SF Gate: A San Francisco archive has added hundreds of amazing photos. See the best ones here.

SF Gate: A San Francisco archive has added hundreds of amazing photos. See the best ones here.. “For San Francisco history lovers, there are few places more amazing on the internet than OpenSFHistory. The image archive, kick-started by an anonymous private collector, houses over 45,000 historic images of the city, from pre-Gold Rush to the 1990s. It’s a trove of street views, everyday life and famous local events. As photos are donated, scanned and uploaded, OpenSFHistory occasionally adds a big set of new images. They’ve done that recently, and we went through and found some of the most interesting gems in the gallery above.”

Oskaloosa Herald: Family photos connect Iowans to history

Oskaloosa Herald: Family photos connect Iowans to history. “[Bettina] Fabos discovered the original Fortepan photo archive in 2013 in Hungary, where she was a Fulbright scholar. The project began when a group of friends in Budapest rescued a discarded box of old photos and decided to post them online in 2010….Fabos brought the idea home to Iowa and created the world’s first Fortepan archive outside of Hungary. Others are in the works in Minnesota, as well as Denmark, Malta, Romania and India.”

Photoshop detector: Adobe demos tool that identifies picture editing (CNET)

CNET: Photoshop detector: Adobe demos tool that identifies picture editing. “…About Face uses machine learning to determine if a face in a photo has been manipulated in Photoshop. It looks at the pixels of a photo and offers the probably from 0% to 100% of whether the image has been altered. It can also tell you what parts of the face were changed and undo those changes to reveal the original, un-Photoshopped image.”

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes. “Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times are tired of seeing fake media propagate, and they’re teaming up to do something about it. The trio has launched a Content Authenticity Initiative that aims to create a standard for digital media attribution. Ideally, you’d know whether or not a picture or video is legitimate simply by examining the file — you’d know if it had been manipulated.”

In the Library’s Web Archives: Dig If You Will the Pictures (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: In the Library’s Web Archives: Dig If You Will the Pictures. “The Digital Content Management section has been working on a project to extract and make available sets of files from the Library’s significant Web Archives holdings. This is another step to explore the Web Archives and make them more widely accessible and usable. Our aim in creating these sets is to identify reusable, ‘real world’ content in the Library’s digital collections, which we can provide for public access. The outcome of the project will be a series of datasets, each containing 1,000 files of related media types selected from .gov domains. We will announce and explore these datasets here on The Signal, and the data will be made available through LC Labs.”

CNN: How your poop can help train AI

Behold, the GROSSEST THING I HAVE EVER PUT IN RESEARCHBUZZ, from CNN: How your poop can help train AI. “The next time you go to the bathroom, a couple startups are hoping you’ll snap a photo before you flush. For scientific reasons, of course. No, really. Two companies — Auggi, a gut-health startup that’s building an app for people to track gastrointestinal issues, and Seed Health, which works on applying microbes to human health and sells probiotics — are soliciting poop photos from anyone who wants to send them.”