The Next Web: IBM achieves true ‘quantum supremacy’ with most powerful computer ever built

The Next Web: IBM achieves true ‘quantum supremacy’ with most powerful computer ever built. “Healthy skepticism: We’re not sure exactly what Eagle does. Modern quantum computers usually solve bespoke problems that have little-to-no impact on society. This is because the technology is in its infancy. The point of building a quantum computer, today, is to see how far we can push this rudimentary technology on our way towards a simple goal: quantum supremacy.”

VentureBeat: IBM finds cloud credentials sell for mere dollars in ‘booming’ dark web market

VentureBeat: IBM finds cloud credentials sell for mere dollars in ‘booming’ dark web market. “Cyberattacks have been increasing in both frequency and severity, but it’s not just because malicious actors are upping their game (though they very much are). Many cybersecurity veterans feel that the effective solutions the industry has put out over the years aren’t fully being taken advantage of, and now a new report from IBM sheds light on the ways enterprises are leaving the door wide open. It also details a ‘booming’ dark web marketplace for compromised cloud accounts, where some credentials are selling for just a few dollars.”

Hackaday: IRC Server For MS-DOS

Hackaday: IRC Server For MS-DOS . “The recent flurry of projects based around Internet Relay Chat (IRC) should be a fair indication that the beloved protocol is not going anywhere. Now, thanks to [Mike Chambers], you can add to the IRC ecosystem by hosting your very own MS-DOS based IRC server.” I had a PC XT that I had to use with a black and white TV because I couldn’t afford a real monitor. Sunday nostalgia: it’s real.

Fast Company: IBM’s new AI tool figures out exactly how much carbon each tree can capture

Fast Company: IBM’s new AI tool figures out exactly how much carbon each tree can capture. “All trees suck up CO2 as they grow. But the type of tree and where it’s planted make a difference in how much carbon it can capture—and when companies pay for carbon offsets in forests, they’re often based on generic estimates that may not quite represent what’s actually growing in an area. A new tool in development from IBM uses AI to precisely map specific trees and better understand their climate benefit.”

Quantum computing: IBM’s new tool lets users design quantum chips in minutes (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Quantum computing: IBM’s new tool lets users design quantum chips in minutes. “Building the hardware that underpins quantum computers might not sound like everybody’s cup of tea, but IBM is determined to make the idea sound less challenging. The company has announced the general availability of Qiskit Metal, an open-source platform that automates parts of the design process for quantum chips, and which IBM promised will now let ‘anyone’ design quantum hardware.”

TechRepublic: IBM creates an open source tool to simplify API documentation

TechRepublic: IBM creates an open source tool to simplify API documentation. “APIs are essential to programming, but they can get complicated. IBM has launched a new tool for developers that should make writing API documentation a bit easier: The OpenAPI Comment Parser. ‘Developers need instructions on how to use your API and they need a way to try it out. Good documentation handles both,’ IBM developer advocate Nicholas Bourdakos said in a blog post about the new developer tool.”

The Next Web: Companies made millions building unemployment websites that didn’t work

The Next Web: Companies made millions building unemployment websites that didn’t work. “States continue to spend millions of dollars hiring Deloitte, IBM, and other contractors to build and fix unemployment websites, even amid growing concerns about the quality of their work. And the crush of unemployment applications flooding in around the country since the pandemic hit have only made the situation worse.”

CNET: Give IBM your unused computing power to help cure coronavirus and cancer

CNET: Give IBM your unused computing power to help cure coronavirus and cancer. “When Sawyer Thompson was just 12 years old, he discovered his father Brett unconscious in their Washington, DC area home. Sawyer called an ambulance and Brett was rushed to the hospital, where the family learned the worst: He had brain cancer. After a year of surgeries, radiation and chemotherapy, Brett’s cancer is in remission. But Sawyer wanted to do more to fight against cancer, and is tapping his interest in tech to make a bigger difference.”