NPR: U.S. Disaster Response Scrambles To Protect People From Both Hurricanes And COVID-19

NPR: U.S. Disaster Response Scrambles To Protect People From Both Hurricanes And COVID-19. “A powerful storm could uproot tens of thousands of people at a time when coronavirus infections and deaths from COVID-19 are soaring through the region. Congregate shelters, from school gyms to vast convention centers, risk becoming infection hot spots if evacuees pack into them. Many shelters are managed by the American Red Cross under the supervision of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. But the Red Cross intends to adhere to new guidelines based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s social distancing standards, which could cut shelter capacity by as much as 60%, according to local emergency managers.”

WBTV: Hurricane season preparation includes some coronavirus considerations this year

WBTV: Hurricane season preparation includes some coronavirus considerations this year. “North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper has declared this week as Hurricane Preparedness Week across the state. The typical hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30, although tropical systems can occur outside those parameters as well. The governor’s advice is to use this week to talk about emergency plans with family members, update any emergency supplies and make sure your insurance is up to date. With the threat of coronavirus still out there, the governor also said evacuation plans should include an idea to stay at a hotel or inland with friends and family as emergency shelters may not be able to maintain much social distancing.”

Flooded: Oral Histories Documenting Hurricane Floyd Now Online (DigitalNC)

DigitalNC: Flooded: Oral Histories Documenting Hurricane Floyd Now Online. “We’ve recently worked with Braswell Memorial Library (Rocky Mount, N.C.) to digitize oral histories, written stories, and a manuscript all created for the book Flooded: Reflections of Hurricane Floyd. Compiled by the Friends of Braswell Library, Flooded represents the culmination of an effort to document what happened in Nash and Edgecombe counties twenty years ago today.”

Miami New Times: Bahamians Crowdsource Social Media to Find Relatives After Hurricane Dorian

Miami New Times: Bahamians Crowdsource Social Media to Find Relatives After Hurricane Dorian. “…Bahamian residents have created their own search teams on social media, WhatsApp, and even Google Docs. Facebook groups that formed years ago to share local happenings are now being used to locate missing loved ones. A WhatsApp group chat with almost 300 members searching for relatives is at capacity. And locals are accounting for those who have been found safe through a crowdsourced spreadsheet.”

Texas Observer: Two Houston Archives Gather Harvey Memories for Historians of the Future

New-to-me, from Texas Observer: Two Houston Archives Gather Harvey Memories for Historians of the Future. “The Houston Flood Museum and the Harvey Memories Project. Both are online-only, open-access archives, and they’re still growing. Together, they provide a compelling snapshot of the destruction wrought by the deadliest storm to hit Texas since 1919. They’re also meant to endure for decades as a resource to future scholars and community members.”

Poynter: A quick guide to avoiding hoaxes and false news about Dorian (or any other hurricane)

Poynter: A quick guide to avoiding hoaxes and false news about Dorian (or any other hurricane). “Just like any other life-threating natural phenomenon, strong winds are usually felt on social media long before they really affect people’s life. Hurricanes, just like floods or earthquakes, are commonly surrounded by hoaxes and might trigger the sharing of false information. To prevent this, the International Fact-Checking Network has built a quick guide that not only can be applied to Hurricane Dorian, but also to any other storm in the near future.”

Pacific Standard: A New Database Tracks The Fate Of Hurricane Maria’s Indirect Victims

Pacific Standard: A New Database Tracks The Fate Of Hurricane Maria’s Indirect Victims. “These deaths and nearly 500 others are recorded in a new database released by three journalism organizations: the Associated Press, the Center for Investigative Journalism in Puerto Rico, and Quartz. The organizations collected reports from Puerto Ricans who believed their loved ones died as a result of Hurricane Maria but whose death certificates didn’t indicate storm conditions as a cause of death. The database is a more personal portrait of Maria’s victims, most of whom died not directly because of Maria’s winds and flooding, but indirectly because of a lack of electricity, medical care, and communication in the wake of the storm.”

Wired: How To Use Social Media Responsibly During Hurricane Florence

Wired: How To Use Social Media Responsibly During Hurricane Florence. “As you monitor social media for news of the hurricane, remember that social media makes everyone a publisher: With each tweet and retweet you have power to affect events. That has democratized access to information and storytelling but also contributes to information (and misinformation) overload. Like traditional publishers, social media denizens have a responsibility during crises to try to not make things worse. Here are some things to keep in mind while reading and sharing during a natural disaster.”

Poynter: 12+ tools and resources useful during hurricanes and other disasters

Poynter: 12+ tools and resources useful during hurricanes and other disasters. “We know this script. On this day last year, I was working remotely from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, after a grueling 19-hour evacuation from Florida. I was one of the millions of Floridians fleeing Hurricane Irma, then poised to strike Florida as a category four or five hurricane. A handful of tools and resources made our preparation, evacuation, coverage and recovery a little bit easier and more complete. I shared some of them in this newsletter last year, but following is an updated list with additional resources and context.”

Rice University: Rice U.’s new Harvey Memories Project preserves digital artifacts of the ‘first social media storm’

Rice University: Rice U.’s new Harvey Memories Project preserves digital artifacts of the ‘first social media storm’. I mentioned this last April but it looks like now it’s up and running. “The Harvey Memories Project is one of several projects awarded funding by the Rice Houston Engagement and Recovery Effort last year. The goal of the project is to build an open-access digital repository to collect, preserve and publish community-contributed memories of the storm in multiple formats, including photos of storm preparations and cleanup, audio and video recordings of the storm in progress, survivors’ narratives and even art.”

ENDI: Map for community management

ENDI: Map for community management. “[Vivian Moreno] is concerned about the reliability of the statistics provided by the government of Puerto Rico and the political-partisan perspective for many public issues. Yesterday, the goal behind a workshop organized by the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College was to work, somehow, the data issue. The idea was simple: to create a database between different Puerto Rican communities in order to stop relying on government information, and move aid and resources where they are needed.”

Coastal Review: ‘Harm’s Way’ Exhibit Shows Century of Storms

Coastal Review: ‘Harm’s Way’ Exhibit Shows Century of Storms. “The Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center has collected accounts and artifacts from the storms that have molded the coast into what it is today and has compiled ‘Harm’s Way: How Storms Have Shaped Our Communities, Our History and Us,’ an exhibit and online resource that tells how the last hundred-plus years of storms have affected Hatteras, Ocracoke and Down East Carteret County.”

USGS: USGS Tracks How Hurricane Floodwaters Spread Non-Native Freshwater Plants and Animals

USGS: USGS Tracks How Hurricane Floodwaters Spread Non-Native Freshwater Plants and Animals. “Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, and Nate may have spread non-native freshwater plants and animals into new water bodies, where some of them can disrupt living communities or change the landscape. To help land managers find and manage these flood-borne newcomers, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey have created four online maps, one for each hurricane.”