Psychology Today: FOMO and Social Media

Psychology Today: FOMO and Social Media. “One concept that has been linked to problematic social media use is FOMO, or ‘fear of missing out.’ FOMO describes the nagging feeling that other people may be experiencing something fun and awesome but that you are missing out on it. It is easy to see why experiencing FOMO has been linked to interest in social media: If someone is afraid that their friends are doing all of these awesome activities without including them, constantly checking their social media feeds to see what they are up to could make sense from this person’s perspective.”

Arguing on the internet: UW researchers studying how to make online arguments productive (University of Washington)

University of Washington: Arguing on the internet: UW researchers studying how to make online arguments productive. “The internet seems like the place to go to get into fights. Whether they’re with a family member or a complete stranger, these arguments have the potential to destroy important relationships and consume a lot of emotional energy. Researchers at the University of Washington worked with almost 260 people to understand these disagreements and to develop potential design interventions that could make these discussions more productive and centered around relationship-building.”

PsyPost: Five minutes of exposure to fake news can unconsciously alter a person’s behavior, study finds

PsyPost: Five minutes of exposure to fake news can unconsciously alter a person’s behavior, study finds. “A study published in Computers in Human Behavior suggests that brief exposure to online misinformation can unknowingly alter a person’s behavior. The experiment found that reading a fake news article slightly altered participants’ unconscious behavior, as evidenced by a change in their performances on a test called the Finger Tapping Test.”

The Conversation: Social media ‘likes’ change the way we feel about our memories – new research

The Conversation: Social media ‘likes’ change the way we feel about our memories – new research. “Memories are often considered very personal and private. Yet, in the past few years, people have got used to notifications from social media or phone galleries telling them they have a ‘memory’. These repackaged versions of the past affect not just what we remember but also the attachments we have with those memories. In a new study, we found social media has the potential to change how people feel about their memories.”

The Cut: An Interview With the Man Who Keeps Uploading My Feet to WikiFeet

The Cut: An Interview With the Man Who Keeps Uploading My Feet to WikiFeet. “To be clear, I am not a celebrity. I have decent Twitter following from having reported on politics for over a decade, from tweeting jokes about politics and appearing on cable news sometimes. But I was pretty shocked to be looking at my own wikiFeet profile, which included my full name, birthday, and photos of me and my exposed feet, dating back to a family vacation in 2013. The images seemed to have been lifted from my Instagram page, which I keep public because I share my work and media appearances there sometimes. My feet had a very sad 3.5 out of 5 stars rating, which categorized them as ‘okay.’”

PsyPost: Watching Anthony Fauci on Fox News makes people more willing to engage in pandemic reducing behaviors, study finds

PsyPost: Watching Anthony Fauci on Fox News makes people more willing to engage in pandemic reducing behaviors, study finds. “How warmly or coldly people feel toward scientists is associated with their compliance with measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, according to new research published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. The study also found evidence that medical experts such as Anthony Fauci can help motivate people to maintain social distance from others and use disinfectant products amid the pandemic.”

Daily Beast: Sex Parties Are Back. Vaccines Are Optional.

Daily Beast: Sex Parties Are Back. Vaccines Are Optional. “Welcome aboard the Cancun Boobs Cruise, an adults-only party where nudity is encouraged and topless women dance to club remixes. It’s not a sex party exactly, though some swingers do attend to meet like-minded couples. As the catamaran cuts through the crystal blue waters of the Caribbean Sea, people are ready to forget about the pandemic for a few hours. Guests aren’t required to wear masks (but staff do), which makes it easy to relax and unwind. But then, one moment brings everyone back to reality: the daily clap for essential workers who are vacationing on board. Consider it the X-rated version of New York City’s famous 7 p.m. applause.”

PsyPost: People with greater intellectual humility show greater scrutiny toward “fake news” about the coronavirus

PsyPost: People with greater intellectual humility show greater scrutiny toward “fake news” about the coronavirus. “New research published in Social Psychological and Personality Science suggests that intellectual humility is a trait that may protect against misinformation in the media or ‘fake news.’ A series of studies found that people with greater intellectual humility were consistently more inclined to investigate fake claims about COVID-19.”

Newswise: Health ads in users’ customized online sites may evoke negative reactions

Newswise: Health ads in users’ customized online sites may evoke negative reactions. “In a study, the researchers found that people who gained a feeling of control when they customized an online website were more likely to perceive the health message as a threat to their freedom, lowering the chance that they will adopt the message’s advice. On the other hand, when customization bolstered the users’ sense of identity, they did not resent the message as much and were more willing to consider the ads’ recommended behavioral changes, according to the researchers.”

PsyPost: Trait victimhood and mental rigidity linked to heightened fear of COVID-19 and greater adherence to safety measures

PsyPost: Trait victimhood and mental rigidity linked to heightened fear of COVID-19 and greater adherence to safety measures. “According to new research, the fear and uncertainty characterizing the coronavirus pandemic may lead certain personalities to be more likely to follow safety guidelines. The study, published in Frontiers in Psychology, found that the tendency to feel like a victim and an inclination toward mental rigidity were both associated with greater adherence to safety measures.”

Mashable: How a year of living online has changed us

Mashable: How a year of living online has changed us. “As work, school, and social interactions migrated online once COVID-19 became a global pandemic last March, the average monthly household data use in 2020 skyrocketed by 40 percent compared to the prior year, according to OpenVault, a global provider of broadband industry analytics. That figure includes tablet, computer, gaming console, and mobile phone data that uses a household’s broadband internet connection, but doesn’t reflect when someone accesses the internet through their cellular data. The average household now uses nearly a half a terabyte of data each month.”

PsyPost: The memes we read might influence how we love, study finds

PsyPost: The memes we read might influence how we love, study finds. “The prevalence and importance of social media has made the sharing of internet memes a primary method of communicating ideas today. Short and punchy, memes are pervasive and often emotionally salient, making them prime candidates for influencers of human behavior. This observation led a team of researchers to explore the influence of romantic memes on relationship beliefs. Their research is published in Psychological Studies.”

PsyPost: Psychological entitlement linked to defiance of COVID-19 rules via perceptions of unfairness, study finds

PsyPost: Psychological entitlement linked to defiance of COVID-19 rules via perceptions of unfairness, study finds. “People with a heightened sense of entitlement are more likely to believe that measures intended to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are unfair, which in turn is associated with reduced compliance with such measures, according to new research from China. The findings are set to appear in the scientific journal Personality and Individual Differences.”

PsyPost: Intellectually arrogant people are less willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, study finds

PsyPost: Intellectually arrogant people are less willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, study finds. “Those who are hostile to revising their beliefs in the face of new information are more likely to hold anti-vaccination sentiments and are less willing to be vaccinated for COVID-19, according to a new study published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. The findings provide more evidence of a link between intellectual humility and vaccination attitudes.”