Radio Prague International: Recordings from trial with “chief symbol” of Nazi occupation K. H. Frank being restored

Radio Prague International: Recordings from trial with “chief symbol” of Nazi occupation K. H. Frank being restored. “Archivists at Czech Radio have discovered 1,300 discs of recordings from the 1946 trial with Karl Hermann Frank, who was in charge of the Nazi security forces during the wartime occupation of Bohemia and Moravia. The discs are currently in the process of digitisation, making it possible to play the sounds for the first time in more than 70 years.”

New York Times: Hungary pays big for a Chinese vaccine.

New York Times: Hungary pays big for a Chinese vaccine. “Hungary has agreed to pay about $36 a dose for the Covid-19 vaccine made by Sinopharm, a Chinese state-owned company, according to contracts made public by a senior Hungarian official on Thursday. That appears to make the Sinopharm shot among the most expensive in the world.”

Emerging Europe: Poland and Hungary are gunning for the social media giants

Emerging Europe: Poland and Hungary are gunning for the social media giants. “At a time when major social networks, primarily Facebook and Twitter, are facing increased scrutiny over issues such as the spreading of misinformation and the promotion of extremist ideologies that could undermine democracy, Poland is debating a new law that will stop social media platforms from deleting content or banning users who do not break Polish laws.”

Reporting Democracy: Fakebooks In Hungary And Poland

Reporting Democracy: Fakebooks In Hungary And Poland. “The creators behind Hundub in Hungary and Albicla in Poland both cite the dominance of the US social media companies and concern over their impact on free speech as reasons for their launch – a topic which has gained prominence since Facebook, Twitter and Instagram banned Donald Trump for his role in mobilising crowds that stormed the Capitol in Washington DC on January 6. It is notable that both of the new platforms hail from countries with nationalist-populist governments, whose supporters often rail against the power of the major social media platforms and their managers’ alleged anti-conservative bias.”

Coronavirus: Hungary first in EU to approve Russian vaccine (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Hungary first in EU to approve Russian vaccine. “Hungary has become the first country in the European Union to give preliminary approval to the Russian coronavirus vaccine, Sputnik V. On Thursday, Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s chief of staff confirmed both the Russian jab and the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine had been given the green light by the health authorities.”

“I Hunt for Photos Where the Photographer Captured Their Own World” – Interview with Fortepan Founder Miklós Tamási (Hungary Today)

Hungary Today: “I Hunt for Photos Where the Photographer Captured Their Own World” – Interview with Fortepan Founder Miklós Tamási. “Since its 2010 launch, Fortepan has slowly become Hungary’s most popular photo archive. The creator of the project, Miklós Tamási, launched the photo collection to document what everyday life was like in Hungary from the end of the 19th century until the democratic political transition in 1990. Today, there are not many people in Hungary who have never stumbled upon content from the online archive as dozens of articles and photo galleries are illustrated with pictures from here each and every day. – Today Fortepan is the most widely-known and used photo archive in Hungary. There is almost no newspaper reader or internet user who has not come across photos from here. What is the key to its success, and how is this archive different from any other?”

Gulf Times: Hungarians launch crowd-funded news site

Gulf Times: Hungarians launch crowd-funded news site. “Political journalist Attila Rovo began work yesterday at Hungary’s latest experiment in independent journalism – a crowd-funded online news service called Telex. Operating from a small apartment near the Danube and financed solely by donations from more than 34,000 readers, Telex is an attempt to break free from what Rovo and other critics describe as growing government influence over Hungary’s media via owners supportive of Prime Minister Viktor Orban.”

Techdirt: Hungary Has Fined Facebook For ‘Misleading Consumers’ Because It Promoted Its Service As ‘Free’

Techdirt: Hungary Has Fined Facebook For ‘Misleading Consumers’ Because It Promoted Its Service As ‘Free’. “Perhaps one of the more annoying points that people like to make when you point out that certain services are ‘free’ is for them to point out, pedantically, ‘but you pay with your data’ or some other such point. This is annoying because it’s (1) obvious and (2) not the point…. it appears that Hungary’s Competition Authority is playing this pedantic game on a larger scale and has fined Facebook approximately $4 million because it advertises its services as ‘Free and anyone can join’ on its front page.”

International Business Times: Hacker destroys Hungarian Development Center’s digital database

International Business Times: Hacker destroys Hungarian Development Center’s digital database. “As per the cybersecurity experts, educational institutions and government organizations have become major targets of the hackers, mostly in the cases of ransomware attacks. Recently a Hungarian government organization also became the victim of a massive cyberattack which destroyed its digital database.”

BloombergQuint: Google Gets EU Court Boost in Fight Over Hungary Advertising Tax

BloombergQuint: Google Gets EU Court Boost in Fight Over Hungary Advertising Tax. “Google got a boost in a tax case at the European Union’s top court that’s made the search-engine giant an unlikely ally of EU antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager in a clash with Hungary. The company’s Ireland unit should win its challenge over Hungary’s controversial advertising revenue tax, an adviser at the bloc’s highest court said on Thursday.”

Hyperallergic: In Hungary, an Online Photo Archive Fights Revisionist History

Not new, but new-to-me, from Hyperallergic: In Hungary, an Online Photo Archive Fights Revisionist History. “Miklos Tamási, founder of Fortepan, launched the free online photo archive after finding a collection of pictures in a pile of garbage on a Hungarian curbside. He named the site after the Forte film factories in Hungary, and debuted it in 2010 with 5,000 images. Since then, Fortepan has quickly expanded. Today it contains over 114,000 photographs taken by Hungarians between the years 1900 and 1990, and its first-ever exhibit opened in April at the Hungarian National Gallery.”

Hungary Today: New Database on Trianon Refugees Published

Hungary Today: New Database on Trianon Refugees Published. “A new database containing the names, residence, occupation, and place of arrival of more than 15,000 Hungarian refugees who arrived in Hungary between 1918 and 1928 has been published. These refugees had to leave their homes after a large part of Hungary’s land was transferred to neighboring countries after the Treaty of Trianon was signed.”