Motherboard: Widely Mocked Anti-Piracy Ads Made People Pirate More, Study Finds

Motherboard: Widely Mocked Anti-Piracy Ads Made People Pirate More, Study Finds. “An infamous anti-piracy ad from 2004 tried to convince us all that downloading a pirated movie is no different than stealing a car. We’ve all seen it, but according to a new study published in The Information Society, we were not convinced. In fact, the study found that by hugely overstating the negative impact of piracy, the ad may have caused people to pirate even more.”

The Conversation: Why it’s important to think about social media use as a form of dissociation, rather than addiction

The Conversation: Why it’s important to think about social media use as a form of dissociation, rather than addiction. “What if, instead of people becoming ‘addicted’ to social media – as users often characterize their excessive engagement – they’re actually dissociating, or becoming so engaged that they lose track of time? I’ve researched people’s social media use for four years as a Ph.D. student at the University of Washington, and my collaborators and I decided to design a study to test this theory.”

Boing Boing: The Ai Promise Collection allows users to submit a personal promise in the form of a photographed note

Boing Boing: The Ai Promise Collection allows users to submit a personal promise in the form of a photographed note. “The Ai Promise Collection allows users to submit a personal promise in the form of a photographed note. There are currently 60 promises which you can click and view, such as #29, which states ‘I will never forget my dream.’” When you see Ai, you may think AI, but I believe “Ai” in Japanese means love/affection, which is the reference here.

PsyPost: People attribute information they found online to their own memory instead of the internet

PsyPost: People attribute information they found online to their own memory instead of the internet. “Human cognition is now so intertwined with the internet, a knowledge-sharing system that can be accessed any time anywhere, that the boundaries between individual knowledge (i.e., personal memory) and collective knowledge (i.e., external online information) are becoming increasingly blurred. In other words, people may mistakenly believe that information they found online is from their personal memory.”

The Conversation: Why are so many big tech whistleblowers women? Here is what the research shows

The Conversation: Why are so many big tech whistleblowers women? Here is what the research shows. “There is data showing that women, more so than men, are associated with lower levels of corruption in government and business. For example, studies show that the higher the share of female elected officials in governments around the world, the lower the corruption. While this trend in part reflects the tendency of less corrupt governments to more often elect women, additional studies show a direct causal effect of electing female leaders and, in turn, reducing corruption.”

New York Times: We Know Less About Social Media Than We Think

New Yorker: We Know Less About Social Media Than We Think. “In April, the social psychologist Jonathan Haidt published an essay in The Atlantic in which he sought to explain, as the piece’s title had it, ‘Why the Past 10 Years of American Life Have Been Uniquely Stupid.’ Anyone familiar with Haidt’s work in the past half decade could have anticipated his answer: social media. Although Haidt concedes that political polarization and factional enmity long predate the rise of the platforms, and that there are plenty of other factors involved, he believes that the tools of virality—Facebook’s Like and Share buttons, Twitter’s Retweet function—have algorithmically and irrevocably corroded public life.”

‘I don’t even remember what I read’: People enter a ‘dissociative state’ when using social media (University of Washington)

University of Washington: ‘I don’t even remember what I read’: People enter a ‘dissociative state’ when using social media. “Researchers at the University of Washington wondered if people enter a similar state of dissociation when surfing social media, and if that explains why users might feel out of control after spending so much time on their favorite app.”

Phys .org: In-person socialization down, but social media isn’t to blame, researcher says

Phys .org: In-person socialization down, but social media isn’t to blame, researcher says. “In the United States, Great Britain and Australia, there has been a steady, uniform decline in [Face to Face] time that began well before the rise of social media. This new analysis shows the decline continued through the stay-at-home orders and social distancing of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Outage outrage: Facebook outage may reveal depth of social media dependency (PennState)

PennState: Outage outrage: Facebook outage may reveal depth of social media dependency. “In a study of user reactions to a six-hour Facebook outage in the fall of 2021, the researchers said that members of the site flooded rival Twitter with nearly a quarter million tweets about the outage, quickly making #facebookdown a top trending topic. While many comments reflected anger about the situation and others ridiculed Facebook, users also expressed a need to find other social media outlets, according to S. Shyam Sundar, James P. Jimirro Professor of Media Effects in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications and co-director of the Media Effects Research Laboratory at Penn State.”

Science Has Spoken: Tell the Truth on Facebook or Risk Your Reputation (University of Houston)

University of Houston: Science Has Spoken: Tell the Truth on Facebook or Risk Your Reputation . “Online social networks (OSN) like Facebook and Twitter have created a space for people to easily express their opinions, which can encourage open dialogue and stimulate plenty of disagreements. Research now reveals that just like in face-to-face relationships, intellectually humble behavior, like admitting when you are wrong, leads to better impression formation online.”