DigitalArts: TikTok and how to use it for illustration success

DigitalArts: TikTok and how to use it for illustration success. “With Instagram doing its best to throttle visibility, more and more digital artists wanting to jump ship to another platform find themselves at a loose end. Twitter was an increasingly popular choice, until the little blue bird began to heavily compress images, whilst Facebook continues its steady decline into a graveyard for artistic exposure. A surprising option though comes in the form of an app best known for music and skits, closer to the dearly departed Vine rather than something like ArtStation. We’re of course talking about much-talked about app of the moment TikTok; less talked about though is how some illustrators are finding a fanbase on the platform through an interesting symbiosis of sound and vision.”

MakeUseOf: 5 Free Stock Illustration Sites to Download Copyright-Free Designs and Vectors

MakeUseOf: 5 Free Stock Illustration Sites to Download Copyright-Free Designs and Vectors. “You can always grab real stock photographs, but plain stock images seem a bit stuffy and old-school now, don’t they? Illustrations add that extra zing to seem modern and trendy. These portals will give you customizable style-packs as well as images that concentrate on diversity and inclusiveness.”

Cornell: Botanical illustration pioneer goes from obscurity to online

Cornell: Botanical illustration pioneer goes from obscurity to online. “Dating back to 1826 and brimming with meticulous descriptions and vivid watercolor illustrations, Nancy Anne Kingsbury Wollstonecraft’s manuscript, ‘Specimens of the Plants and Fruits of the Island of Cuba,’ never saw print in her lifetime despite her attempts at publication. Nearly two centuries later, the lush life she captured can now be admired and downloaded from HathiTrust, where it was shared by Cornell University Library.”

Clements Library Chronicles: Announcing the Illustrated Manuscripts Project

Thanks to John O. for bringing this to my attention. From the Clements Library Chronicles: Announcing the Illustrated Manuscripts Project. “For over 15 years, as Clements Library staff have processed manuscript collections, read letters, and hunted for information, we’ve also been documenting the hand-made drawings that appear throughout the Manuscripts Division. To date we’ve identified over 2,500 images from nearly 500 separate collections. Scribbled in margins, sketched on envelopes, pasted into volumes, these illustrations are largely hidden within larger bodies of papers and therefore commonly uncataloged, their research value untapped. In January of 2018 we launched the Illustrated Manuscripts Project in the hopes of changing that.”

Galway Daily: Amazing new database with pics of 18th and 19th Century Ireland launched

Galway Daily: Amazing new database with pics of 18th and 19th Century Ireland launched. “How was Ireland depicted in illustrations produced by travellers from 1680 to 1860? A new database of images drawn from travel accounts answers this question. Based on years of research by a group of investigators at NUI Galway led by Professor Jane Conroy, Ireland Illustrated is now available to view online.”

Jalopnik: Now’s Your Chance To Get A Poster Featuring Literally Every Single Toyota Ever Sold Here

Jalopnik: Now’s Your Chance To Get A Poster Featuring Literally Every Single Toyota Ever Sold Here. “Artist Darren Zayman just completed a two-year project to draw all 269 body variants of every single Toyota ever sold in the United States, and even a few that may not have been sold here. … Zayman, a 42-year-old web designer, began his frankly insane journey almost 20 years ago, when he started drawing every car featured on his website that sold parts for rear-wheel-drive Japanese cars, which started as ToyotaReference.com. … And faced with his new website… Zayman has begun an even larger quest. He aims to illustrate every single Japanese car ever sold in the U.S.”

Mental Floss: The Library of Congress Wants Your Help Identifying World War I-Era Political Cartoons

Mental Floss: The Library of Congress Wants Your Help Identifying World War I-Era Political Cartoons. “The Library of Congress just debuted its new digital innovation lab, an initiative that aims to improve upon its massive archives and use them in creative ways. Its first project is Beyond Words, a digitization effort designed to make the research library’s historical newspaper collection more search-friendly. It aims to classify and tag historical images from World War I-era newspapers, identifying political cartoons, comics, illustrations, and photos within old news archives. The images come from newspapers included in Chronicling America, the library’s existing newspaper digitization project.”