TechCrunch: All Facebook users can now access a tool to port data to Google Photos

TechCrunch: All Facebook users can now access a tool to port data to Google Photos. “Facebook’s photo transfer tool is now available globally half a year on from an initial rollout in Europe, the company said today. The data portability feature enables users of the social network to directly port a copy of their photos to Google’s eponymous photo storage service via encrypted transfer, rather than needing to download and manually upload photos themselves — thereby reducing the hassle involved with switching to a rival service.”

The National: 13 insightful photos of early 1900s Palestine taken by engineer Nasri Fuleihan

The National: 13 insightful photos of early 1900s Palestine taken by engineer Nasri Fuleihan. “The Nasri Fuleihan Collection comprises more than 350 photographs by Nasri Fuleihan, who worked as an engineer in Palestine and helped exploring for oil in the Middle East. His photographs, taken between 1912 and 1924, can be viewed online thanks to Akkasah, NYU Abu Dhabi’s (NYUAD) Centre for Photography, which digitises photos from the region that documents day-to-day life. The collections are shared on the centre’s website for the public to browse and for researchers to use as resources.”

EurekAlert: Does posting edited self photos on social media increase risk of eating disorders?

EurekAlert: Does posting edited self photos on social media increase risk of eating disorders?. “New research revealed a consistent and direct link between posting edited photos on Instagram and risk factors for eating disorders. Specifically, digitally editing pictures to improve personal appearance before posting photos to Instagram increased weight and shape concerns in college students.”

PsyPost: Analysis of 31,500 social media photos finds a connection between nature and happiness

PsyPost: Analysis of 31,500 social media photos finds a connection between nature and happiness. “The researchers used artificial intelligence to gather 31,534 photographs from 185 countries that had been uploaded to the website Flickr and automatically detect their content. They found that photographs tagged as #fun, #vacations and #honeymoons were more likely to contain elements of nature such as plants, water and natural landscape compared to photographs tagged #daily or #routines.”

Wired: I Can’t Stop Escaping Into Google Photos’ Nostalgia Vortex

Wired: I Can’t Stop Escaping Into Google Photos’ Nostalgia Vortex . ” This spring, the coronavirus pandemic shut down college campuses and canceled gatherings across the country. For those of us so privileged that our only diagnosis is to stay home, long stretches of isolation and anxiety spirals still take a mental toll. The idea that there might be an escape hatch from the fear and grief many of us are feeling, however temporary, has never been more seductive. My own colleagues have found escapist respite in Animal Crossing and reality TV, ASMR and a Barbie Polaroid camera. On sleep-starved nights, I’ve tapped through each one of my apps, in search of solace within the safe perimeter of my phone screen. This was how I opened my long-dormant Google Photos app—and unleashed the most potent diversion of them all.”

The Verge: Facebook’s new tool makes it easy to transfer photos and videos to Google Photos

The Verge: Facebook’s new tool makes it easy to transfer photos and videos to Google Photos. “Facebook is rolling out a new tool today allowing users in the US and Canada to transfer their photos and videos to Google Photos. The tool can be accessed by heading to your Facebook settings, then heading to the tab that reads ‘Your Facebook Information.’ There you’ll find the option to transfer your photos and videos. You’ll need to connect your Google account before you can transfer your files.”

Tennessee State Library and Archives: Kinsall Collection Now Available on TeVA

Tennessee State Library and Archives: Kinsall Collection Now Available on TeVA. “The Lt. Col. J.Y. Kinsall Collection is now available to view online. This collection centered around Lt. Col. J.Y. Kinsall, a World War II and Korean War veteran. During his military career, Kinsall cultivated a passion for photography. Most of the photos and slides in this collection document his personal and military life during the Korean War. He took pictures of his family living in Japan, landscapes in South Korea, and photos of everyday life in Morocco.”