Phys .org: Surveys reveal significant shifts in consumer behavior during pandemic

Phys .org: Surveys reveal significant shifts in consumer behavior during pandemic. “The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly altered how people shop, how much they buy, the trips they take outside their homes, and the number of tele-activities—like work, medicine and education—that have become commonplace. These changes were rapid and have tremendously impacted the economy, supply chains, and the environment.”

Purdue University: How have people responded to COVID-19 restrictions around the world?

Purdue University: How have people responded to COVID-19 restrictions around the world?. “Public camera footage of how people have responded so far to COVID-19 social distancing guidelines in spaces such as tourist spots and busy street corners could help inform new policies as the pandemic progresses. But that footage is scattered all over the internet. Purdue University engineers built a website that pools together live footage and images from approximately 30,000 network cameras in more than 100 countries, making data easier to analyze.”

Counseling Connoisseur: Death and bereavement during COVID-19 (Counseling Today)

Counseling Today: Counseling Connoisseur: Death and bereavement during COVID-19. “The novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 has changed the way we do many things in our daily lives. The need for social distancing has resulted in virtual meetings replacing physical gatherings. Zoom conferencing can be awkward, and online happy hour isn’t as satisfying as hanging out with friends at your neighborhood bar. But, the loss of one particular kind of in-person gathering has been completely devastating: shared mourning rituals.”

Vox: Quarantine has changed us — and it’s not all bad

Vox: Quarantine has changed us — and it’s not all bad. “Although being on lockdown has been pretty grueling on balance, the surprise is that many of us have realized there are some things about quarantine life that are worth preserving. We’re questioning the very fundamentals of the ‘normal’ we’d all come to unthinkingly accept — and realizing we don’t want to go back, not to that.”

PsyPost: Psychopathic traits linked to non-compliance with social distancing guidelines amid the coronavirus pandemic

PsyPost: Psychopathic traits linked to non-compliance with social distancing guidelines amid the coronavirus pandemic. “New research provides some initial evidence that certain antagonistic personality traits are associated with ignoring preventative measures meant to halt the spread of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The study has been peer reviewed and accepted for publication in the journal Social Psychology and Personality Science. It is currently available on the PsyArXiv preprint website.”

Phys .org: Nudging out the coronavirus with behavioral economics

Phys .org: Nudging out the coronavirus with behavioral economics. “Human behavior is key in any pandemic. So how can a little nudge in the right direction change our behavior for the better? Researcher Nurit Nobel explains the science behind encouraging good behaviors—and how it can help us during the pandemic.”

Arizona State University: New study reveals how COVID-19 is shifting our public, private behaviors

Arizona State University: New study reveals how COVID-19 is shifting our public, private behaviors. “Whether or not you wear a face mask in public probably has a lot to do with your political affiliation. And if you’re wearing a mask to show consideration to others, your motivation is likely related to your race. Those were just a few of the findings in a recent study partially sponsored by Arizona State University that looked at how Americans are behaving during the COVID-19 pandemic. Edward D. Vargas, an assistant professor with ASU’s School of Transborder Studies, was a principal investigator on a seven-member interdisciplinary team that pooled its research funds together to start the National Panel Study of COVID-19.”

Washington Post: Masks are changing the way we look at each other, and ourselves

Washington Post: Masks are changing the way we look at each other, and ourselves. “Melina Basnight looks into the camera and applies two shades of eyeshadow: a periwinkle blue, and a bright, bold ochre. It’s like any other tutorial on her YouTube channel, Makeup Menaree, except that it’s based on a new premise: that all points south of the eyes will be eclipsed by a mask.”

Pandemic research: Economics project to explore impact of biases on social distancing (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Pandemic research: Economics project to explore impact of biases on social distancing. “With neither a vaccine nor a proven treatment available, many communities are relying on social distancing to battle the coronavirus pandemic, from closing non-essential businesses to wearing masks in public. The problem: Not everyone agrees to follow these measures, seen by recent protests across the country. A team of economists at Binghamton University, State University of New York is studying the phenomenon for a new research project on ‘The Role of Intertemporal Biases in Influencing Individual’s Demand for Social Distancing.'”

NBC News: Coronavirus conspiracy theorists have now revealed themselves. What can the rest of us do?

NBC News: Coronavirus conspiracy theorists have now revealed themselves. What can the rest of us do? . “I’ve been a psychologist for 25 years and, though it was an initially challenging concept for me to accept, I do know that some people are incapable of change. On a personal level, this lesson was admittedly difficult for me to absorb but, once I did, it allowed me to accept certain people in my life, and to accept them and their decisions for who and what they are. In the age of COVID-19, I find that I am not so accepting. Political and personal decisions feel like they have life-and-death consequences. Misinformation skewed toward a political view may cause people to disregard social distancing or to take dangerous or unproven medication. And it’s affecting the people I love the most.”

‘Rooted in fear’: Two science historians discuss the historical association of disease, shame, and social stigma. (Penn Today)

Penn Today: ‘Rooted in fear’: Two science historians discuss the historical association of disease, shame, and social stigma.. “One of the early cases of COVID-19 spread within the United States happened at a glamorous birthday party in Westport, Connecticut. The event included dinner and dancing with guests that flew in for the occasion, including a man from Johannesburg, South Africa, who developed symptoms on the flight home. Yet the party host would not disclose the guest list to public health officials for contact tracing. Shame and social stigma, says David Barnes, associate professor in the History and Sociology of Science Department, ‘is a huge issue in public health.'”

Phys .org: Researchers offer ways to address life under COVID-19

Phys .org: Researchers offer ways to address life under COVID-19. “An international team of researchers has outlined ways to manage different facets of life under the spread of the COVID-19 virus, ranging from how we can combat racially driven bias and fake news to how we can increase cooperation and better manage stress. Its work, which appears in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, considers research stretching over the past half century to offer insights about how to address current circumstances.”

Caltech: Forming New Habits in the Era of the Coronavirus

Caltech: Forming New Habits in the Era of the Coronavirus. “With the coronavirus pandemic upon us, people are readily forming new habits, such as washing their hands more frequently and communicating with colleagues over video platforms like Zoom. Which of these habits will stick when the pandemic is over and which will pass? Colin Camerer, the Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Economics and the T&C Chen Center for Social and Decision Neuroscience Leadership Chair in the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech, is looking into this question of habit formation, or what scientists call habitization. He says that the coronavirus pandemic may have ripple effects that lead to lasting behavioral changes in the arenas of public health, education, and more.”

Coronavirus: Why going without physical touch is so hard (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Why going without physical touch is so hard. “Milestone birthdays are being celebrated over video calls, elderly people are talking to neighbours through windows and those who live alone are going without any human touch at all, as they obey the government guidelines to stay at home and keep 2m (6ft) apart from others. But touch is ‘really fundamental’ for humans, says Prof Robin Dunbar, evolutionary psychologist at the University of Oxford – and going without it weakens our close relationships.”