Hacks and roasts: Inside the new social media currency (Vogue Business)

Vogue Business: Hacks and roasts: Inside the new social media currency. “Hacks, where TikTok users share tips and tricks for efficiency or creativity; and roasts, a form of insult comedy in which someone is mocked, usually playfully, are thriving on the app and going viral. Brands are finding themselves involved in both — whether they like it or not. While some luxury and fashion labels might prefer to keep a distance, not least to maintain a well-protected aspirational status, others are eagerly jumping in, dishing their own comedic responses and launching collaborations with unexpected partners.”

Slate: What if a Peasant From the Middle Ages Got a Fancy Influencer Account? I Have Good News for You.

Slate: What if a Peasant From the Middle Ages Got a Fancy Influencer Account? I Have Good News for You.. “What would it be like if, in the Middle Ages, there was a peasant who made influencer-style videos about feast days, Lent, the bones of saints, and his coping mechanism for surviving the plague (buying hats)? Well, he exists on TikTok as @greedypeasant, the quarantine creation of costume designer Tyler Gunther, and he is delightful.”

BuzzFeed News: Kids Yell “Poop” At Alexa, And These Musicians Profit

BuzzFeed News: Kids Yell “Poop” At Alexa, And These Musicians Profit. “It’s not surprising that there are songs about the most basic of human functions — what is the point of art if not to unite us through shared feeling? But connecting these songs with their ideal audience (children who can’t yet spell) took a technological leap: voice-enabled smart speakers like Alexa.”

Funny Business: TikTok Is Putting a New Spin on Standup Comedy (CNET)

CNET: Funny Business: TikTok Is Putting a New Spin on Standup Comedy. “The short-form video app’s fingerprints are all over the Fringe this year, shaking up the 75-year-old arts festival with an injection of new talent and energy. Freshly TikTok-famous comedians have come to the Fringe for the first time, buoyed by their online success, while old hands are using the platform to find new audiences and experiment with material.”

‘The Internet’s Best Friend’: How One TikTok Comedian Gets Laughs While Raising Mental Health Awareness (CNET)

CNET: ‘The Internet’s Best Friend’: How One TikTok Comedian Gets Laughs While Raising Mental Health Awareness. “Social media can be a powerful tool for expressing yourself, bringing awareness to social issues and sharing compelling stories that resonate with your audience. Enter Elyse Myers, a comedian who uses platforms like TikTok and Instagram to share stories (like her infamous date where she bought 100 tacos), to make people laugh and to talk about her mental health. In a world of filters that give you bunny ears, there is Myers. She has become a staple of authenticity and honesty that people look to; she’s even lending her expertise to events like a mental health panel at VidCon next month.”

Ukraine, Russia, War, and Memes

I have a great interest in the intersection between military conflict and Internet culture, so I’ve been reviewing Ukraine/Russia war meme compilations on YouTube. The Meme Orange does compilations of spicy memes/ war memes regularly, while Memenade does daily meme compilations which include Ukraine memes. I think my favorite, though, is Dima Maleev. His channel states he is Ukrainian; I have not confirmed this but have no reason to disbelieve it. Anyway, instead of simple meme aggregations he takes four or five meme topics and gives background, context (like audio recordings) and plenty of meme reactions. There are only about four of these “WAR MEMES” videos (I’m sure they take a huge amount of work) but they’re well worth viewing. If you have trouble understanding accented English turn the captions on; they’re auto-generated but very good.

University of North Carolina: Comedian Lewis Black donates archive to UNC-Chapel Hill University Libraries

University of North Carolina: Comedian Lewis Black donates archive to UNC-Chapel Hill University Libraries. “Black, who has won Grammy Awards for his comedy albums and has written three best-selling books, recently donated his plays, television pilot scripts, and materials from his comedy career to the University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. They will be part of the Southern Historical Collection at the Wilson Special Collections Library.”

Washington Post: What’s so funny about a Russian invasion?

Washington Post: What’s so funny about a Russian invasion?. “Since the Kremlin’s attack began in February, Ukraine’s official Twitter account, @Ukraine, has been poking fun at the invader, even as it highlights the brutalities Russia is inflicting upon the country. Why? Wars are ugly and certainly no laughing matter. But Ukraine’s approach isn’t new. According to a 2017 NATO strategic communications study, Ukraine has used memes, caricatures, parodies and satirical TV shows as buffers against the Kremlin’s propaganda since the annexation of Crimea. The post-invasion tweets are a continuation of that counter-propaganda campaign.”

Jerusalem Post: In ‘Ukrainian military Oscars,’ Ukraine mocks Russia and promotes its army

Jerusalem Post: In ‘Ukrainian military Oscars,’ Ukraine mocks Russia and promotes its army . “Ukraine has been using memes and humor on state social media accounts in its information warfare strategy during the Russia-Ukraine War, and its state social media accounts were notable prior to the war for their effective use of memes to advocate foreign policy positions. Many of the selections for the ‘Ministry of Defense of Ukraine Oscars’ utilizes pre-existing wartime memes and symbols used by Ukraine and its supporters.”

‘It’s like SNL TikTok’: A peek inside ‘Stapleview,’ a viral live comedy show (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: ‘It’s like SNL TikTok’: A peek inside ‘Stapleview,’ a viral live comedy show. “With minutes to go before the premiere of the second episode of ‘Stapleview,’ the set of the sketch comedy show is abuzz with the unmistakable energy of a live production barreling rapidly toward showtime. But amid all the commotion — as crew members rush to set up script monitors and hand out last-minute props — the cast has its focus turned elsewhere. The actors are on their phones, using TikTok.”

CNET: No, Ukrainians Aren’t Selling Captured Russian Tanks on eBay

CNET: No, Ukrainians Aren’t Selling Captured Russian Tanks on eBay. “Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has prompted countless news stories, memes and videos. But not every report is true. One image circulating on social media showed what was supposedly an eBay listing selling a Russian tank captured in Ukraine, priced at $400,000 (roughly £299,740, AU$546,000). Now urban-legends site Snopes has dug into the story behind the listing and revealed that the tank photo has been on the web for more than a decade, and isn’t from any current eBay listing.”

Cracked: If Internet Service Providers Were Honest | Honest Ads (CenturyLink, Comcast, Cox Parody) (Video)

Another savage, enraging-but-funny video from Cracked: If Internet Service Providers Were Honest | Honest Ads (CenturyLink, Comcast, Cox Parody). “What if Internet Service Providers like Centurylink, Comcast, and Cox were actually honest about how horrifically terrible they are? Roger Horton investigates.” All sources cited in the video are included in the description.

The Conversation: How social media forces stand-up comedians like Trevor Noah and Basket Mouth to self-censor

The Conversation: How social media forces stand-up comedians like Trevor Noah and Basket Mouth to self-censor. “As an art form based on abuse and amusement, comedy uses potentially offensive material. One would expect the audience to be either delighted or infuriated. But stand-up comedy creates a space where a kind of agreement is reached, which renders most offensive gags inoffensive. This happens through elements like audiences choosing to attend, the venue and shared socio-cultural knowledge. Stand-up comedy has its own norms about how jokes are made and received. The synergy between comedians and live audiences allows for a momentary suspension of offence. But when these jokes start to circulate in a separate space – like social media – they are subjected to other sets of appraisal and questioning.”

Rapid Test Results

XKCD: Rapid Test Results . This is a cartoon, and moreover it’s an XKCD cartoon so there’s no way I can do it justice. Just click on it. Of course, if you’re reading this on the Web and I’m not trying to keep a plain text newsletter plain text, I can just put the cartoon here. You’ll still have to hit the link for the Alt text, though.