Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services

Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services. “Suspicious bootlegs and fraudulent uploads are nothing new in digital music, but the problem has infiltrated paid streaming services in unexpected and troubling ways. Artists face the possibility of impersonators uploading fake music to their official profiles, stolen music being uploaded under false monikers, and of course, simple human error resulting in botched uploads. Meanwhile, keen fans have figured out where they can find illegally uploaded, purposefully mistitled songs in user playlists.”

New York Times: Facebook Connected Her to a Tattooed Soldier in Iraq. Or So She Thought.

New York Times: Facebook Connected Her to a Tattooed Soldier in Iraq. Or So She Thought.. “While fraud has proliferated on Facebook for years, those running the military romance scams are taking on not only one of the world’s most influential companies, but also the most powerful military — and succeeding. Many scammers operate from their phones in Nigeria and other African nations, working several victims at the same time. In interviews in Nigeria, six men told The New York Times that the love hoaxes were lucrative and low risk.”

How-To Geek: Fake LinkedIn Profiles Are Impossible to Detect

How-To Geek: Fake LinkedIn Profiles Are Impossible to Detect. “Don’t trust everything you see on LinkedIn. We created a fake LinkedIn profile with a fake job at a real company. Our fake profile garnered the attention of a Google recruiter and gained over 170 connections and 100 skill endorsements. Everyone is talking about fake accounts on Facebook and fake followers on Twitter. LinkedIn hasn’t been part of the conversation, but Microsoft’s social network also has a big problem.”

The Atlantic: How to Spot the Latest Disinformation Campaign

The Atlantic: How to Spot the Latest Disinformation Campaign. “There is a very small chance that you came across what appeared to be an Atlantic article about the war in Yemen in September of 2017. The author, according to the byline, was Aria Bendix, a regular global news writer. Every link in the story went to other Atlantic stories. It even included the module shilling low-brow content slurry, which used to appear on Atlantic articles, at the bottom of the page. On first glance, that is to say, you might not have known that you were looking at a counterfeit story, produced as part of a global disinformation campaign that was recently unearthed by the researchers at Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto.”

Schneier on Security: Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft

Schneier on Security: Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft. “I don’t have a lot of good news for you. The truth is there’s nothing we can do to protect our data from being stolen by cybercriminals and others. Ten years ago, I could have given you all sorts of advice about using encryption, not sending information over email, securing your web connections, and a host of other things­ — but most of that doesn’t matter anymore. Today, your sensitive data is controlled by others, and there’s nothing you can personally to do affect its security.”

CBR Online: This Dark Web Store Deals in “Digital Doppelgangers” – Unique Chromium Plugin, Anti Fraud-Busting Tools

CBR Online: This Dark Web Store Deals in “Digital Doppelgangers” – Unique Chromium Plugin, Anti Fraud-Busting Tools. “Criminals behind a shop on the Dark Web that is trading over 60,000 ‘digital identities’ have developed a wide range of sophisticated tools to help users bypass machine learning-based anti-fraud systems, researchers at Kaspersky Lab say. Customers using Genesis marketplace can purchase unique ‘digital masks’, or hijack those of legitimate online shoppers; piggybacking on the behavioural characteristics of innocent users to circumvent anti-fraud software, the company said.”

Poynter: This website impersonated a fact-checking outlet to publish fake news stories

Poynter: This website impersonated a fact-checking outlet to publish fake news stories. “Someone is publishing fake news stories on a website that looks like a fact-checking organization. On Wednesday, Brazilian fact-checker Aos Fatos published an investigation about a fake news website that had ripped off its brand to publish bogus content. Instead of AosFatos.org, the network published to AosFatos.com.”