USA Today: Ancestry will let you search online for relatives who were displaced by the Holocaust

USA Today: Ancestry will let you search online for relatives who were displaced by the Holocaust. “Ancestry is digitizing millions of Holocaust and Nazi-persecution records and making them searchable online for the first time ever. Anyone, not just Ancestry’s paid members, can explore the records at the company’s site.”

EurekAlert: 3D slave ship model brings a harrowing story to life

EurekAlert: 3D slave ship model brings a harrowing story to life. “A 3D model of an 18th century slave ship, which captures the cramped, dirty and stifling conditions experienced by enslaved Africans, has been launched as a new digital teaching tool.”

OpenDemocracy: Ukraine’s Soviet archives are opening up – and changing memory politics

OpenDemocracy: Ukraine’s Soviet archives are opening up – and changing memory politics. “With new laws opening up access to state security archives, Ukrainian citizens are discovering what really happened to their family members under Stalin.”

CNN: Smithsonian interested in obtaining migrant children’s drawings depicting their time in US custody

CNN: Smithsonian interested in obtaining migrant children’s drawings depicting their time in US custody. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has inquired about obtaining disturbing drawings by migrant children that depict figures with sad faces behind bars.”

SILive: Advance/SILive. com launches website featuring Holocaust survivor stories

SILive: Advance/SILive. com launches website featuring Holocaust survivor stories. “Today, the Advance/SILive.com proudly introduces our readers to a new website that has been nearly two years in the making. That’s how long multimedia specialist Shira Stoll has been working on a project to document the stories of Staten Island’s remaining Holocaust survivors.”

Arolsen Archives: More than 13 million documents online

Arolsen Archives: More than 13 million documents online. “The database contains a comprehensive collection of documents from concentration camps, including prisoner cards and death notices. The more than 13 million documents featuring information on over 2.2 million people persecuted by the Nazi Regime are part of the UNESCO’s World Documentary Heritage and are a key focus of the collection of the Arolsen Archives. This database is the first of several large collections scheduled to go online in future.”

The Atlantic: Tech Companies Are Deleting Evidence of War Crimes

The Atlantic: Tech Companies Are Deleting Evidence of War Crimes. “…some of what governments ask tech companies to do, such as suppressing violent content, cuts against other legitimate goals, such as bringing warlords and dictators to justice. Balancing these priorities is hard enough when humans are making judgments in accordance with established legal norms. In contrast, tech giants operate largely in the dark.”