camp without registration. There are no post-camp records of them. Transport lists may help us to establish their names,’ said the Director of the Museum, Dr. Piotr M. A. Cywiński. At the moment, the existing database, which contains information on persons registered in Auschwitz, is being merged with the data from the transport lists. Consequently, as early as in May 2020, the search results at http://www.auschwitz.org will be enriched with over 420,000 names from the transport lists of Jews deported to the camp.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Tool Helps Human Rights Workers Seek Justice

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Tool Helps Human Rights Workers Seek Justice. “Interdisciplinary researchers at CMU created a tool that can scan thousands of hours of multimedia in a matter of minutes. It can help human rights practitioners build cases against war criminals.”

University of Toronto: Global Database of Atrocities on Cameroon Crisis

University of Toronto: Global Database of Atrocities on Cameroon Crisis. “The database will aggregate, verify, secure, and publish information about atrocities or crimes against humanity committed by Cameroonian military and non-state armed groups. It is non-partisan and apolitical. All documentation will be securely stored and published online with four main objectives in mind: international justice processes; a possible national truth, justice, and reconciliation commission; advocacy, journalism, academic research; and deterrence from further violence and gross impunity.”

Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published

Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published. “In the winter of 1945/46, the four occupying powers issued orders to German local authorities, companies, the police, and other institutions requiring them to draw up lists of the foreign nationals, German Jews and stateless persons who were registered with them. Details of burial sites were to be included. A large collection of the documents created in this way as well as other lists from the American Zone of Occupation can now be viewed in the online archive of the Arolsen Archives. They contain information pertaining to around ten million names.”

BBC: How Silicon Valley enables online slave markets

BBC: How Silicon Valley enables online slave markets. “Drive around the streets of Kuwait and you won’t see these women. They are behind closed doors, deprived of their basic rights, unable to leave and at risk of being sold to the highest bidder. But pick up a smartphone and you can scroll through thousands of their pictures, categorised by race, and available to buy for a few thousand dollars.”

Times of Israel: Yale launches Holocaust survivors podcast

Times of Israel: Yale launches Holocaust survivors podcast. “The series launched this week with the testimony of Martin Schiller, a Jewish man from Poland who described his experiences in the concentration and slave labor camps of Plaszow, Skarzysko-Kamienna, Buchenwald and Theresienstadt.”

North Korea: how public execution sites are being mapped with Google Earth satellite images (The Conversation)

The Conversation: North Korea: how public execution sites are being mapped with Google Earth satellite images. “The researchers show North Korean escapees Google Earth satellite images of areas of the country where the escapees either lived or spent considerable periods of time. Focusing on images dating from around the time the reported events took place, where available, researchers then ask interviewees to point out the locations of any killing or body disposal sites of which they have knowledge.”