Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross

Ars Technica: Terahertz imaging reveals hidden inscription on 16th-century funerary cross. “In recent years, a variety of cutting-edge non-destructive imaging methods have proved to be a boon to art conservationists and archaeologists alike. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. For instance, ground-penetrating radar (radio waves) is great for locating buried artifacts, among other uses, while lidar is useful for creating high-resolution maps of surface terrain. Infrared reflectography is well-suited to certain artworks whose materials contain pigments that reflect a lot of infrared light.”

Tech Xplore: ‘Off label’ use of imaging databases could lead to bias in AI algorithms, study finds

Tech Xplore: ‘Off label’ use of imaging databases could lead to bias in AI algorithms, study finds. “Significant advances in artificial intelligence (AI) over the past decade have relied upon extensive training of algorithms using massive, open-source databases. But when such datasets are used ‘off label’ and applied in unintended ways, the results are subject to machine learning bias that compromises the integrity of the AI algorithm, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Texas at Austin.”

EurekAlert: NIST method uses radio signals to image hidden and speeding objects

EurekAlert: NIST method uses radio signals to image hidden and speeding objects. “Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Wavsens LLC have developed a method for using radio signals to create real-time images and videos of hidden and moving objects, which could help firefighters find escape routes or victims inside buildings filled with fire and smoke. The technique could also help track hypersonic objects such as missiles and space debris.”

Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research: The Cancer Imaging Archive posts COVID-19 imaging data to benefit community

Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research: The Cancer Imaging Archive posts COVID-19 imaging data to benefit community. “Publicly available data sets related to COVID-19 are appearing in an unexpected place—the Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), a project of the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis of the National Cancer Institute. Since the start of the pandemic, researchers around the world have been racing to learn as much as possible about the virus—how it spreads, how to diagnose and treat it, and how to develop vaccines against it. One way to help speed up scientific discovery is data sharing.”

EurekAlert: Researchers deconstruct ancient Jewish parchment using multiple imaging techniques

EurekAlert: Researchers deconstruct ancient Jewish parchment using multiple imaging techniques. “A picture may be worth a thousand words, but capturing multiple images of an artifact across the electromagnetic spectrum can tell a rich story about the original creation and degradation of historical objects over time. Researchers recently demonstrated how this was possible using several complementary imaging techniques to non-invasively probe a Jewish parchment scroll. The results were published in the journal Frontiers in Materials.”