C4ISRNET: Marines want tool to identify fake social media accounts posing as senior personnel

C4ISRNET: Marines want tool to identify fake social media accounts posing as senior personnel. “The U.S. Marine Corps wants a commercial off-the-shelf tool to identify social media accounts that pose a threat to personnel and the Marines Corps Enterprise Network. According to a request for quotation released Aug. 20, the goal of the effort is to identify ‘evil twin’ social media accounts, or accounts pretending to be key personnel, general officers and senior executive service employees. The RFQ claimed these fake accounts are sending malicious links to service members, as well as extorting information and money while posing as key members of the Corps.”

EurekAlert: No honor among cyber thieves

EurekAlert: No honor among cyber thieves. “A backstabbing crime boss and thousands of people looking for free tutorials on hacking and identity theft were two of the more interesting findings of a study examining user activity on two online ‘carding forums,’ illegal sites that specialize in stolen credit card information.”

Motherboard: NSO Group Impersonated Facebook to Help Clients Hack Targets

Motherboard: NSO Group Impersonated Facebook to Help Clients Hack Targets. “Infamous Israeli surveillance firm NSO Group created a web domain that looked as if it belonged to Facebook’s security team to entice targets to click on links that would install the company’s powerful cell phone hacking technology, according to data analyzed by Motherboard.”

Gizmodo: Judge Orders FCC to Hand Over IP Addresses Linked to Fake Net Neutrality Comments

Gizmodo: Judge Orders FCC to Hand Over IP Addresses Linked to Fake Net Neutrality Comments. “A Manhattan federal judge has ruled the Federal Communications Commission must provide two reporters access to server logs that may provide new insight into the allegations of fraud stemming from agency’s 2017 net neutrality rollback.”

The Verge: Cryptocurrency company sues YouTube for letting scammers impersonate its CEO

The Verge: Cryptocurrency company sues YouTube for letting scammers impersonate its CEO. “Cryptocurrency company Ripple is suing YouTube for its ‘inexplicable failure’ at stopping scammers from impersonating its CEO. In a complaint filed today, Ripple accused the video platform of selling ads and verifying accounts that promote fake cryptocurrency giveaways, then ignoring complaints about them.”

OneZero: Data Thieves Are Targeting Dead People’s Social Media Accounts

OneZero: Data Thieves Are Targeting Dead People’s Social Media Accounts. “In 2012, the family of a deceased soldier in the United States was blindsided when they started seeing his face on ads for dating websites. His photo was being used to entice more people to visit the site. In another case, a woman received new Facebook messages sent from the account of a dead friend, says Faheem Hussain, a clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University who studies the digital afterlife. Someone was impersonating her friend and using his account to harass her. While she knew she could block the account, she hesitated because it was also her last remaining connection to her friend.”

Ars Technica: Companies are stealing influencers’ faces

Ars Technica: Companies are stealing influencers’ faces. “The first time Lucy Kyselica’s face was stolen, it turned up in the window of a beauty salon in small-town America. Kyselica is a Dutch beauty YouTuber who mostly makes videos about historical hairdos, but she had also made a video showing her subscribers how to thread their own eyebrows. The salon took a screengrab from that video, enlarged it to poster size, and used it to advertise their eyebrow threading services.”

BuzzFeed News: Political Operatives Are Faking Voter Outrage With Millions Of Made-Up Comments To Benefit The Rich And Powerful

BuzzFeed News: Political Operatives Are Faking Voter Outrage With Millions Of Made-Up Comments To Benefit The Rich And Powerful. “A BuzzFeed News investigation — based on an analysis of millions of comments, along with court records, business filings, and interviews with dozens of people — offers a window into how a crucial democratic process was skewed by one of the most prolific uses of political impersonation in US history. In a key part of the puzzle, two little-known firms, Media Bridge and LCX Digital, working on behalf of industry group Broadband for America, misappropriated names and personal information as part of a bid to submit more than 1.5 million statements favorable to their cause.”

Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services

Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services. “Suspicious bootlegs and fraudulent uploads are nothing new in digital music, but the problem has infiltrated paid streaming services in unexpected and troubling ways. Artists face the possibility of impersonators uploading fake music to their official profiles, stolen music being uploaded under false monikers, and of course, simple human error resulting in botched uploads. Meanwhile, keen fans have figured out where they can find illegally uploaded, purposefully mistitled songs in user playlists.”

New York Times: Facebook Connected Her to a Tattooed Soldier in Iraq. Or So She Thought.

New York Times: Facebook Connected Her to a Tattooed Soldier in Iraq. Or So She Thought.. “While fraud has proliferated on Facebook for years, those running the military romance scams are taking on not only one of the world’s most influential companies, but also the most powerful military — and succeeding. Many scammers operate from their phones in Nigeria and other African nations, working several victims at the same time. In interviews in Nigeria, six men told The New York Times that the love hoaxes were lucrative and low risk.”

How-To Geek: Fake LinkedIn Profiles Are Impossible to Detect

How-To Geek: Fake LinkedIn Profiles Are Impossible to Detect. “Don’t trust everything you see on LinkedIn. We created a fake LinkedIn profile with a fake job at a real company. Our fake profile garnered the attention of a Google recruiter and gained over 170 connections and 100 skill endorsements. Everyone is talking about fake accounts on Facebook and fake followers on Twitter. LinkedIn hasn’t been part of the conversation, but Microsoft’s social network also has a big problem.”

The Atlantic: How to Spot the Latest Disinformation Campaign

The Atlantic: How to Spot the Latest Disinformation Campaign. “There is a very small chance that you came across what appeared to be an Atlantic article about the war in Yemen in September of 2017. The author, according to the byline, was Aria Bendix, a regular global news writer. Every link in the story went to other Atlantic stories. It even included the module shilling low-brow content slurry, which used to appear on Atlantic articles, at the bottom of the page. On first glance, that is to say, you might not have known that you were looking at a counterfeit story, produced as part of a global disinformation campaign that was recently unearthed by the researchers at Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto.”

Schneier on Security: Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft

Schneier on Security: Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft. “I don’t have a lot of good news for you. The truth is there’s nothing we can do to protect our data from being stolen by cybercriminals and others. Ten years ago, I could have given you all sorts of advice about using encryption, not sending information over email, securing your web connections, and a host of other things­ — but most of that doesn’t matter anymore. Today, your sensitive data is controlled by others, and there’s nothing you can personally to do affect its security.”

CBR Online: This Dark Web Store Deals in “Digital Doppelgangers” – Unique Chromium Plugin, Anti Fraud-Busting Tools

CBR Online: This Dark Web Store Deals in “Digital Doppelgangers” – Unique Chromium Plugin, Anti Fraud-Busting Tools. “Criminals behind a shop on the Dark Web that is trading over 60,000 ‘digital identities’ have developed a wide range of sophisticated tools to help users bypass machine learning-based anti-fraud systems, researchers at Kaspersky Lab say. Customers using Genesis marketplace can purchase unique ‘digital masks’, or hijack those of legitimate online shoppers; piggybacking on the behavioural characteristics of innocent users to circumvent anti-fraud software, the company said.”