New York Times: The iPhone at the Deathbed

New York Times: The iPhone at the Deathbed. “In a collision of technology and culture, of new habits and very old ones, we are beginning to photograph our dead again. For families like Mr. [Robert] Alexander’s who are choosing home funerals and following natural death practices — D.I.Y. affairs that eschew the services of conventional funeral parlors — photography is an extension and celebration of that choice.”

The Next Web: AI will never replace good old human creativity

The Next Web: AI will never replace good old human creativity. “The European Patent Office recently turned down an application for a patent that described a food container. This was not because the invention was not novel or useful, but because it was created by artificial intelligence (AI). By law, inventors need to be actual people. This isn’t the first invention by AI – machines have produced innovations ranging from scientific papers and books to new materials and music. That said, being creative is clearly one of the most remarkable human traits. Without it, there would be no poetry, no internet, and no space travel. But could AI ever match or even surpass us? Let’s have a look at the research.”

The Conversation: Why people post ‘couple photos’ as their social media profile pictures

The Conversation: Why people post ‘couple photos’ as their social media profile pictures. “We are social psychology researchers interested in understanding people’s behavior in close relationships and on social media. Our research and that of other scholars provides insight into why people use these types of ‘I’m part of a couple!’ displays on social media. Choosing profile photos that include their romantic partner, posting their relationship status and mentioning their partner in their updates can all be signs of how people feel in their relationship – and may send an important message to potential rivals.”

The fact-checker’s dilemma: Humans are hardwired to dismiss facts that don’t fit their worldview (NiemanLab)

NiemanLab: The fact-checker’s dilemma: Humans are hardwired to dismiss facts that don’t fit their worldview. “Motivated reasoning is what social scientists call the process of deciding what evidence to accept based on the conclusion one prefers. As I explain in my book The Truth About Denial: Bias and Self-Deception in Science, Politics, and Religion, this very human tendency applies to all kinds of facts about the physical world, economic history and current events.”

New York Times: We’re All in the Bathroom Filming Ourselves

New York Times: We’re All in the Bathroom Filming Ourselves. Not this old woman. “Most home bathrooms are well lit and have nice, bright acoustics. Unlike the kitchen, living room or even bedroom, bathrooms are private spaces, where parents and siblings are trained to not barge in. It’s almost inevitable that they would become the perfect stage set for the dramatic entrances, exits, skits, dances and story times of TikTok, the short-form social video app that has grown wildly popular in the last year.”

JSTOR: Is Jane Austen the Antidote to Social Media Overload?

JSTOR: Is Jane Austen the Antidote to Social Media Overload?. “I soon got past the incongruity of finding Jane Austen on my phone, in my audiobook app, and in the ebook I downloaded so that I’d have access to explanatory annotations on the text. (Yes, I’m afraid I really have fallen down the Austen rabbit hole this time.) Indeed, as I plunged into Austen’s England from the very device that normally connects me to Facebook and Twitter, her world and ours looked more and more alike.”

New York Times: This Is the Guy Who’s Taking Away the Likes

New York Times: This Is the Guy Who’s Taking Away the Likes. “Likes are the social media currency undergirding an entire influencer economy, inspiring a million Kardashian wannabes and giving many of us regular people daily endorphin hits. But lately, Mr. [Adam] Mosseri has been concerned about the unanticipated consequences of Instagram as approval arbiter.”