News@Northeastern: Can We Better Understand Online Behavior? These Researchers Will Dig Deep To Find Out.

News@Northeastern: Can We Better Understand Online Behavior? These Researchers Will Dig Deep To Find Out. . “Researchers at Northeastern University were awarded a $15.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation to build a research infrastructure that will provide scientists around the world and across disciplines with open, ethical, analytic information about how people behave online.”

University of Texas at Dallas: Team’s Online Project Aims To Expand Scope of Psychology Research

University of Texas at Dallas: Team’s Online Project Aims To Expand Scope of Psychology Research. “Dr. Candice Mills, associate professor of psychology in The University of Texas at Dallas’ School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, has received a three-year, $1.25 million grant from the NSF to develop an online platform for research on cognitive development in children ages 3 to 6. The result will be a website that will offer fun research activities for families and will help scientists understand child development on a larger scale than ever before.”

University of Washington: Do Alexa and Siri make kids bossier? New research suggests you might not need to worry

University of Washington: Do Alexa and Siri make kids bossier? New research suggests you might not need to worry. “Chatting with a robot is now part of many families’ daily lives, thanks to conversational agents such as Apple’s Siri or Amazon’s Alexa. Recent research has shown that children are often delighted to find that they can ask Alexa to play their favorite songs or call Grandma. But does hanging out with Alexa or Siri affect the way children communicate with their fellow humans? Probably not, according to a recent study led by the University of Washington that found that children are sensitive to context when it comes to these conversations.”

ScienceNordic: What our online lives can tell us about how much we value nature

ScienceNordic: What our online lives can tell us about how much we value nature. “For the past eight years, several research groups, including ours, have spent a lot of time understanding whether we can eavesdrop on social media posts to figure out where and when people interact with nature. It turns out that we can. We tend to take photos and describe the part of our nature experiences that mattered. So suddenly our online lives is opening the possibility to figure out, at a global scale, where people go to experience nature and what it is they are actually enjoying when doing so.”

ABC News: As flood alerts lit up phones, did ‘warning fatigue’ set in?

ABC News: As flood alerts lit up phones, did ‘warning fatigue’ set in?. “Experts call it ‘warning fatigue,’ and no one can be sure what role it might have played in a tragedy that killed scores of people across the Northeast, including more than two dozen in New Jersey and at least 11 in New York City — many drowning in their basement apartments or in cars trapped in submerged roadways. The weather service acknowledged that in the past, alerts were being pushed out too often. There’s been lots of handwringing over how to get more people to heed warnings.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Algorithm Revolutionizes How Scientists Study Behavior

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Algorithm Revolutionizes How Scientists Study Behavior. “As a behavioral neuroscientist, Yttri studies what happens in the brain when animals walk, eat, sniff or do any action. This kind of research could help answer questions about neurological diseases or disorders like Parkinson’s disease or stroke. But identifying and predicting animal behavior is extremely difficult. Now, a new unsupervised machine learning algorithm developed by [Professor Eric] Yttri and Alex Hsu, a biological sciences Ph.D. candidate in his lab, makes studying behavior much easier and more accurate.”

NPR: When COVID Deaths Are Dismissed Or Stigmatized, Grief Is Mixed With Shame And Anger

NPR: When COVID Deaths Are Dismissed Or Stigmatized, Grief Is Mixed With Shame And Anger . “Months after Kyle Dixon died, his old house in Lanse, Pennsylvania is still full of reminders of a life cut short. His tent and hiking boots sit on the porch where he last put them down. The grass that he used to mow has grown tall in his absence. And on the kitchen counter, there are still bottles of the over-the-counter cough medicine he took to try to ease his symptoms at home, as COVID-19 began to destroy his lungs.”

Lesson from a robot swarm: Change group behavior by talking one-on-one rather than getting on a soapbox (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Lesson from a robot swarm: Change group behavior by talking one-on-one rather than getting on a soapbox. “Our robot swarm study looked at how opinions spread in large populations. We found that a population of uninformed individuals can cling to outdated beliefs and fail to adopt better available alternatives when information about the new options spreads to everyone all at once. Instead, when individuals only share the information one by one, the population can better adapt to changes and reach an agreement in favor of the best option.”

PsyPost: Study finds coronavirus-related polarization is stronger among people higher in cognitive ability

PsyPost: Study finds coronavirus-related polarization is stronger among people higher in cognitive ability. “New psychology research indicates that cognitive ability exacerbates political polarization in responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. The study, published in Intelligence, found that people with greater verbal ability tended to have more polarized responses, which may be related to their selective consumption of partisan media.”

PsyPost: COVID-19 rule breakers characterized by extraversion, amorality and uninformed information-gathering strategies

PsyPost: COVID-19 rule breakers characterized by extraversion, amorality and uninformed information-gathering strategies. “Scientists have uncovered a cluster of psychological characteristics associated with people who refuse to comply with COVID-19 safety regulations. Their new findings, published in the journal PLOS One, shed light on the individual factors and attitudes underlying deviant behavior during the pandemic.”

Newswise: Grief and Loss for cancer patients in the Era of COVID

Newswise: Grief and Loss for cancer patients in the Era of COVID . “The COVID-19 pandemic has brought a time period of grief in many forms, even grief unrelated to the loss of life – some caused by the need for isolation measures to slow the spread of the virus. You might grieve for people who have caught the virus, grieve your loss of routine and grieve the loss of feelings of safety and security in the world. As a cancer patient, you may feel grief about not having loved ones present for treatment.”