The Project Comedy Club Database

Another one of those things I stumbled across thanks to the Bing News RSS feed: The Project Comedy Club database. From the About page: “Project CCDB came to fruition when a few comedians in a text feed were complaining about the lack of women/POC diversity in nationwide comedy club line-ups, even in large markets like Los Angeles, where the population contains more than enough qualified (audience-drawing) comics for booking. After months of exchanging photos of predominantly white male lineups, these comics got sick of complaining about it and connected with an interested computer scientist to gather actual data from clubs over a three month period and see if the hearsay was true or just rumors of a resentful messaging group. So, here are the facts as they stand of what genders and ethnicitites are most represented.”

CNET: Memes could be our secret weapon against pesky bots

CNET: Memes could be our secret weapon against pesky bots. “Researchers from the University of Delaware published a study online last month suggesting memes can be effectively used to tell humans and bots apart. They propose memes could be ‘one of the strongest techniques to distinguish between a human and a bot based on conscience and interpretation.'”

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief

Ohio State News: Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief. “Researchers at The Ohio State University found that flagging inaccurate political posts because they had been disputed by fact-checkers or fellow Facebook users was not as good at reducing belief in the falsehoods or stopping people from sharing them.However, labeling inaccurate posts as being humor, parody or a hoax did reduce Facebook users’ belief in the falsehoods and resulted in significantly less willingness to share the posts.”

The Guardian: Meet the millennials pretending to be baby boomers on Facebook

The Guardian: Meet the millennials pretending to be baby boomers on Facebook. “Posting typos and non sequiturs is harmless, revealing a user’s unfamiliarity with the conversational conventions of social media, and perhaps an inexpert command of keyboards. Yet, as indicated by the skyrocketing popularity of a new Facebook group called ‘A group where we all pretend to be boomers,’ in which members of Generations X through Z adopt boomer-ish affectations for fun, they can also be amusing.” Oh sure, it’s fun now. Just wait, millennials, in 30 years you’ll be constantly plugging in your VR sockets upside down and Generation Mutant will post looping XR videos all over your house of you doing it. And don’t come crying to me when that happens.

Baby Elon Musk, rapping Kim Kardashian: Welcome to the world of silly deepfakes (CNN)

CNN: Baby Elon Musk, rapping Kim Kardashian: Welcome to the world of silly deepfakes. “By day, Paul Shales is a computer programmer who works in advertising operations for a bank. By night, he’s creating videos that show Elon Musk as a creepy looking, giggly baby; President Donald Trump as a temperamental pageant contestant on ‘Toddlers & Tiaras;’ and Kim Kardashian freestyle rapping.”

This Cat is Chonky: The fat-cat online shrine lifting humans from despair (CNET)

CNET: This Cat is Chonky: The fat-cat online shrine lifting humans from despair. “I’m standing at my desk working. Archer, a 10-pound bundle of sass and midnight fur, sits behind me on a stool, a single claw plunging repeatedly into the elbow of my sweater: ‘Pay attention to me!’ Archer knows I’m looking at other cats. He just knows.”

Mashable: Welcome to ‘Deep Bookstagram,’ where dark, book-based comedy thrives

Mashable: Welcome to ‘Deep Bookstagram,’ where dark, book-based comedy thrives . “Instagram has always been a safe haven for book lovers, a place where people can show off their private libraries full of white oak bookshelves, novels organized by color, aloe plants, and inspirational coffee mugs. But there’s a deeper, stranger, and far murkier part of book Instagram, known colloquially as ‘Bookstagram.'”