Lifehacker: How To Use Google Lens’ New Features

Lifehacker: How To Use Google Lens’ New Features . “Google Lens, once a Pixel-only feature, is now a part of the Google Photos app (or a standalone Android download). During Google I/O this year, Google announced a number of new features for Google Lens, and you can play with them on both iOS and Android right now – assuming your device now supports Lens in its Camera app (or the standalone Lens app, if it doesn’t).”

Neowin: Data scientist enlists Google’s help to unite machine learning and ramen

Neowin: Data scientist enlists Google’s help to unite machine learning and ramen . “If your definition of a hyperfuturistic setting involves robots being able to identify which store the bowl of ramen that just got delivered to you came from, we’ve gotten one step closer to your imagined utopia.”

Earther: This New App Is Like Shazam for Your Nature Photos

Earther: This New App Is Like Shazam for Your Nature Photos. “In July of 2016, thousands of people wandered out into streets and parks under the guidance of a hugely popular wildlife app. The app was Pokemon Go, and the wildlife did not, in any real sense, exist. Yet while Pokemon fans were attempting to collect fantastic—if ultimately digital—animals, some inevitably found real ones as well… if you wanted an app that would mimic Pokemon Go but for existing species, you were largely out of luck. That changed in early March, when social media site iNaturalist released SEEK, an iOS app for people who want to search out local flora and fauna. The new app is part of an ongoing attempt to tempt people into citizen science—and to get them to see the wonder in species they might otherwise ignore.”

The Next Web: Google Lens now describes landmarks and creates contacts from business cards

The Next Web: Google Lens now describes landmarks and creates contacts from business cards. “Google Lens is a handy little tool. Announced at Google I/O 2017, Lens is essentially a visual search engine. Take a picture with your phone, and Google will do some clever analysis and provide insights into what you’re looking at. Now, it’s getting even better, and can store information from business cards as contacts, and even describe landmarks you’ve spotted.”

The AI-Powered Search Engine for Security & Surveillance Video is Here: Meet Ella (Digital Journal) (PRESS RELEASE)

Digital Journal: The AI-Powered Search Engine for Security & Surveillance Video is Here: Meet Ella (PRESS RELEASE). “From the moment Ella comes online and is connected, it begins learning and tagging objects the cameras sees. The deep learning engine lives in the cloud and comes preloaded with recognition of thousands of objects like makes and models of cars; within the first minute of being online, users can start to search their footage. Hardware agnostic, Ella also solves the issue of limited bandwidth for any HD streaming camera or NVR. Rather than push every second of recorded video to the cloud, Ella features interest-based video compression. Based on machine learning algorithms that recognize patterns of motion in each camera scene to recognize what is interesting within each scene, Ella will only record in HD when it recognizes something important.”

The Verge: You can help teach a snake-spotting AI to spot snakes better

The Verge: You can help teach a snake-spotting AI to spot snakes better. “A team of reptile and amphibian enthusiasts is asking for the public’s help training artificial intelligence to spot snakes, frogs, and more from photos. The team wants to eventually create an app that can help people identify these creatures in their backyards — and prevent people from killing them. But first, their AI has to get better at making those photo IDs.”

Carnegie Mellon: CMU Wins NEH Grant for Advanced Computer Analysis of Teenie Harris Archive

Carnegie Mellon: CMU Wins NEH Grant for Advanced Computer Analysis of Teenie Harris Archive. “A collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University’s Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the Carnegie Museum of Art aims to identify, annotate and organize the massive body of work of photographer Charles ‘Teenie’ Harris. The project has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to create a set of image identification tools using machine learning and computer vision techniques. The software developed by the STUDIO will be open-source and compliant with international digital image standards, allowing the tool to be applied to collections across the globe.”