Stable Diffusion in your pocket? “Draw Things” brings AI images to iPhone (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Stable Diffusion in your pocket? “Draw Things” brings AI images to iPhone. “On Wednesday, a San Francisco-based developer named Liu Liu released Draw Things: AI Generation, a free app available in the App Store that lets iPhone owners run the popular Stable Diffusion AI image generator. Type in a description, and the app generates an image within several minutes. It’s a notable step toward bringing image synthesis to a wider audience—with the added privacy of running it on your own hardware.

Ars Technica: “Too easy“—Midjourney tests dramatic new version of its AI image generator

Ars Technica: “Too easy“—Midjourney tests dramatic new version of its AI image generator. “On Saturday, AI image service Midjourney began alpha testing version 4 (‘v4’) of its text-to-image synthesis model, which is available for subscribers on its Discord server. The new model provides more detail than previously available on the service, inspiring some AI artists to remark that v4 almost makes it ‘too easy’ to get high-quality results from simple prompts.”

TechCrunch: Digital assets marketplace Creative Fabrica launches generative AI tool

TechCrunch: Digital assets marketplace Creative Fabrica launches generative AI tool. “Creative Fabrica, a marketplace for digital files like print-on-demand assets, fonts and graphics, announced today it will launch its own generative AI tool. Called CF Spark, it’s already seen three million prompts generated, and more than 500,000 published by Creative Fabrica creators over the past three weeks. Like other digital assets on the platform, users can put up their generative AI files for paid use by other members, which Creative Fabrica says makes it the first generative AI that also allows creators to make money.”

Hackaday: How The Art-generating AI Of Stable Diffusion Works

Hackaday: How The Art-generating AI Of Stable Diffusion Works. “[Jay Alammar] has put up an illustrated guide to how Stable Diffusion works, and the principles in it are perfectly applicable to understanding how similar systems like OpenAI’s Dall-E or Google’s Imagen work under the hood as well. These systems are probably best known for their amazing ability to turn text prompts (e.g. ‘paradise cosmic beach’) into a matching image. Sometimes. Well, usually, anyway.”

Bing Blog: Image Creator now live in select countries for Microsoft Bing and coming soon in Microsoft Edge

Bing Blog: Image Creator now live in select countries for Microsoft Bing and coming soon in Microsoft Edge. “Image Creator allows you to create an image that doesn’t exist, limited only by your imagination. Simply type in a description of something, any additional context like location or activity, and an art style, and Image Creator will make it for you.”

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: AI is plundering the imagination and replacing it with a slot machine

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: AI is plundering the imagination and replacing it with a slot machine. “These tools represent the complete corporate capture of the imagination, that most private and unpredictable part of the human mind. Professional artists aren’t a cause for worry. They’ll likely soon lose interest in a tool that makes all the important decisions for them. The concern is for everyone else. When tinkerers and hobbyists, doodlers and scribblers—not to mention kids just starting to perceive and explore the world—have this kind of instant gratification at their disposal, their curiosity is hijacked and extracted.” And here is my periodic reminder that I include articles in this section (opinion) with which I do not necessarily agree.

Analytics India: Google Releases a New Text-Based Image Editing Model Called ‘Imagic’

Analytics India: Google Releases a New Text-Based Image Editing Model Called ‘Imagic’. “Google researchers recently came up with a new text-based image editing method called ‘Imagic’. Imagic uses an input image and a text prompt—describing the edit—to then produce an edited image as its output. This new method, they claim, is unlike any of their previous methods for it doesn’t require any additional inputs.”

How-To Geek: What Happens if You Let a 4-Year-Old Use an AI Art Generator?

How-To Geek: What Happens if You Let a 4-Year-Old Use an AI Art Generator?. “That’s the amazing thing about the many AI image generators that are available now. Obviously, there are limits to what the AI can do, but you are basically free to enter anything and see what happens. It’s a playground for your imagination. I decided to let my 4-year-old have some fun in that playground.”

Motherboard: AI Is Probably Using Your Images and It’s Not Easy to Opt Out

Motherboard: AI Is Probably Using Your Images and It’s Not Easy to Opt Out. “Viral image-generating AI tools like DALL-E and Stable Diffusion are powered by massive datasets of images that are scraped from the internet, and if one of those images is of you, there’s no easy way to opt out, even if you never explicitly agreed to have it posted online. In one stark example of how sensitive images can end up powering these AI tools, a user found a medical image in the LAION dataset, which was used to train Stable Diffusion and Google’s Imagen.”

PC Magazine: Why This Online Archivist Isn’t Feeling Much Angst About AI-Generated Art

PC Magazine: Why This Online Archivist Isn’t Feeling Much Angst About AI-Generated Art. “The rise of the creative machines–AI routines that can generate original pictures in response to simple descriptions of the desired image–isn’t something to fear, according to a longtime scholar of digital culture. ‘I am no more scared of this than I am of the fill tool,’ Jason Scott said in a talk at The Atlantic Festival in Washington, comparing AI image generators like DALL-E 2 and Stable Diffusion to features in Adobe Photoshop. ‘Or the clone brush.’”

How-To Geek: “UnstableFusion” Makes AI Art Easy on Windows, Mac, and Linux

How-To Geek: “UnstableFusion” Makes AI Art Easy on Windows, Mac, and Linux. “‘UnstableFusion’ is another front-end that is rising in popularity, available on Windows, Mac, and Linux. It’s a native desktop application, instead of a command-line tool or a local web server, so it’s one of the easiest ways to try Stable Diffusion right now. The main catch is that you still need to install Python, the Stable Diffusion model, and other components on your own — the full instructions are available in the readme file.”