University of Nebraska-Lincoln: ‘Game Birds of the World’ collection available online

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: ‘Game Birds of the World’ collection available online. “The Game Birds of the World collection from the Nebraska State Museum is now available online. The collection is currently housed in Hardin Hall and now can be viewed on the School of Natural Resources website…. The collection contains more than 160 mounted individual game birds of 103 species from around the world.”

BusinessWire: State of Vermont, NIC Vermont Launch New Outdoor Recreation Mobile App (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: State of Vermont, NIC Vermont Launch New Outdoor Recreation Mobile App (PRESS RELEASE). “Built in partnership with the state’s digital government services partner, NIC Vermont, the mobile app provides a wide offering of features, including interactive maps, and enables users to easily access policy information and guidelines for activities, such as hunting, trapping, fishing, boating and hiking in Vermont.”

Waunakee Tribune: Marshall man hooked on vintage lures, decoys

New-to-me: a database of Wisconsin-affiliated fishing and duck lures. “[Gene] Davis said people are occasionally confused when they visit [his site]. They assume the images of more than 3,000 items posted are owned by the Marshall man and that all of the decoys and lures are for sale. His mission is more about providing information to other people, collectors or not, about the history of different Wisconsin-manufactured lures and decoys, not about making sales.”

MEL Magazine: Inside the Outrageously Prestigious World of Falcon Influencers

MEL Magazine: Inside the Outrageously Prestigious World of Falcon Influencers. “Falcon fever isn’t limited to the Middle East, though. Humanity’s fascination with the majestic, enigmatic birds has been resuscitated all over the globe. In the U.S. and U.K., a renewed interest in falcon hunting (not racing) has doubled the price of some raptors, increased the number of people applying for hard-to-get falconry licenses, and bizarrely, spawned the creation of a number of minor Instagram celebrities who drum up interest in the ancient pastime with flashy photos and heartwarming stories of interspecies friendship.” My jaw had dropped by the third paragraph of this article. I finally scraped it up and put it back on my face by the end. What a read. The last bit is somewhat icky and you should probably skip if you prefer rabbits to falcons.

Sun Journal: Social media posts about bird sightings may be harming Maine wildlife

Sun Journal: Social media posts about bird sightings may be harming Maine wildlife. “A Facebook group of Maine birders is asking its members to stop posting specific locations of rare species out of concern that the information is being used by hunters. The change to the private group’s policy stemmed from a post that alleged a hunter killed a king eider duck in Wells Harbor after he saw information about it on the group’s page. Although the Maine Birds Facebook group administrator who posted about the incident last month was not able to provide information to corroborate the allegation, the outrage it spurred from the group’s members speaks to a larger question about the ethics of using social media to seek out wildlife.”

Yellowknives Dene Creating Digital Archive

The Yellowknives Dene of Canada are creating a digital archive of traditional knowledge. Initially, at least, the archive will focus on Caribou. “The collection contains hundreds of maps and overlays sketched with elders’ land knowledge and more than a thousand hours of recordings sit haphazardly in boxes and bins. The oldest maps are cracked and yellow, dating back to 1970s, and were recorded for the Dene Mapping project.”