British Library Blog: Three Alexander the Great manuscripts newly digitised

British Library Blog: Three Alexander the Great manuscripts newly digitised. “In preparation for the exhibition, we have digitised three more of our illustrated Alexander manuscripts, so that, in addition to the pages on display in the exhibition, all the images and accompanying text can be viewed online. One of the newly-digitised items is an early collection of Latin works; the others are French versions of Alexander’s life story, as told by the Roman historian, Quintus Curtius Rufus.”

British Library Blog: From Julian of Norwich to Eleanor Cobham: more magnificent manuscripts online

British Library Blog: From Julian of Norwich to Eleanor Cobham: more magnificent manuscripts online. “Readers of this Blog may know about out ambitious project to digitise a selection of manuscripts, rolls and charters connected with Medieval and Renaissance Women. Here we reveal another ten volumes that are now available online, including important literary manuscripts, a guide for female recluses, obituary calendars, and a volume with its own embroidered bookbinding.”

Library of Congress: The Giant Bible of Mainz Digitized by the Library of Congress

Library of Congress: The Giant Bible of Mainz Digitized by the Library of Congress. “The Giant Bible of Mainz, one of the last handwritten giant bibles in Europe, has now been digitized by the Library of Congress, ensuring online access to an important national treasure from the 15th century…. The Giant Bible is famous for having been copied by a single scribe, who precisely dated his progress between April 4, 1452, and July 9, 1453. These dates are remarkable because they place the creation of this manuscript bible in proximity to the first printed bible crafted in Europe, the Gutenberg Bible.”

British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog: Virtual private view of Gold on the British Library Player

British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog: Virtual private view of Gold on the British Library Player. “Many thanks to all of our readers who have visited the Gold exhibition of illuminated manuscripts at the Library; we’ve had some great feedback from you. … you can now watch two videos about the exhibition: (1) a highlights video outlining the exhibition and featuring curators discussing seven manuscripts in detail as a virtual private view; and (2) a film of a live question and answer session with the curators, chaired by Professor Alixe Bovey, Dean and Deputy Director of the Courtauld Institute of Art.”

Aleteia: The first book ever printed in Ukraine was this illustrated Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles

Aleteia: The first book ever printed in Ukraine was this illustrated Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles. “A priceless piece of Ukrainian Christian history, preserved for the better part of 500 years, is one of the latest exhibits to enter the world of digital art. Titled Apostol, or Apostolos, the work contains the texts of the Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles. It was digitized and placed online for the world to view thanks to the Bodleian Library…. According to Bodleian, this is the first book that was ever printed in L’viv, Ukraine, between 1564 and 1581.”

My Modern Met: You Can Now Explore All of ‘The Book of Kells’ for Free Online

My Modern Met: You Can Now Explore All of ‘The Book of Kells’ for Free Online. “When people think of Ireland, the rolling green hills, Guinness beer, and twisted Celtic knots might be what comes to mind. The small island nation has a storied history of resistance to oppression and perseverance through famine, but the most iconic piece of Irish history dates to the early medieval period. The Book of Kells—held in the library of Trinity College Dublin—is a masterpiece of medieval illumination and manuscript craft. The legendary volume is now available in new high-resolution scans for free online browsing.”

British Library: Antoine de Lonhy and the Saluces Hours

British Library: Antoine de Lonhy and the Saluces Hours . “The Saluces Hours is a manuscript with a complicated genesis. It was produced in Savoy, which in the 15th century was in independent duchy, and today comprises an area of southeast France and northwest Italy. The manuscript was originally begun around the 1440s, several decades before Lonhy’s involvement in the project. In this first stage, the text was probably completed and the process of illuminating the book begun.” Breathtaking! I probably say that half the time for illuminated manuscripts, but it’s always true.

British Library: Over 4,500 manuscripts now online

British Library: Over 4,500 manuscripts now online. “Long-term readers of our blog may know that we periodically publish lists of our digitised manuscripts, the last of which was published in July 2020. With the arrival of the New Year and the beginning of a new lockdown in the UK, we are releasing an update to our lists of manuscript hyperlinks. We hope this makes it easier for readers and researchers to explore our amazing digitised treasures online.”

To Hold Nature in the Hand: Revealing the Wonders of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta (Getty)

Getty: To Hold Nature in the Hand: Revealing the Wonders of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta. “Small enough to hold in the hand, the allure of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta (Wondrous Monuments of Calligraphy) in the Getty Museum’s collection of manuscripts is undeniable. Hold the book close enough, and the butterflies seem to quiver before your eyes and the fruit looks good enough to eat….Viewable in a newly published facsimile and online, readers can now appreciate the impossibly tiny spiraling micro-writing; observe the subtle differences between the green leaves of the crossed tulips; almost feel the rusting surface of the apple; and be delighted by the hair-fine web spun by the spider.”

Cambridge Independent: St John’s College digitises 13th-century Robert de Lindsay manuscript

Cambridge Independent: St John’s College digitises 13th-century Robert de Lindsay manuscript. “A 13th-century illuminated manuscript that has been in St John’s College for nearly 400 years has been digitised to reach a new audience. The 377-page manuscript is a psalter – the most common medieval religious text known as devotionals – that belonged to Robert de Lindsay, the Abbot of Peterborough from 1214 to 1222.”

Hyperallergic: Access Rare and Beautiful “Manuscripts of the Muslim World” via UPenn’s Digital Library

Hyperallergic: Access Rare and Beautiful “Manuscripts of the Muslim World” via UPenn’s Digital Library. “All materials on OPenn are in the public domain or released under Creative Commons licenses as Free Cultural Works. The MMW Project characterizes these materials as ‘mostly unresearched,’ perhaps encouraging a curious army of sequestered armchair historians to dig into this wealth more than 500 manuscripts and 827 paintings from the Islamicate world broadly construed.”

British Library: Happy anniversary to the Polonsky Project

British Library: Happy anniversary to the Polonsky Project. “Today is the one-year anniversary of the launch of our collaborative interpretative and digitisation project with the Bibliothèque nationale de France, The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200. A year ago we met in Paris as part of a three-day international conference to celebrate two new bilingual websites that provide unprecedented access to some of the riches of our two national collections. Thanks to generous funding from The Polonsky Foundation, each Library digitised 400 manuscripts made in either England or France before the year 1200.”

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts. “Led by Lehigh University, a partnership of 15 Philadelphia-area libraries has scanned and digitized more than 160,000 pages from 475 original manuscripts, the earliest dating to the ninth century. The hand-lettered and illustrated pages range from brightly hued, gold-leafed illuminated works of art to functional texts intended for students of science, philosophy and religion.”

Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge (British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog)

British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog: Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge. “For the last three years, the ‘Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge’ project has been investigating the large number of manuscripts written in insular scripts between the mid-7th and the mid-9th centuries. The project aims to examine knowledge exchange in early medieval Europe through analysis of these manuscripts. Some of the manuscripts were written in Britain and Ireland, but many were written in Francia and northern Italy, in monasteries which had been founded by missionaries from Ireland and the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.”