MakeUseOf: How to Get Verified on Twitter and Finally Get That Blue Check Mark

MakeUseOf: How to Get Verified on Twitter and Finally Get That Blue Check Mark. “Twitter, like most social media platforms, offers a verification system. Its purpose is to clearly identify legitimate high-profile accounts, proving that other users can trust who that account claims to represent. In May 2021, Twitter re-opened the verification process to everyone. Here’s how to apply for Twitter verification, and what you should know about the process.”

9to5 Mac: Twitter officially relaunching verification program in January, here are the details

9to5Mac: Twitter officially relaunching verification program in January, here are the details. “In November, Twitter officially confirmed it would be bringing back its account verification process in early 2021 and shared a policy draft. Now the company has shared all of the fine details on how the relaunched system will work along with how user feedback shaped the new Twitter verification program that’s arriving in January 2021.”

KnowTechie: TikTok creators are coughing up more than $1,000 to get their accounts verified

KnowTechie: TikTok creators are coughing up more than $1,000 to get their accounts verified. “Everyone wants to be a TikTok star these days. And one of the best ways of getting there is getting a coveted blue checkmark next to your name. In other words, getting verified on the platform. And now it seems like a decent amount of creators are paying cold-hard cash to seedy brokers to get their account verified, and in some cases, it costs over $1,000.”

BetaNews: Want to get verified on Twitter? It could happen in 2021

BetaNews: Want to get verified on Twitter? It could happen in 2021. “Twitter’s verifications initiative ran into problems three years ago when it found itself under heavy criticism for awarding blue ticks to numerous controversial accounts. When 2021 rolls around, the company is planning to start verifying people who fall into various categories — government; companies, brands and organizations; news; entertainment; sports; and activists, organizers, and other influential individuals.”

PC Magazine: Want to Get Verified on Instagram? A Huge Follower Account Isn’t Enough

PC Magazine: Want to Get Verified on Instagram? A Huge Follower Account Isn’t Enough. “Instagram says it noticed that people were turning to the platform to raise awareness and promote the causes they were invested in, especially in the midst of the pandemic, racial tensions, and the 2020 election. So it created a new Instagram Equity team ‘that will focus on better understanding and addressing bias in our product development and people’s experiences on Instagram’—including fairness in algorithms.”

Rantt Media: Some 2020 Candidates Struggle To Get Verified On Twitter

Rantt Media: Some 2020 Candidates Struggle To Get Verified On Twitter . “On the matter of blue checkmarks, one of the most powerful Twitter initiatives to ensure election integrity is its candidate verification program. But complaints from candidates and their campaigns suggest that execution of Twitter’s candidate verification program needs some improvement. A blue checkmark, denoting verification on candidates’ profiles, has been elusive. A number of candidates who are on the ballot for Congress in November were frustrated by long delays in getting Twitter to verify their accounts. Others who are on the ballot in the general election still don’t have their accounts verified, as of this writing.”

The Verge: Twitter’s messy verification process is making candidates wait

The Verge: Twitter’s messy verification process is making candidates wait. “On Friday morning, Jeff Sites, a challenger to Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, didn’t have a blue verification badge on his official Twitter page. Sites had announced his campaign months earlier, so he should have been verified months ago. It caught the eye of one volunteer named Nancy Levine, who has been monitoring Twitter’s plan to verify all 2020 candidates, and has been lobbying Twitter on Sites’ behalf specifically. After speaking with Levine, The Verge contacted Twitter to inquire about the nature of the delay; within hours, the candidate was verified.”

Nieman Lab: Native verification tools for the blue checkmark crowd

Nieman Lab: Native verification tools for the blue checkmark crowd. “…my prediction for the coming year is that at least one platform will engage with its most influential users, giving them access to special tools and training to identify and contextualize sources and claims in their feeds. This will allow platforms to split the difference between a clutter-free onboarding for Aunt Jane and a full-featured verification and sourcing interface for users whose every retweet goes out to hundreds of thousands of people, or whose page or group serves as an information hub for users and activists. These tools and training will also eventually be released to the general public, though for the general public, they will default to off.” I’d be more excited about this if the verification process on Twitter weren’t such a mess. (Brand names like Mr. Peanut get verified. Actual humans might have a harder time.)