Fast Company: I’m a trans woman. Google Photos doesn’t know how to categorize me

Fast Company: I’m a trans woman. Google Photos doesn’t know how to categorize me. “The world is full of traps like this for me, whether it’s the bouncer who looks at my driver’s license and demands a second ID before letting me into the bar, or the unchangeable email address that uses an old name. Trans people are constantly having to reckon with the fact that the world has no clear idea of who we are; either we’re the same as we used to be, and thus are called the wrong name or gender at every turn, or we’re different, a stranger to our friends and a threat to airport security. There’s no way to win.”

CNET: Take 3D photos on your iPhone or Android phone with this app

CNET: Take 3D photos on your iPhone or Android phone with this app. “Whether you have a new phone like the iPhone 11 or an older one like a Motorola Moto G6 or iPhone 6S, you can now take 3D photos with your camera. It’s all thanks to a new app called LucidPix. Instead of requiring a special accessory or two rear phone cameras, the app uses artificial intelligence (AI) to render 3D photos that will move as you tilt and pan your phone.”

iNews UK: Beaulieu makes 1m historic motoring images available to the public with new website

iNews UK: Beaulieu makes 1m historic motoring images available to the public with new website. “Visitors to the new MPL website can browse through more than 120,000 colour images and more than one million black and white pictures covering everything from motorsport and supercars to commercial vehicles and the social history of motoring, plus promotional materials such as posters and brochures.” This is the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu.

Afloat Ireland: Dublin Port Steps In To Save Online Archive Of Historic Dock Workers Images

Afloat Ireland: Dublin Port Steps In To Save Online Archive Of Historic Dock Workers Images . “Dublin Port has stepped in to save the extensive photographic images collection of the Dublin Dock Workers’ Preservation Society, writes Tom MacSweeney.”

Ōkawa Tatsuya: Japan’s Best-Known Unknown Face (Nippon)

Nippon: Ōkawa Tatsuya: Japan’s Best-Known Unknown Face. “Looking for a different kind of job, Ōkawa was surfing the Internet when he happened to come across Pakutaso, which was recruiting models. He got in touch and was soon hired, although this was a job with no pay. Pakutaso is an outfit run on a shoestring by a handful of people who draw no salaries themselves and who provide stock photos to anyone free of charge. No matter how many times Ōkawa’s photo was uploaded to the Internet, he stood to receive not a single yen. Despite that, Ōkawa felt that the Internet’s time had come. He innocently believed that the more he got his face out there, the better his job prospects would be.” This is one of those stories that leaves me fascinated and full of questions and melancholic and bone-aware of how many people there are in the world and how different they all are.

Nieman Lab: Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation

Nieman Lab: Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation. “If a photo has been ’shopped, was it changed just a little or a lot? Did the editing harmlessly change the white balance or fundamentally alter the reality the photo is supposed to represent? Is a tight crop excluding important context or appropriately directing a viewer’s focus to something? Then apply all of that to videos. Where’s the line between a deepfake and a cheapfake? Your head starts to hurt. The unsung heroes of the Internet are the people who develop the standards by which information gets encoded into structured data, and said heroes are now turning their attention to this particular problem, visual misinformation. ”