University of Texas at Austin: Dylan Thomas Digital Collection Launched Online

University of Texas at Austin: Dylan Thomas Digital Collection Launched Online. “Collections related to Dylan Thomas are held by multiple institutions internationally, and the Ransom Center holds the world’s largest collection, which includes manuscripts, letters, notebooks, drawings and photographs that trace the origins of his major works and the evolution of a young writer. The collection also features screenplays, radio broadcasts and radio plays. Most were acquired by the Center between 1960 and 2004. More than 6,000 items are now digitized, representing only a portion of the author’s physical archive.”

National Humanities Center: A virtual conference exploring the critical intersection between the humanities and artificial intelligence.

National Humanities Center: A virtual conference exploring the critical intersection between the humanities and artificial intelligence.. “Join us for a series of virtual events—presentations, conversations, webinars, film screenings, and an art exhibition—highlighting perspectives from leading humanists, scientists, engineers, artists, writers, and software company executives collectively advancing inquiry into key emerging questions…. Thanks to generous support from our sponsors, this conference is offered free of charge. However, registration is required to access conference sessions, view films, and explore the online art exhibit.” The conference takes place April 7-22.

Humanities Kansas: Humanities Hotline

Interesting. From Humanities Kansas: Humanities Hotline. “The toll-free Humanities Hotline delivers interesting short stories anytime, day or night. It’s simple: Dial 1-888-416-2018 and choose from a menu of humanities highlights. These bite-sized micropresentations cover Kansas stories – both serious and light-hearted – and are researched and presented by experts across the state.

University of Southern California: USC Dornsife’s Department of English launches USC’s new international literary journal

University of Southern California: USC Dornsife’s Department of English launches USC’s new international literary journal. “In Lawrence Weschler’s 1998 New Yorker essay ‘L.A. Glows,’ a climate scientist uses the word ‘airlight’ to describe why Southern California light is sometimes crisp and clear, so everything can be seen with clarity, and sometimes the light is diffused and hazy, so everything seems obfuscated. From this comes the inspiration for the name of USC’s new international literary journal, Air/Light, published by the Department of English at USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.”

University of Texas at Austin: Humanity and Google Sheets

University of Texas at Austin: Humanity and Google Sheets. “When one of Professor Julie Hardwick’s students recently got an internship at a local tech company, she was asked to compare the company’s benefits package with those of 60 competitors. Initially overwhelmed, she then thought, ‘I’m going to get my Google Sheet, get my evidence, look for patterns, get my data visualization, and then present an interpretation.’ This spreadsheet-based approach might seem like the plan of a good business student, but in fact, she was harkening to a different class. “

UNC Greensboro: Digital Humanities Project Receives $325,000 NEH Grant

UNC Greensboro: Digital Humanities Project Receives $325,000 NEH Grant. “The funding will be used to further develop MassMine, an interdisciplinary tool that supports the collection of data from digital networks. Beveridge, assistant professor of digital rhetoric in the Dept. of English, and his colleague Dr. Nicholas Van Horn, assistant professor at Capital University, created the software in 2014 to address accessibility issues for researching social networks in the humanities.”

Ars Technica: Machine learning can offer new tools, fresh insights for the humanities

Ars Technica: Machine learning can offer new tools, fresh insights for the humanities. “Truly revolutionary political transformations are naturally of great interest to historians, and the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century is widely regarded as one of the most influential, serving as a model for building other European democracies. A paper published last summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offers new insight into how the members of the first National Constituent Assembly hammered out the details of this new type of governance.”

Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR (JSTOR)

JSTOR: Understanding Great Works: a new research tool on JSTOR. “Understanding Great Works (Beta) is a free research tool from JSTOR Labs that fosters student engagement with classic literature by connecting passages in primary texts with journal articles and book chapters on JSTOR that cite those lines. Building on the success of the Understanding Shakespeare tool, Understanding Great Works encompasses several key works of British literature such as Frankenstein and Pride and Prejudice, the King James Bible, as well as all Shakespeare sonnets and plays.”

Emory University: Locate Samuel Beckett letters online in over 25 American literary archives

Emory University: Locate Samuel Beckett letters online in over 25 American literary archives. “Emory University announces the debut of The Location Register of the Letters of Samuel Beckett in American Public Archives, an open-access website listing the archival descriptions and locations of the letters of the Irish Nobel laureate Samuel Beckett. Users can browse the Location Register by recipient, physical description, sender and recipient addresses, language, repository, collection and previous publication.”

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook. “At Yale, in the newly reopened Digital Humanities Lab (DHLab), [Christophe] Schuwey will work on one of his latest projects, which involves digitizing the printed books of written portraits that circulated amongst French elites and high bourgeoisie in the 1600s — which, he said, functioned pretty much like Facebook does today. Schuwey will use 21st-century computing technology to relink these 17th-century social networks, giving modern scholars like himself new access to this lost ‘virtual world’ of fluctuating social hierarchy and markets of individual reputation in 1600s France.”

EurekAlert: New open access database for medieval literature

EurekAlert: New open access database for medieval literature . “Norse World is a new database which will make it easier for researchers to study perceptions of the surrounding world in Medieval Scandinavian literature. The new tool is a digital resource aimed at researchers in fields such as language history and philology, comparative literature, manuscript studies and digital humanities. It will be freely available to both researchers and the public.”

Scientific Data: An open database of productivity in Vietnam’s social sciences and humanities for public use

Scientific Data: An open database of productivity in Vietnam’s social sciences and humanities for public use. “This study presents a description of an open database on scientific output of Vietnamese researchers in social sciences and humanities, one that corrects for the shortcomings in current research publication databases such as data duplication, slow update, and a substantial cost of doing science. Here, using scientists’ self-reports, open online sources and cross-checking with Scopus database, we introduce a manual system and its semi-automated version of the database on the profiles of 657 Vietnamese researchers in social sciences and humanities who have published in Scopus-indexed journals from 2008 to 2018.”

The Turnbull Library Record: Past and Future (National Library of New Zealand)

National Library of New Zealand: The Turnbull Library Record: Past and Future. “Unscrupulous scholars, courtship and marriage in colonial New Zealand, women photographers, pirates, Joan of Arc, a 17th-century Persian manuscript, Earp’s bee library, the library and the cosmos – the intriguing and wide-ranging scope of articles in the Turnbull Library Record (TLR) reflects the richness of the Turnbull collections. I’ve been involved with the TLR for 10 years; eight of those as Managing Editor. It has been a real privilege to have helped bring each issue into the light of day, to work with contributors and designers to help shape its content and aesthetic impact – the stratospheric improvement of the latter having been a bar raised by its previous editor, Peter Ireland. It has also been a privilege to have been involved with the journal at this exciting time in the trajectory of its history – the moment […]

British Library: Seeking researchers to work on an ambitious data science and digital humanities project

British Library: Seeking researchers to work on an ambitious data science and digital humanities project. “In its early stages of development, the project, called Living with Machines, brings together national-scale digital collections and data, advanced data science techniques, and fundamental humanities questions. It will look at the social and cultural impact of mechanisation across the long nineteenth century, using data science methods both to track the application of technology to our social and economic lives and the human response to their introduction. The project will initially work with digitised newspaper collections, but will look to include a variety of sources and formats held by the British Library and other institutions.”