ScienceBlog: Narcissists Love Being Pandemic Essential Workers

ScienceBlog: Narcissists Love Being Pandemic Essential Workers. “In a new study, researchers found that essential workers (including those in restaurants, grocery and retail stores) who scored higher on measures of narcissism shared more than others about their work. And this sharing on social media, in person and elsewhere increased their narcissistic feelings in the moment.” I hope this goes without saying, but let me just emphasize that not all essential workers are narcissists, obviously, and all essential workers are, well, essential, no matter what their narcissism score is, and I thank them!

Psychology Today: Cybersmiling, A Social Media Positive

Psychology Today: Cybersmiling, A Social Media Positive. “As is true of so many phenomena in our world, the effects of social media and the internet are mixed when it comes to the human experience. So, from the perspective of someone who’s been pretty vocal about the adverse effects of social media on the modern world, here are three points that speak to the bright side.”

The Matrix is already here: Social media promised to connect us, but left us isolated, scared and tribal (The Conversation)

The Conversation: The Matrix is already here: Social media promised to connect us, but left us isolated, scared and tribal. “I’m a psychiatrist who studies anxiety and stress, and I often write about how our politics and culture are mired in fear and tribalism. My co-author is a digital marketing expert who brings expertise to the technological-psychological aspect of this discussion. With the nation on edge, we believe it’s critical to look at how easily our society is being manipulated into tribalism in the age of social media. Even after the exhausting election cycle is over, the division persists, if not widening, and conspiracy theories continue to emerge, grow and divide on the social media.”

EurekAlert: Two motivational artificial beings are better than one for enhancing learning

EurekAlert: Two motivational artificial beings are better than one for enhancing learning. “Social rewards such as praise are known to enhance various stages of the learning process. Now, researchers from Japan have found that praise delivered by artificial beings such as robots and virtual graphics-based agents can have effects similar to praise delivered by humans, with important practical applications as social services such as education increasingly move to virtual and online platforms.”

ProPublica: How Your Brain Tricks You Into Taking Risks During the Pandemic

ProPublica: How Your Brain Tricks You Into Taking Risks During the Pandemic. “Many months into the pandemic, even as the nation faces its highest average daily case counts to date, people still don’t agree on how to live in the era of COVID-19. We know how to protect ourselves — washing our hands, wearing masks and staying socially distant — but many people still take unnecessary risks, even at the highest levels of government.”

Mashable: Tinder’s Ghosting Graveyard helps you craft a text to the person you ghosted

Mashable: Tinder’s Ghosting Graveyard helps you craft a text to the person you ghosted . “Sometimes people come into our lives at the wrong times and we realise too late that they were actually pretty great. So, how do you rekindle an old flame without being a complete and utter pandemic cliché? Tricky. Tinder has rustled up a tool called Ghosting Graveyard that might provide some assistance in sliding into the DMs of someone you once ghosted.”

Arizona State University: Using evolution to think about the pandemic suggests SARS-CoV-2 can affect social behaviors

Arizona State University: Using evolution to think about the pandemic suggests SARS-CoV-2 can affect social behaviors. “An ensemble of scientists, with expertise in psychology, biology, neuroscience and medicine, has authored a paper that uses an evolutionary perspective to interpret and assess the COVID-19 pandemic. The novel SARS-CoV-2 virus has infected more than 40 million people and killed more than 1 million worldwide. It has also severely impacted the global economy.”

The Conversation: We must make moral choices about how we relate to social media apps

The Conversation: We must make moral choices about how we relate to social media apps. “As an ethics professor, I’ve come to realise that we must make moral choices about how we relate to our technologies. This requires an honest evaluation of our needs and weaknesses, and a clear understanding of the intentions of these platforms.”

The Next Web: More than 50% of humans in the world use social media — here’s what you need to know

The Next Web: More than 50% of humans in the world use social media — here’s what you need to know . “More than 4 billion people around the world now use social media each month, and an average of nearly 2 million new users are joining them every day. The world is spending more time on social media too, with the typical user now spending roughly 15% of their waking life using social platforms.”

The Atlantic: America’s Toxic Love Affair With Technology

The Atlantic: America’s Toxic Love Affair With Technology. “America has long carried on a great love affair with technological progress. But the truth is that really big inventions—the printing press, the internal-combustion engine, the internet—have both upsides and downsides. They make new things possible, but they also tend to undo settled expectations and create chaos. The real question is not whether there will be major technological changes, but whether societies can learn to better handle the disruptions that follow.”

The Conversation: Do social media algorithms erode our ability to make decisions freely? The jury is out

The Conversation: Do social media algorithms erode our ability to make decisions freely? The jury is out . “Social media algorithms, artificial intelligence, and our own genetics are among the factors influencing us beyond our awareness. This raises an ancient question: do we have control over our own lives? This article is part of The Conversation’s series on the science of free will.”

Psychology Today: State-Sponsored Bullshit, and Why Truth Matters

Psychology Today: State-Sponsored Bullshit, and Why Truth Matters. “This important guest post had to be reviewed by the United States government before I could share it with you. That’s ironic, because the authors are challenging the government’s sweeping pre-publication review process in this article. That challenge is part of their broader examination of the normalization of bullshit in contemporary American politics and government, and how very dangerous that is.”

Washington Post: Some covid-19 rule-breakers could be narcissists, experts say. Here’s how to approach them.

Washington Post: Some covid-19 rule-breakers could be narcissists, experts say. Here’s how to approach them.. “This unwillingness to follow pandemic guidelines, despite the fact that health experts and scientific data support their efficacy, has become a widespread issue in the United States, and reflects its reputation as a society with higher levels of attitudes associated with narcissism, said Ramani Durvasula, a licensed clinical psychologist and professor at California State University at Los Angeles.”

EurekAlert: When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques

EurekAlert: When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques. “Recently computer scientists at USC Institute of Technologies (ICT) set out to assess under what conditions humans would employ deceptive negotiating tactics. Through a series of studies, they found that whether humans would embrace a range of deceptive and sneaky techniques was dependent both on the humans’ prior negotiating experience in negotiating as well as whether virtual agents where employed to negotiate on their behalf.”

Mashable: The practical guide to mid-pandemic sex, because abstinence isn’t cutting it

Mashable: The practical guide to mid-pandemic sex, because abstinence isn’t cutting it. “It is, of course, true that solo play or virtual sex are the safest routes right now, but for many that simply is not a realistic or sustainable solution. Telling sexual adults to not have sex at a time when we’re not only socially isolated but also increasingly anxious and depressed is only going to result in shame — and perhaps even drive people to engage in riskier behavior if they feel the need to be dishonest for fear of ‘being found out.'”